Author Topic: Flight crew assignments  (Read 1140288 times)

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2680 on: 07/05/2017 05:58 PM »
Reid Wiseman is now listed as a Management Astronaut.
https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/management

Offline SMS

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2681 on: 07/05/2017 07:45 PM »
Now he is the new Deputy Chief of the Astronaut Office.
« Last Edit: 07/06/2017 09:12 PM by SMS »
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SMS ;-).

Offline Hog

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2682 on: 07/06/2017 12:12 PM »
The new Canadian astronauts are:
Sidey, Jennifer and Kutryk, Joshua



Some more info


http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/astronauts/bio-joshua-kutryk.asp

http://www.asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/astronauts/bio-jennifer-sidey.asp



...and Happy 150 Canada Day to all Canadian NSF members !!!
That brings our Active Astronauts Corps up to a contingent of 4 active members.

Jeremy Hansen,
David Saint-Jacques
Joshua Kutryk,
Jennifer Sidey

St. Jacques is scheduled for a 6 month ISS rotation, next year in 2018. It's the 17th Canadian space mission and the third "long-duration" mission.
Jeremy Hansen will probably fly in 2024, if still in the Canadian Astronaut Corps. He is currently 41, and will be aged 47 come 2024.  He was born just up the road from my hometown.
Paul

Offline Jeff Lerner

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2683 on: 07/12/2017 11:29 PM »
Probably not of interest to anyone unless you're Canadian but what the heck.....


.."Former astronaut Julie Payette to be Canada's next Governor General.."


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/governor-general-canada-julie-payette-1.4201614

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2684 on: 07/18/2017 04:25 PM »
July 18, 2017
RELEASE J17-009
Astronaut William McArthur Retires from NASA

After almost three decades of service to the agency, veteran NASA astronaut William McArthur has retired from NASA. His last day with the agency was June 24.

“We will greatly miss Bill’s excellent leadership at NASA, and we’ve been the fortunate recipient of his many years of dedicated service to America’s space agency,” said Ellen Ochoa, director of NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. “Bill and I were part of the same astronaut class in 1990. He brought the same enthusiasm he had for his flying career, along with his expertise as a crew member, to his recent positions as director of our safety and mission assurance office and manager of the space shuttle safety and mission assurance office. I wish him all the best as he embarks on the next phase of his life.”

McArthur began his career in the U.S. Army in 1973. He was assigned to NASA’s Johnson Space Center in 1987, after graduating from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and being designated an experimental test pilot. He spent three years as a space shuttle vehicle integration test engineer, testing the flight control system for each orbiter before being selected as an astronaut.

As an astronaut, McArthur logged 224 days and 22 hours in space during three space shuttle missions and one long-duration stay at the International Space Station. He made his first flight on board space shuttle Columbia, as part of the STS-58 crew in 1993. It was the second Spacelab Life Sciences mission, and McArthur and his crewmates collected more than 650 biological samples from themselves and rodents for 14 different experiments.

McArthur then flew on space shuttle Atlantis for his second mission, STS-74, in 1995. The mission was the second to dock to the Russian Space Station Mir, and delivered a permanent docking module, making future space shuttle dockings safer.

McArthur made his first visit to the International Space Station in 2000, as part of space shuttle Discovery’s STS-92 mission. He conducted two spacewalks, and with his crewmates delivered a truss segment and a pressurized mating adapter to the space station, preparing it for its first residents.

McArthur himself became a six-month resident of the space station on his final mission, Expedition 12, in 2005 and 2006. McArthur served as commander and science officer for the crew, and conducted two more spacewalks, including the only spacewalk ever conducted in NASA’s Extravehicular Mobility Unit without the aid of additional crew members inside the spacecraft. His total time spent spacewalking is 24 hours and 21 minutes.

Following his expedition, McArthur went on to manage the Space Shuttle Safety and Mission Assurance Office, then the Space Shuttle Orbiter Project. Since 2011, he has been the director of Johnson’s Safety and Mission Assurance directorate.

McArthur was born in in Laurinburg, North Carolina, but considers Wakulla, North Carolina, to be his hometown. He holds a Bachelor of Science degree in applied science and engineering from the U.S. Military Academy, in West Point, New York, and a Master of Science degree in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology.

