Author Topic: China's space program  (Read 415783 times)

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #860 on: 11/30/2018 04:38 am »
Looks like a solid launch vehicle for LinkSure 1, so might be CZ-11.
« Last Edit: 11/30/2018 04:38 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #861 on: 12/08/2018 05:47 am »
Short animation showing CZ-8 first stage being recovered.

https://www.weibo.com/tv/v/H1y8QxIy3
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Lars-J

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4731
  • California
  • Liked: 4430
  • Likes Given: 2689
Re: China's space program
« Reply #862 on: 12/11/2018 12:24 am »
Short animation showing CZ-8 first stage being recovered.

https://www.weibo.com/tv/v/H1y8QxIy3

I suspect the Chinese are having second thought about this ungainly triple booster arrangement after seeing the CRS-16 landing. It's not as easy as SpaceX makes it look... Lots of ways for things to go south from aerodynamic factors, especially with a complex shape like this.

But I wish them the best, it will be a sight to see if they pull it off! :)
« Last Edit: 12/11/2018 12:24 am by Lars-J »

Offline Comet

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 283
  • Liked: 60
  • Likes Given: 19
Re: China's space program
« Reply #863 on: 12/11/2018 08:37 am »

Offline Satori

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 12835
  • Braga - Portugal
    • Em Órbita
  • Liked: 571
  • Likes Given: 368
Re: China's space program
« Reply #864 on: 12/11/2018 02:31 pm »


What is the video about? Can you please write something about it?

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #865 on: 12/12/2018 05:22 am »
What is the video about? Can you please write something about it?

Its the CZ-8 entry and landing video that I linked to previously.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #866 on: 12/23/2018 12:10 am »
Here are some flyers (from about 25 years ago) on the CZ-2C, CZ-3 and CZ-4.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11599
  • Liked: 3151
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: China's space program
« Reply #867 on: 12/23/2018 09:05 pm »
https://www.technologyreview.com/s/612595/china-launched-more-rockets-into-orbit-in-2018-than-any-other-country/?fbclid=IwAR2qSfDk68kyG-uQjHJ2sjDsEYKzZ3ekszlMR7d5sRxGl5tMlp8_KTEMPhA

I know the author and she is sharp. I quibble with a few things with this statement:

"China is also developing a space telescope that will have the same resolution as the Hubble—with a field of view 300 times larger. The telescope will be placed in orbit close to the space station, so that Chinese astronauts can quickly service the instrument should problems arise. CALT has learned from NASA’s mistakes—it took over three years for NASA to fix Hubble’s flawed mirror."

Hubble has a 2.4-meter mirror, and what I've read is that the Chinese telescope will have a 2.0-meter mirror, so I don't see how it could have the same resolution. Also, with Hubble, servicing time had less to do with the ability to reach the telescope than with the time required to build replacement instruments and train to install them. I'm not sure that the Chinese approach is necessarily "better," because if they are going to upgrade instruments and replace gyros from their space station, they still have to carry that equipment up to their space station in the first place. Plus, if they are operating their telescope in a lower orbit (near their space station), that will impact its operations.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #868 on: 12/24/2018 01:14 am »
Hubble has a 2.4-meter mirror, and what I've read is that the Chinese telescope will have a 2.0-meter mirror, so I don't see how it could have the same resolution.

I believe she is sourcing this Chinese article.

http://www.xinhuanet.com//english/2016-04/21/c_135300787.htm

"Zhou Jianping, chief engineer of China's manned space program, told Xinhua in March said the telescope would feature a 2-meter-diameter lens. With the same precision as Hubble but a field of view that is 300 times larger, the telescope could capture 40 percent of space within ten years, Zhou said."

Yes, difficult to understand how a 2 m telescope has the same precision as a 2.4 m telescope. I also wonder if there is a parallel military program, to use the technology for looking in the other direction. The wide field of view could be an indication of that.

Quote
Also, with Hubble, servicing time had less to do with the ability to reach the telescope than with the time required to build replacement instruments and train to install them. I'm not sure that the Chinese approach is necessarily "better," because if they are going to upgrade instruments and replace gyros from their space station, they still have to carry that equipment up to their space station in the first place. Plus, if they are operating their telescope in a lower orbit (near their space station), that will impact its operations.

One advantage is that spares can be kept on the space station. If for example some gyros fail, they can be quickly replaced. The telescope will probably need some form of propulsion to maintain its orbit close to that of the station. Perhaps using electric propulsion so as to provide a clean exhaust.
« Last Edit: 12/24/2018 01:16 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Phil Stooke

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 546
  • Canada
  • Liked: 365
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: China's space program
« Reply #869 on: 12/24/2018 01:30 am »
The precision could be pointing accuracy.  A wide field of view is good for sky surveys, something HST is not designed for.   Different designs, different purposes.

