Author Topic: Flight crew assignments  (Read 1881386 times)

Offline Michael Cassutt

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1980 on: 01/26/2012 09:27 pm »

No.  For one thing, astronauts can be moved from "management" to "active" status with a phone call.  Michael Cassutt

From today
Quote
Management astronauts are permanently off flight status -- the shift is a one-way move.

Does that mean, that times have changed?

They have indeed.  The astronaut office has had a new sheriff (okay, chief) since fall 2009 -- and every chief astronaut does things a little differently.  The end of the Shuttle program also meant the disappearance of a substantial number of flight opportunities for astronauts who can't meet Soyuz-ISS requirements (or don't want to).  With Shuttle, it was relatively easy to return a "management" astronaut to flight status for a year.  With long-term ISS training, more restrictive physical standards, language challenges, and fewer resources (T-38s, for one), it's not easy and not likely.

MC

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1981 on: 01/27/2012 09:33 am »
The 'Management Astronaut' concept was probably, er, pioneered by John Young after his 'Challenger' memos - unless I'm reading into the situation wrong.
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Online Chris Bergin

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1982 on: 01/27/2012 01:26 pm »
RELEASE: 12-033

ASTRONAUT JERRY ROSS, FIRST SEVEN-TIME FLIER, RETIRES

HOUSTON -- Jerry Ross, the first person to launch into space seven
times, has retired from NASA. In a career that spanned more than
three decades, Ross spent almost 1,400 hours in space and conducted
nine spacewalks to rank third on the list of most extravehicular
activity time in space.

"Jerry has been instrumental in the success of many of NASA's human
spaceflight missions and numerous spacewalks," said Peggy Whitson,
chief of the Astronaut Office. "Not only were his skills and
operational excellence key in major spaceflight activities but his
expertise and vigilance also helped all those who followed in his
footsteps. We are the better for his years of dedication to the corps
and NASA."

Ross joined NASA in 1979 as a payload officer and flight controller.
In 1980, he was selected as an astronaut. He and Franklin Chang-Diaz
are the only two astronauts to have flown into space seven times. In
addition to Ross' spaceflight mission accomplishments, he went on to
serve NASA in the critical role of managing the Vehicle Integration
Test Office.

"Jerry was equally invaluable leading this critical team, especially
through space station assembly, the transition to the space shuttle
retirement, and during the initial phases of our future programs,"
said Janet Kavandi, director of Flight Crew Operations. "He was
considered a mentor to many he worked with there. We wish him the
best in his well-deserved retirement."

Of his seven flights into orbit, Ross flew on space shuttles Endeavour
and Columbia once each and a record-setting five times on shuttle
Atlantis, including his first and last missions. His first flight was
on the STS-61B mission in 1985. His final flight into space was on
the STS-110 mission in 2002.

During his seven missions, he assisted in deploying a number of
satellites and other payloads. He performed experiments in life,
material and Earth sciences, and physics, robotics and astronomy.
Ross was a member of the STS-74 mission's crew, the second mission to
dock to the Russian space station Mir. He also traveled to the
then-fledgling International Space Station, where he helped connect
the U.S.-built Unity node to the Russian Zarya module. On the STS-110
mission, Ross' final trip to space, he was instrumental in delivering
and installing the S0 (S-Zero) truss. Ross accumulated more than
1,393 hours in space, including 58 hours and 18 minutes on nine
spacewalks.

For Ross' complete biography, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/ross.html


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Offline nethegauner

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1983 on: 01/27/2012 04:26 pm »
I can still remember seeing TV pictures of Ross during 61-B -- building those truss structures of the EASE/ACCESS experiments. That was kind of cool. To me, he was the first space construction worker . . !

;)

Offline MATTBLAK

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1984 on: 01/27/2012 10:08 pm »
Jerry Ross is one of a kind. Sad to see him go, but also sadly inevitable too.
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Offline Ben E

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1985 on: 01/28/2012 04:52 am »
Ross' departure really is the end of an era. There have been only a handful of 'career' astronauts and it's always sad when one of them departs. Young, Musgrave and now Ross. I wish him all the best.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1986 on: 01/28/2012 12:54 pm »

They have indeed.  The astronaut office has had a new sheriff (okay, chief) since fall 2009 -- and every chief astronaut does things a little differently.  The end of the Shuttle program also meant the disappearance of a substantial number of flight opportunities for astronauts who can't meet Soyuz-ISS requirements (or don't want to).  With Shuttle, it was relatively easy to return a "management" astronaut to flight status for a year.  With long-term ISS training, more restrictive physical standards, language challenges, and fewer resources (T-38s, for one), it's not easy and not likely.

MC

According to the list of astronauts from yesterday http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/astrobio.html Gregory H. Johnson is back on active status.

Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1987 on: 01/28/2012 01:43 pm »
Another question.
According to this release http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/dec/HQ_11-396_Grunsfeld.html John Grunsfeld is back in NASA.
In this case should he be counted as Management astronaut?
Sorry for bad English.

Offline Space Pete

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1988 on: 01/28/2012 02:35 pm »
Another question.
According to this release http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2011/dec/HQ_11-396_Grunsfeld.html John Grunsfeld is back in NASA.
In this case should he be counted as Management astronaut?

Grunsfeld is back in NASA, however he is no longer an astronaut. He left NASA and the astronaut office, and then a while later was hired back into NASA, but this time in a non-astronaut position (SMD AA).

According to the list of astronauts from yesterday http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/astrobio.html Gregory H. Johnson is back on active status.

Johnson works at NASA Glenn now, in some kind of education/public outreach position.
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Offline Olaf

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1989 on: 01/28/2012 03:09 pm »
Quote
Grunsfeld is back in NASA, however he is no longer an astronaut. He left NASA and the astronaut office, and then a while later was hired back into NASA, but this time in a non-astronaut position (SMD AA).

Thatīs correct, but whatīs about Mr. Bolden and Mr. Coats ?

Quote
Johnson works at NASA Glenn now, in some kind of education/public outreach position
Thatīs also correct. But he works there since last year and in December he was listed as Management astronaut and now he is changed to the astronaut list.
« Last Edit: 01/28/2012 03:40 pm by Olaf »

Offline Michael Cassutt

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1990 on: 01/28/2012 04:16 pm »

They have indeed.  The astronaut office has had a new sheriff (okay, chief) since fall 2009 -- and every chief astronaut does things a little differently.  The end of the Shuttle program also meant the disappearance of a substantial number of flight opportunities for astronauts who can't meet Soyuz-ISS requirements (or don't want to).  With Shuttle, it was relatively easy to return a "management" astronaut to flight status for a year.  With long-term ISS training, more restrictive physical standards, language challenges, and fewer resources (T-38s, for one), it's not easy and not likely.

MC

According to the list of astronauts from yesterday http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/astrobio.html Gregory H. Johnson is back on active status.

So it would seem.  Oddly enough, I hadn't heard that Johnson was classed as management until a couple of weeks ago -- I knew he was on a detail to NASA Glenn that was supposed to last a year, but fully expected him to rotate back to JSC at the end.  This early return (if he _has_ returned) suggests a change of plans somewhere.  I wouldn't take it as a change of policy, however.

Michael Cassutt
« Last Edit: 01/28/2012 04:46 pm by Michael Cassutt »

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1991 on: 01/31/2012 07:45 pm »
RELEASE: 12-038

LEGENDARY ASTRONAUT SHANNON LUCID RETIRES FROM NASA

HOUSTON -- Shannon Lucid, a member of NASA's first astronaut class to
include women, has retired after more than three decades of service
to the agency.

A veteran of five spaceflights, Lucid logged more than 223 days in
space, and from August 1991 to June 2007, held the record for the
most days in orbit by any woman in the world. Lucid is the only
American woman to serve aboard the Russian Mir space station. She
lived and worked there for more than 188 days, the longest stay of
any American on that vehicle. Her time on Mir also set the single
flight endurance record by a woman until Suni Williams broke it in
2006.

"Shannon is an extraordinary woman and scientist. She paved the way
for so many of us," said Peggy Whitson, chief of NASA's Astronaut
Office at the Johnson Space Center in Houston. "She was a model
astronaut for long-duration missions, and whether she was flying
hundreds of miles up in space or serving as Capcom [capsule
communicator] during the overnight hours for our space shuttle and
space station crews, she always brought a smile to our faces. Like so
many others, I always will look up to her."

Lucid, who holds a doctorate in biochemistry, was selected by NASA in
1978. She joined five other women as the agency's first female
astronauts. Her first three shuttle missions deployed satellites.
STS-51G in 1985 deployed and retrieved the SPARTAN satellite; STS-34
in 1989 deployed the Galileo spacecraft to explore Jupiter; and
STS-43 in 1991 deployed the fifth Tracking and Data Relay Satellite
(TDRS-E). Her fourth shuttle mission, STS-58 in 1993, focused on
medical experiments and engineering tests.

Lucid traveled aboard Atlantis on STS-76 in March 1996 to the Russian
Mir space station. She performed numerous life science and physical
science experiments during the course of her stay. She returned from
the station aboard Atlantis on STS-79 in September 1996.
In 2002, Lucid served as NASA's chief scientist at the agency's
headquarters in Washington. She returned to Johnson in the fall of
2003 and resumed technical assignments in the Astronaut Office. She
served as a Capcom in the Mission Control Center for numerous space
shuttle and space station crews, representing the flight crew office
and providing a friendly voice for dozens of friends and colleagues
in space.