Find McArthur’s complete biography at:

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/mcarthur_william.pdf

-end-

Offline Rocket Science

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2685 on: 07/18/2017 04:39 PM »
Happy-trails Bill and thank you for your service! :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator, Vintage auto racer

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2686 on: 07/31/2017 11:04 AM »
http://www.pressreader.com/china/china-daily/20170728/textview
Chinese, European astronauts to train jointly to survive sea landings
Quote
“Chinese astronauts Ye Guangfu and Chen Dong will join Samantha Cristoforetti of Italy and Germany’s Matthias Maurer for a 10-day joint training program in Yantai, on the Bohai Strait, in late August.
The objective of the cooperation with CMSA is to fly a European astronaut on the Chinese Space Station in 2022.”

Online ZachS09

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2687 on: 07/31/2017 01:04 PM »
Good to see CNSA let some of ESA's astronauts eventually fly aboard Shenzhou spacecrafts.

Still a shame that NASA can't participate due to the espionage risk.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Hog

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2688 on: 07/31/2017 02:26 PM »
Good to see CNSA let some of ESA's astronauts eventually fly aboard Shenzhou spacecrafts.

Still a shame that NASA can't participate due to the espionage risk.
Something about working with Communist countries that makes the US "nervous".   Americans will fly on Shenzous the moment that Chinese Astros fly on ISS.

Canada is an Associate member of ESA.  Any chance our "Corps of Four"can "hitch a ride" on Chinese vehicles?  Hey, we can build excellent Remote Manipulator Systems in trade.
Paul

Online jacqmans

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2689 on: 08/16/2017 03:28 PM »
August 16, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-094

2017 Astronaut Candidates Available for Interviews Before Training


NASA’s newest astronaut candidates, a diverse dozen women and men, will participate in media interviews and a final news conference before training on Tuesday, Aug. 22, at the agency’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

NASA Television will broadcast a conversation between the astronaut candidates and members of the Expedition 52 crew, who currently are working and living aboard the International Space Station, at 12:45 p.m. EDT Tuesday, followed immediately by the news conference.

A limited number of five-minute interviews with individual astronaut candidates are available, in person or by phone. To request an interview or credentials to attend the news conference, U.S. media must contact Johnson’s newsroom by 5 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 17.

Media who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must call Johnson’s newsroom at 281-483-5111 no later than 12:30 p.m. Aug. 22.

NASA’s astronaut candidates are: Kayla Barron, Zena Cardman, Raja Chari, Matthew Dominick, Bob Hines, Warren “Woody” Hoburg, Dr. Jonny Kim, Robb Kulin, Jasmin Moghbeli, Loral O’Hara, Dr. Francisco “Frank” Rubio and Jessica Watkins.

They will be joined in training and at the news conference by Canadian Space Agency astronaut candidates Joshua Kutryk and Jennifer Sidey.

This is the last expected opportunity for interviews with the astronaut candidates until they complete two years of training. Their training will focus on International Space Station systems, spacewalking, robotic operations, T-38 jet operations, and the Russian language. In addition to these skills, the astronaut candidates perfect expeditionary skills such as leadership, followership, team care and communication through activities like survival training and geology treks. They also learn about NASA’s work in other areas, including aeronautics and research.

Follow NASA astronauts on Twitter at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_Astronauts

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2690 on: 08/19/2017 08:29 PM »
http://www.iflscience.com/space/meet-nasa-astronaut-zena-cardman-antarctic-adventurer-and-trained-poet/

“More than 18,000 applied when the job posting went live,” future astronaut Zena Cardman told IFLScience. “After the first round of interviews, there were just 120 remaining; for the final round, there were 50. And then there were 12 – and I’m one of them.”

The allure of the dark star ocean is difficult for anyone to resist – the enormity of it all, the planets, the galaxies, the comets, and the black holes, all wrapped in an impermeable mystery.

No wonder so many kids want to be an astronaut when they grow up, but so few actually get to see if their dreams match up to the extraordinary reality. Shifting expectations, societal barriers, and pressures all contribute to this discrepancy, but the extremely tough selection process itself definitely has something to do with it.