Offline Sizzy

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
  • Canton China mainland
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: China's space program
« Reply #870 on: 12/25/2018 01:25 pm »

Offline TrevorMonty

Re: China's space program
« Reply #871 on: 12/25/2018 07:19 pm »
Chinese new plan to the moon
http://news.sciencenet.cn/sbhtmlnews/2018/12/341836.shtm?id=341836
I could find any thing in article on moon, maybe google translator missed it.

Offline Phillip Clark

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2490
  • Hastings, England
  • Liked: 465
  • Likes Given: 995
Re: China's space program
« Reply #872 on: 12/25/2018 09:09 pm »
Chinese new plan to the moon
http://news.sciencenet.cn/sbhtmlnews/2018/12/341836.shtm?id=341836
I could find any thing in article on moon, maybe google translator missed it.

Developing a new format of the land and space economic zone
 

■ This reporter trainee reporter Zhao Lili

"For sixty years, China's spaceflight has achieved brilliant achievements represented by 'two bombs and one star', manned spaceflight and lunar exploration. It is among the world's space powers and is accelerating to become a space power." Academician of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, International Aerospace When the academician of the Academy of Sciences Bao Weimin talked about the achievements of China's space science and technology at the China High-tech Industrialization Summit held recently, the pride is beyond words.

In recent years, the overall capacity and technical level of China's aerospace has been continuously improved. As far as technology is concerned, China has developed a Type 15 Long March series of launch vehicles, which initially has a relatively complete carrying capacity. Our country's launch vehicles have achieved a leap from conventional to low temperature, from single-stage series to bundling, from single-single to multi-star, from launching satellites to launching manned spacecraft, from launching earth-orbiting satellites to launching deep-space detectors. Development, with the basic ability to send spacecraft to extraterrestrial space.

As of November 14, 2018, the Long March series of launch vehicles launched 290 times, with a success rate of over 96% and annual launch times of more than 30 times, ranking the world's leading level.

Then, as one of the representatives of the national high-tech strategic industry, how can China's space technology be transformed into national productivity? Or how to contribute to economic development? This actually involves the transfer and transformation of aerospace scientific and technological achievements.

Aerospace market demand continues to grow

At present, the world's space science and technology has achieved vigorous development in the areas of space resource development, energy utilization, on-orbit manufacturing, medical and health, and space tourism. Major projects represented by a new generation of global communications satellites, large-scale Internet constellations, large-scale space infrastructure, manned lunar exploration and manned Mars exploration represent the advent of the “new era” of space.

This "new era" is not only an upgrade of aerospace science and technology innovation, but also a profound integration of aerospace technology and society and the national economy. As Bao Weimin said, the development of global aerospace science and technology is showing the characteristics of commercialization, industrialization and scale.

Internationally, the demand for satellites in the sun-synchronous orbit is strong; the mission of small satellites is a spurt development; more than 200 companies are targeting the space market of the Earth and Moon, including space resource development and on-orbit manufacturing. In China, high-orbit satellites are developing towards integration and large-scale development; medium- and low-orbit satellites are developing towards clustering and miniaturization; China has proposed several constellation plans with a total number of more than 1,000; key universities and some private enterprises have entered small and medium-sized satellites. market.

The United States, China, Europe, and Japan have launched tens of thousands of tons of solar power plant construction plans. In addition, manned spaceflight has gradually become commercialized, and a large number of private companies have participated in the field of space tourism, and the space field is extremely active.

“The future aerospace business will shift from a single government investment to an open commercial competition. The large-scale constellation of commercial earth orbit and the space infrastructure construction represented by solar power plants are growing in demand.” Bao Weimin said. In his view, the demand for manned space missions such as space stations, manned lunar exploration, space tourism, and on-orbit research, production, and testing will continue to grow, and space resources such as the moon and asteroids, space utilization, energy production, and on-orbit manufacturing. The new industry has become an international hot spot.

Space economy will focus on the moon space

The aerospace industry is increasingly connected with the development of the national economy, and the aerospace industry has entered a new era of space economy. Bao Weimin believes that, among them, the Earth and Moon space will become the main area of ​​the space economy and the strategic space for development in the future for a long time.

Bao Weimin said that countries have maintained a high level of enthusiasm for deep space exploration, and emerging space nations are constantly influx, but the target focuses on three types of celestial bodies such as the moon, asteroids and Mars.

The scale of the Earth and Moon space mission continues to expand. According to relevant research by the International Academy of Astronautics, by 2045, the space mission will reach 170,000 tons, of which 97% will be concentrated in the Earth and Moon space, and 100% from the Earth and Moon space.