For Lucid's complete biography, visit:

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/Bios/htmlbios/lucid.html
Jacques :-)

Offline Space Pete

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1992 on: 01/31/2012 08:14 pm »
At this rate, there won't be any old vets left in the astronaut office... :(
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Online Chris Bergin

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1993 on: 01/31/2012 08:29 pm »
That's a big one. Legend!
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Offline larmeyers

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1994 on: 02/02/2012 01:37 am »
Shannon Lucid was the iconic capcom after a magnificent flight history.  Of course she was there to do the wake-up call on STS-135 landing day. I think I saw her on NASA TV working on an ISS shift in January.  I'd love to know if there is any audio or video of her final sign-off to the next orbit team.

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1995 on: 02/03/2012 04:10 pm »
RELEASE: 12-041

NASA RECEIVES SECOND HIGHEST NUMBER OF ASTRONAUT APPLICATIONS

HOUSTON -- More than 6,300 individuals applied to become a NASA
astronaut between Nov. 15, 2011 and Jan. 27, the second highest
number of applications ever received by the agency. After a thorough
selection process, which includes interviews and medical
examinations, nine to 15 people will be selected to become part of
the 21st astronaut class.

"This is a great time to join the NASA family," NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden said. "Our newest astronauts could launch aboard the
first commercial rockets to the space station the next generation of
scientists and engineers who will help us reach higher and create an
American economy that is built to last."


The Astronaut Selection Office staff will review the applications to
identify those meeting the minimum requirements. Next, an expanded
team, comprised mostly of active astronauts, will review those
applications to determine which ones are highly qualified. Those
individuals will be invited to Johnson Space Center for in-person
interviews and medical evaluations.

"We will be looking for people who really stand out," said Peggy
Whitson, chief of the Astronaut Office at NASA's Johnson Space Center
and chair of the Astronaut Selection Board. "Our team not only will
be looking at their academic background and professional
accomplishments but also at other elements of their personality and
character traits -- what types of hobbies they have or unique life
experiences. We want and need a mix of individuals and skills for
this next phase of human exploration."

NASA expects to announce a final selection of astronaut candidates in
the spring of 2013.

The selected astronaut candidates will have two years of initial
training. Subjects will include space station systems, Russian
language and spacewalking skills training. Those who complete the
training will be assigned technical duties within the Astronaut
Office at Johnson and, ultimately, missions.

Typically, the agency receives between 2,500 and 3,500 applicants for
astronaut vacancy announcements. The highest response occurred in
1978 with 8,000 applicants.

For more information about NASA astronauts, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/flynasa.html
Jacques :-)

Online Chris Bergin

Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1996 on: 02/03/2012 05:14 pm »
"This is a great time to join the NASA family," NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden said. "Our newest astronauts could launch aboard the
first commercial rockets to the space station the next generation of
scientists and engineers who will help us reach higher and create an
American economy that is built to last."

WTF? (Win The Future).

Someone show him the door, for pity's sake!
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Offline SpaceInformer

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1997 on: 02/03/2012 07:12 pm »
WTF? Want to Fly??  ;D ;D ;D no vehicle available

Offline Ben E

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1998 on: 02/03/2012 08:14 pm »
Excessively cynical, methinks.

After all, only 9-15 astronauts are being selected. In 1978 and 1980, two far larger groups of astronauts (almost 60 in total) were selected for a new programme. Their 'vehicle' - the Shuttle - was going to be unavailable for 2 more years. Similarly, Apollo-era astronauts waited more than a decade apiece to fly. The job of an astronaut entails far more than simply waiting for the next available rocket. Ask Story Musgrave.

Offline arkaska

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Re: Flight crew assignments
« Reply #1999 on: 02/03/2012 08:40 pm »
"This is a great time to join the NASA family," NASA Administrator
Charles Bolden said. "Our newest astronauts could launch aboard the
first commercial rockets to the space station the next generation of
scientists and engineers who will help us reach higher and create an
American economy that is built to last."

WTF? (Win The Future).

Someone show him the door, for pity's sake!

Not if the plans they currently have are followed. The candidates won't be finished with basic training until 2015 and add 2-3 years for specific mission training leaves an earliest launch of 2017-2018. Commercial should be up and running then (with 4 USOS spots on ISS) and SLS would be around the corner.

I know that it is far from certain that Commercial and SLS will be available on the current timeline but they can't shoot themselves in the foot and say otherwise before actual delays happens.

So in all if they are ready for a mission in 2017 I would say that is a great time since their flight opportunities are 5-6 years in the future. It is a completely different thing for the astronauts currently serving, they have to wait a number of years for a domestic launch.
« Last Edit: 02/03/2012 08:42 pm by arkaska »

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