Back in May, NASA announced that it had picked its Class of 2017 – 12 highly skilled and ludicrously lucky individuals that would be trained up to escape Earth’s atmosphere. We sat down to have a chat with a couple of them – both future heroines taking women in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) to the extreme.

Cardman, a self-confessed “microbe wrangler” and Antarctica frequenter, was first up. Hailing from Virginia, she was in the middle of her PhD in microbiology at Penn State when she applied, and even when she received the fate-changing final call.

“I genuinely thought I wouldn’t get it, and I thought that at every stage of the process. The day after I turned in my application, there was all this stuff in the press about 18,000 people applying – so I thought, there goes that!”

The first round of applications opened in December 2015, posted online across several job application websites, like any ordinary job would be. Then came the unnerving waiting. Months flew by, and the first interview requests were sent out in September 2016. After the second round in April, the 12 winners of the competition to end all competitions were found out in May.

“Getting the call for the first round interview was one of complete shock – even more of a shock than the second round one, it was so out of the blue,” Cardman added.

“Just meeting everyone that were experts at what they do, with such a diversity of experience – and so humble and nice on top of that – I just thought there was no way, I wouldn’t be picked out of these people.”

She was ultimately chosen, of course. We point out that she now has the stress of actually being an astronaut for real. “Well that’s a wonderful problem to have,” she replied.

Although she points out that it wasn’t as “cutthroat” as she imagined, Cardman describes the entire process as “definitely unlike any other job interview that I’d had.” Although much of the interview process remains off-the-record and under wraps, it all sounds a little more like the interviews shown at the start of Men In Black than anything else.

Considering that Cardman’s expertise is in extreme life forms – the sort lurking around deep-sea hydrothermal vents and beneath ice sheets – talk of alien life wouldn’t be amiss here. However, it seems that NASA was far more interested in her as a person, and in her experiences, than her academic background.

“I expected to do so many sit ups in a certain amount of time, or run a mile, or do a hundred pull ups or whatever, but they really are just trying to get to know you,” she explains.

“Really, they want to know if they’re willing to spend six months in a tin can with you.”
content-1502286888-bark-europa.jpg
Probably not as high-tech as you'd imagine. xyzena.com

In any case, her academic career – much of which was spent on isolated research vessels heading along the coastline of the Southern Continent, along with a small but diverse crew – certainly appealed to the upper echelons of NASA. After all, this sounds a lot like what she will be doing in a couple of years’ time.

“Antarctica is like summer camp for grown-ups, but cold,” Cardman tells us. You work together, you play together. It’s a really great experience because you have all these different types of people with a common goal of doing a science project – from academics to engineers to cooks to electricians.”

She describes her time in Antarctica – “a constant nature documentary” – as instrumental to not just career, but her life. “It’s amazing, getting to see penguins in real life, getting to smell penguins in real life – that last part is less exciting. They are endlessly adorable and fun to watch.”

She added that, on Christmas morning, while they were out on a pair of Zodiac speedboats, “some humpbacks appeared right next to me – you could reach out and touch them if you wanted to. I am so grateful for that experience.”
content-1502286970-penguins.jpg
Penguin spotting - a classic pastime in Antarctica. xyzena.com

Cardman’s time in extreme environments conducting cutting-edge science certainly seems like a good fit for a future astronaut, but her earlier time at university featured a somewhat more eclectic mix of subjects, including biology, marine science, and poetry.

She signed up for poetry at first simply because all science majors had to take an English class, but thanks to a wonderful lecturer – a long-term substitute to boot – and a fantastic course, she ended up writing a thesis on the subject. “It’d be my last chance to do that sort of thing,” she adds.

We mention the scene in the movie Contact, where protagonist Dr. Ellie Arroway, upon seeing an alien civilization for the first time, remarked: “They should have sent a poet.” How does Cardman feel about finally being an astronaut that ticks this box?

“I hope that experience will help me convey the things that I see when I eventually go to space,” she tells us, before adding: “God, I really… I have no idea what to expect.

“From what I understand, this job continues to feel surreal and fake until that moment that you lift off. But I think getting to see the curve of the Earth against that black background – it must be completely life-altering. I can’t even imagine what it’ll be like, but I hope I’ll be able to convey that back home.”

So what happens now, we ask. With a wonderful sense of nonchalance, Cardman tells us that “the first two years is the training period. It’ll be like being back in school again; everything from learning to fly P-38 supersonic jets to learning spacewalking techniques.”

She’ll also be mandated to learn the Russian language, “which I’m very excited about – I’ve never learned a language that has a different alphabet before.” Robotics and the workings of the International Space Station (ISS) will also feature heavily.

Indeed, the ISS is where she’ll be headed first, but soon after, “our eyes will turn outwards beyond low-Earth orbit, just like it did with the Apollo program.” Cardman says that whether it’s an asteroid, the Moon, Mars, or anywhere else, she’ll be fine. “I’ll happily go wherever they send me.”

Cardman has done much and explored a lot of Planet Earth in the name of science, and she’s not even 30 yet. That makes her a powerful ambassador for women in STEM – and now, she’s also going to be an astronaut. It’s a one-in-a-billion legacy, and something she doesn’t credit to hard work alone.

“Part of it is that I followed what interested me,” she notes. “But more importantly, I got lucky – I had mentors that wrote back and said they would help me, who took a chance on me when I was just some undergrad.

“I will be forever grateful to them – and to my family of course, who let me go on all these crazy adventures, and who are still supporting me on this new, wild adventure.

“I think I speak for everyone in this class when I say, we haven’t done this alone. That’s for sure.”
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline SMS

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2691 on: 08/21/2017 07:10 PM »
Jeremy R. Hansen @Astro_Jeremy

Staring at the sun... #newastronauts join our corps today with a cool astronomical welcome!
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SMS ;-).

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2692 on: 08/22/2017 04:50 PM »
NASA TV is airing a live event with the 3 on orbit US crew members and the 12 latest astronaut candidates
« Last Edit: 08/22/2017 04:51 PM by Targeteer »
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline SMS

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2693 on: 08/22/2017 06:50 PM »
The 2017 class of astronauts, including 12 from @NASA and 2 from @CSA_ASC, are introduced to Exp 52 crew aboard station.

https://twitter.com/NASA_Astronauts/status/900047985089757184
« Last Edit: 08/23/2017 02:39 PM by SMS »
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SMS ;-).

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2694 on: 08/25/2017 07:11 PM »
Reid Wiseman is now listed as a Management Astronaut.
https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/management
His status was changed back to Active Astronaut.
https://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/biographies/active

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2695 on: 08/28/2017 06:55 PM »

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2696 on: 09/02/2017 09:03 AM »
This http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41016.msg1718610#msg1718610 allows the conclusion, that Robert Behnken and Eric Boe could be the crew of the first Crew Dragon.

Online ZachS09

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2697 on: 09/05/2017 11:16 AM »
This http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41016.msg1718610#msg1718610 allows the conclusion, that Robert Behnken and Eric Boe could be the crew of the first Crew Dragon.

I thought it was one of the four Commercial Crew astronauts from NASA plus a SpaceX employee, which is similar to the first manned Starliner crew that consists of a Boeing employee and one of NASA's CC astronauts.
« Last Edit: 09/05/2017 11:17 AM by ZachS09 »
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2698 on: 09/05/2017 11:26 AM »
This http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=41016.msg1718610#msg1718610 allows the conclusion, that Robert Behnken and Eric Boe could be the crew of the first Crew Dragon.

I thought it was one of the four Commercial Crew astronauts from NASA plus a SpaceX employee, which is similar to the first manned Starliner crew that consists of a Boeing employee and one of NASA's CC astronauts.
SpaceX always said that two NASA astronauts will fly on this mission, no one from SpaceX.

Offline SMS

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #2699 on: 09/17/2017 05:13 PM »
https://twitter.com/Astro_Ellen/status/909225561528168448

Quote
And it's official -- the Turtles!! (On fenceposts, in a Harvey flood) #NewAstronauts
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SMS ;-).

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