Author Topic: Project Orion to Mars - video  (Read 8196 times)

Offline SteveMick

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Re: Project Orion to Mars - video
« Reply #20 on: 01/18/2007 07:24 PM »
If you can acheive thermonuclear reactions that way in a controlled environment - sure. I am however  unaware of any technique to do this using plutonium in a fission reactor. Remanufacturing the plutonium used to trigger a fusion blast would yeild a small fraction ( 1% ? ) of the energy potential of a given bomb.
Steve

Offline kevin-rf

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Re: Project Orion to Mars - video
« Reply #21 on: 01/19/2007 01:43 AM »
It's not all about the energy released, it is all about what fraction of the energy released can be captured and used in a useable form.

Depend on my mood I waiver between pro and anti nuke... they have some great pluses and some scary negatives. Fission and RTG's are real and proven, anything else needs to be looked at very carefully first.

Call me a doubting thomas on fusion...

If you're happy and you know it,
It's your med's!

Offline SteveMick

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Re: Project Orion to Mars - video
« Reply #22 on: 01/19/2007 04:36 PM »
I'm puzzled by your response. Nuclear fusion of the kind I'm referring to was acheived and tested in the late Forties or early Fifties when we detonated our first thermonuclear weapon - there's really nothing to doubt. Huge amounts of money, time, effort have been expended to acheive fusion by means other than fission as in a bomb. I have long thought this was a waste if the desire is just to make electricity since the problem is really one of scale. While using fission to trigger fusion is not ideal, compared with a fission reactor only 1% or so of the waste is produced per given amount of energy.
 I did refer to the idea as "wacko" and I share your ambivalence about nuclear power in any form.
Steve

Offline publiusr

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Re: Project Orion to Mars - video
« Reply #23 on: 02/02/2007 09:36 PM »
According to the book by Freeman Dysons son, the Saturn V could loft 400 tons or so to the edge of the atmosphere. Sea Dragon might be perfect for a revived Orion.

An NSWR would give you a smoother ride--perhaps with 1g thrust. But it would have thermal issues.

On the flip side--it would be a simpler rocket. A Sea Dragon only needs a little bit of kero for the first stage--and some of the uranium salts for the payload. The rest of the reaction mass comes from the ocean.

Instant starship---just add water.

http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/rocket3c2.html#nswr
http://www.npl.washington.edu/AV/altvw56.html

According to this chart:
http://www.projectrho.com/rocket/RocketChart01Work.pdf
An 80% solution pretty much outperforms everything else. High thrust and IsP both. Unique.

And all you really need is fuel injection technology.

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