The University of Colorado study shows that the development of geospatial resources based on the current state of the art is expected to be as high as $105.1 billion in direct assets that could be developed by 2046. Not only that, but the subsequent value increment will increase.

Bao Weimin believes that for a long time to come, the Earth and Moon space will remain the main destination and outpost for space mission activities, and manned spaceflight will further focus on the Earth and Moon space.

The normalized, flight-oriented transportation, detection, development, and utilization of the economic activity circle of the Earth's space are called the Earth and Moon Space Economic Zone by the industry, and its scope is mainly concentrated in the near-Earth space, the lunar gravitational space, and the Earth-moon transfer space.

According to reports, the format of the Earth and Moon Space Economic Zone includes basic industries, application industries, development and utilization industries, and expansion of industries. It consists of three major systems: the space-based space transportation system, the space resource detection and development system, and the space infrastructure system.

Road map for the construction of China's geo-month economic zone

In order to realize the vision of aerospace power in 2045, China will build a space transportation, detection and infrastructure system for the land and moon, form a low-cost monthly space flight transportation capacity, and an efficient space resource development and utilization capacity to fully form the Earth and Moon Space Economic Zone. New format.

How to promote China's "going to the earth" space? Bao Weimin showed the road map: the first stage, further improve the basic space capacity and reduce costs; the second stage, build a flight transportation system, establish a space transportation system for the earth and the earth, and initially establish a space economic zone; the third stage In 2045, all economic zones were built.

The first major project of flightization was the aerospace world transportation system. For example, Bao Weimin said, "At that time, using the flight, you can reach the world within 40 minutes."

Bao Weimin said that it is estimated that by 2046, our annual gross output value in the Gejiu Economic Zone will reach at least 10 trillion US dollars.

"So, the development of the Earthly Economic Zone will inevitably lead to major changes, which will bring great benefits and will also change our current socio-economic model." Bao Weimin said.

Chinese Journal of Science (2018-12-13 7th Edition Industry)
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Offline Sizzy

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
  • Canton China mainland
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: China's space program
« Reply #873 on: 12/26/2018 08:21 am »
Some new pics about Chinese future manned lunar plan
(by China Manned Space Agency)
 
« Last Edit: 12/26/2018 02:22 pm by Sizzy »

Offline JSz

  • Member
  • Posts: 43
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: China's space program
« Reply #874 on: 12/26/2018 12:33 pm »
Some new pics about Chinese future manned lunar plan
(by China Manned Space Agency)

Where exactly did you find these pictures in the CMSA site?
« Last Edit: 12/26/2018 12:36 pm by JSz »

Offline Sizzy

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
  • Canton China mainland
  • Liked: 25
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: China's space program
« Reply #875 on: 12/27/2018 02:48 am »
Some new pics about Chinese future manned lunar plan
(by China Manned Space Agency)

Where exactly did you find these pictures in the CMSA site?

CMSA doesn't pose this ppt on the official site
Here's a link that posed that pictures above
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=46821.0

More additional pics

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11599
  • Liked: 3151
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: China's space program
« Reply #876 on: 12/28/2018 07:06 pm »
One advantage is that spares can be kept on the space station. If for example some gyros fail, they can be quickly replaced. The telescope will probably need some form of propulsion to maintain its orbit close to that of the station. Perhaps using electric propulsion so as to provide a clean exhaust.

I don't see that as an advantage. The smart way to do it is to provide redundant gyros and then plan to replace them at regular servicing intervals when you bring up new instruments to install. I doubt that putting a gyro up at the space station as a spare and then having it sit there for years at a time does anything for reliability--how confident will you be that it will work as planned after sitting in orbit unused for years?

I think they are using their station as the servicing platform because it is available, and it is a more feasible servicing platform than taking up a Shenzhou alone and trying to do complex EVAs from that. It's making do with what they have, but I don't see any inherent advantages over the way that NASA serviced Hubble with shuttle. One exception could be that they may have more arms on their station, allowing at least some of the servicing work to be done robotically.

Offline Coastal Ron

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4426
  • I live... along the coast
  • Liked: 3073
  • Likes Given: 4183
Re: China's space program
« Reply #877 on: 12/28/2018 07:19 pm »
Some new pics about Chinese future manned lunar plan
(by China Manned Space Agency)

The "New Generation Manned Spacecraft" sure looks a lot like a Drago Cargo vehicle.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18705
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6706
  • Likes Given: 924
Re: China's space program
« Reply #878 on: 01/03/2019 06:45 am »
Anyone recognise these satellites from the video below? Grabs taken at 7:37 into the video.

Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline limen4

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 285
  • Liked: 70
  • Likes Given: 11
Re: China's space program
« Reply #879 on: 01/03/2019 08:28 am »
GaoJing-1 (03 and 04)

Tags: