Author Topic: Living in an LSAM  (Read 3671 times)

Offline darkenfast

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Living in an LSAM
« on: 11/22/2005 07:00 PM »
The LSAM seems to be the most "notional" of the ESAS vehicles, at this point.  What I find interesting is that, aside from it's cargo-carrying capacity, it's going to have to support four very hard-working astronauts for a week or more on the surface.  The Apollo LM had habitability pretty far down on its list of priorities (for good reasons).   But, if you actually start thinking about what's involved in supporting four people on full-length EVA's on back-to-back days, you can see that the LSAM's cabin is going to have to meet some tough requirements.  No one's expecting luxury, but tired and sore astronauts are more likely to make mistakes.

First of all, they are going to be in a gravity field, so they will need a place to sleep, comfortably.  Second, they will need a table surface to eat, repair things and plan on.  Third, they will need a toilet.   I've been sketching (again), and I like the following arragement:

Assuming a cylindrical pressure hull (as shown on all the artwork so far), at the forward end are the controls and positions for two astronauts, either standing in restraints, or in fairly upright "barstool" seats (to make it easier to see as wide a field of view as possible during the landing).  The middle section is two meters long.  It has a settee on one side (where the other two astronauts sit during landing and launch.  This settee is also the lowest of three bunks.  The back flips up for the second bunk, and the third flips down from the curved overhead.  A portable table will be set in front of this settee, when needed.  On the other side is a wall of lockers and also the galley/sink unit.  This unit extends up about 1.7 metres, and has the fourth bunk on top of it.  

To the rear of this is storage for EVA equipment, and one alternative position for the toilet.  The other possibility would be to put it in the airlock, wih the dust and smells.  I'm not sure whether the airlock requirement will be for cycling all four at once, or just two at a time, so that's a big question mark.   There seems to be room enough under the settee and the deck, and in the wall of lockers, etc. for that life support equipment which needs to be inside the pressure hull.  

This will be the first spacecraft with real accomodations for living under gravity, so I'm quite interested to see how it turns out.
Your turn!

Offline rsp1202

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #1 on: 11/22/2005 08:00 PM »
Packaging control and housekeeping/living functions in a cylinder will be easier than for a cone, but will still take some ingenuity. NASA designers can ask Navy submariners how they do it. Front and side layout as you envision. Overhead and bulkhead mounts can also handle a lot of controls and instrumentation. The rear of cabin will be taken up by two-person airlock, with commode squeezed in next to it. Still no way to avoid a tight fit--think decompression chamber for divers with a schosh more headroom. This is when you find out who your real friends are. That whole section could take up a third of usable space, if not more. Hopefully there will be enough space for two-chamber airlock; first will hold suits and pressurization controls, second smaller chamber for passing through into cabin in order to prevent tracking in dust.

The notional LSAM descent stage looks large enough to accommodate tools and any equipment that won't fit in cabin, not to mention two rovers.

Online nacnud

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #2 on: 11/22/2005 08:04 PM »
Take a look at NASAs Aquarius perhaps you can get some more ideas from that.

Offline rsp1202

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #3 on: 11/22/2005 08:41 PM »
Internal space of LSAM might also have to accommodate ascent engine cover as on Apollo's LM, terminating in the absolutely humungous ascent stage engine bell.

Also of note: studying the latest presentation, it appears that once the astronauts exit LSAM from rear, they will have to maneuver around small deck area sitting atop descent stage before heading down to surface via ladder on side leg. That's certainly different than before, but adds some room for setting down their parcels from Christmas shopping.

It's an interesting design so far, but things will no doubt change between now and then. See attachment.

Offline CuddlyRocket

RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #4 on: 11/23/2005 12:57 PM »
Quote
rsp1202 - 22/11/2005  9:00 PM

NASA designers can ask Navy submariners how they do it.
One way is not to have the same number of bunks as crewmembers! They hot bunk - i.e. each bunk is used by more than one crewmember.

You may not need all four crewmembers asleep at the same time. Especially for longer missions, it might be advisable to have at least one person awake at the controls at all times - 'on watch' - in which case you only need three bunks.

Offline holmec

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #5 on: 11/23/2005 02:20 PM »
LOL do I see Andy Griffith peeking out that capsule?

That's from a show!

Offline rsp1202

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #6 on: 11/23/2005 03:43 PM »
"Salvage 1." Andy, yes. Opie shot pic.

Offline darkenfast

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RE: Living in an LSAM
« Reply #7 on: 11/23/2005 10:00 PM »
I think the nature of the work on the surface will require all four astronauts to be on the same schedule.  I don't think they will be able to both sleep and use the LSAM for surface ops at the same time.  NASA appears to avoid "shifts", with the exception of some shuttle science missions that required 24hr operations, because of problems with sleeping.  In spite of the low gravity, by the time preparation, EVA and clean-up are done, the crews are going to be tired.  If they are to do it for several days in a row, they will need good sleep.  This is what got me interested in the lay-out of the LSAM.  It's a fun problem!  BTW, the post above about the undersea habitat is interesting, but they have tons of room compared to the LSAM!

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