Author Topic: applications for this technology?  (Read 1904 times)

Offline zbarlici

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applications for this technology?
« on: 07/02/2007 02:28 PM »
Check out this video...  Some dude playing with RF generator figured out he can get salt water to burn at peaks of 1500 degrees... any potential applications for energy generation/car propulsion?

http://www.metacafe.com/watch/697020/salt_water/

Offline Jim

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Re: applications for this technology?
« Reply #1 on: 07/02/2007 02:53 PM »
no, because the energy used in the RF generator is probably greater than the energy coming out of the water

Offline Tom Ligon

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Re: applications for this technology?
« Reply #2 on: 07/02/2007 03:38 PM »
This topic has now surfaced on three unrelated boards I frequent:  analogsf.com, fusor.net, and here!

There must be some useful chemical processing application for this.  The chemistry must be as energetic as hell, literally.

Offline PhalanxTX

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Re: applications for this technology?
« Reply #3 on: 07/02/2007 03:49 PM »
For some reason, I couldn't help but get an image of a steampunk sci-fi steam rocket using this technology.  ;)
"The dinosaurs became extinct because they didn't have a space program, and if we become extinct because we don't have a space program, it'll serve us right!"

-- Larry Niven, quoted by Arthur Clarke in interview at Space.com, 2001

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Offline zbarlici

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RE: applications for this technology?
« Reply #4 on: 07/02/2007 03:54 PM »
lol


steampunk steam rocket.

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