Author Topic: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion  (Read 57673 times)

Offline Ken the Bin

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2806
  • US Pacific Time Zone
    • @kenthebin@spacey.space
  • Liked: 5230
  • Likes Given: 5685
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #180 on: 01/19/2024 09:51 pm »
NASA press release: https://www.nasa.gov/news-release/nasa-science-astrobotic-peregrine-mission-one-concludes/

Note: Images converted from .webp to .png for compatibility.

Quote from: NASA
NASA Science, Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One Concludes

(Image 1 goes here.
Caption: "Cameras aboard Peregrine capture the American flag and the NASA insignia on one of the lander’s tanks to signify America’s return to the Moon.
Credits: Astrobotic")

The first flight of NASA’s commercial lunar delivery service carrying agency science and technology, as well as other customer payloads intended for the Moon, has come to an end. After 10 days and 13 hours in space, Astrobotic’s Peregrine Mission One made a controlled re-entry on Earth over open water in the South Pacific at approximately 4:04 p.m. EST on Jan. 18.

Astrobotic was the first commercial vendor to launch a mission to the Moon as part of NASA’s CLPS (Commercial Lunar Payload Services) initiative, which aims to advance capabilities for science, exploration or commercial development of the Moon under the agency’s Artemis campaign. There are seven additional CLPS deliveries awarded to multiple American companies, with more awards expected this year and for years to come. The next CLPS commercial flight is targeted for no earlier than February.

Following a successful launch and separation from the rocket on Jan. 8, the spacecraft experienced a propulsion issue preventing Peregrine from softly landing on the Moon. After analysis and recommendations from NASA and the space community, Astrobotic determined the best option for minimizing risk and ensuring responsible disposal of the spacecraft would be to maintain Peregrine’s trajectory toward Earth, where it burned up upon re-entry.

(Image 2 goes here.
Caption: "(L-R) Hailey Moosebrugger, payload manager, Astrobotic, works with project scientists Maria Banks and Paul Niles, CLPS in Astrobotic’s control center.
Credits: Astrobotic")

“Space exploration is a daring task, and the science and spaceflight data collected from Astrobotic’s lunar lander is better preparing NASA for future CLPS deliveries and crewed missions under Artemis,” said NASA Administrator Bill Nelson. “The future of exploration is strengthened by collaboration. Together with our commercial partners, NASA is supporting a growing commercial space economy that will help take humanity back to the Moon, and beyond.”

Four out five NASA payloads on Peregrine successfully powered on and collected data while in flight:

    Linear Energy Transfer Spectrometer (LETS)
    Near-Infrared Volatile Spectrometer System (NIRVSS)
    Neutron Spectrometer System (NSS)
    Peregrine Ion-Trap Mass Spectrometer (PITMS)

As NASA’s LRA (Laser Retroreflector Array) instrument is a passive experiment, and operations could only take place on the lunar surface.

NASA science teams are currently working to interpret the results. Preliminary data suggests the instruments have measured natural radiation and chemical compounds in the area around the lander.

“Astrobotic’s Peregrine mission provided an invaluable opportunity to test our science and instruments in space, optimizing our process for collecting data and providing a benchmark for future missions,” said Nicola Fox, associate administrator for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington. “The data collected in flight sets the stage for understanding how some of our instruments may behave in the harsh environment of space when some of the duplicates fly on future CLPS flights.”

NASA is committed to supporting its U.S. commercial vendors as they navigate the challenges of sending science and technology to the surface of the Moon.

For more information about CLPS, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/clps

-end-

Offline JAFO

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1035
    • My hobby
  • Liked: 877
  • Likes Given: 972
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #181 on: 01/19/2024 10:27 pm »
Web version of the update:
https://www.astrobotic.com/final-update-for-peregrine-mission-one/

Caption for the second video: "Carnegie Mellon University’s Iris rover waves goodbye."

damn allergies...
Anyone can do the job when things are going right. In this business we play for keeps.
— Ernest K. Gann

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11700
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 9338
  • Likes Given: 8066
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #182 on: 01/19/2024 11:27 pm »
Web version of the update:
https://www.astrobotic.com/final-update-for-peregrine-mission-one/

Caption for the second video: "Carnegie Mellon University’s Iris rover waves goodbye."

damn allergies...


Understand JAFO,   It's not just a mission they lost,  It's more like a family member who died.   
« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:28 pm by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...and no, I'm not a Feline Dealer!!

Offline JAFO

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1035
    • My hobby
  • Liked: 877
  • Likes Given: 972
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #183 on: 01/19/2024 11:30 pm »
Web version of the update:
https://www.astrobotic.com/final-update-for-peregrine-mission-one/

Caption for the second video: "Carnegie Mellon University’s Iris rover waves goodbye."

damn allergies...


Understand JAFO,   It's not just a mission they lost,  It's more like a family member who died.   

Ummm...... WADR, No. Let's not get carried away.
« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:30 pm by JAFO »
Anyone can do the job when things are going right. In this business we play for keeps.
— Ernest K. Gann

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11700
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 9338
  • Likes Given: 8066
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #184 on: 01/19/2024 11:35 pm »
OK, JAFO I understand. I had friends who lost missions at JPL, It's hard when you work almost all your career and lose the mission.  But, I can also liven this up too.

https://twitter.com/daily_hopper/status/1748447906045046851
« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:39 pm by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...and no, I'm not a Feline Dealer!!

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11700
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 9338
  • Likes Given: 8066
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #185 on: 01/19/2024 11:41 pm »
Video made up a sequential pictures, watch the rover wheels.

https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1748448447475159476

« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:51 pm by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...and no, I'm not a Feline Dealer!!

Offline JAFO

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1035
    • My hobby
  • Liked: 877
  • Likes Given: 972
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #186 on: 01/19/2024 11:44 pm »
Video made up a sequential pictures, watch the rover wheels.

https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1748448447475159476


:respect:

Wish they had let the rovers loose to fly before reentry, on the off chance they might have been able to capture an image of the lander and transmit it back down. YOLO!!
« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:44 pm by JAFO »
Anyone can do the job when things are going right. In this business we play for keeps.
— Ernest K. Gann

Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11700
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 9338
  • Likes Given: 8066
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #187 on: 01/19/2024 11:54 pm »
Video made up a sequential pictures, watch the rover wheels.

https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1748448447475159476


:respect:

Wish they had let the rovers loose to fly before reentry, on the off chance they might have been able to capture an image of the lander and transmit it back down. YOLO!!

Were you the one to suggest that earlier? I agree, I was half expecting that to occur.  What's to lose.

Thanks JAFO.
« Last Edit: 01/19/2024 11:54 pm by catdlr »
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...and no, I'm not a Feline Dealer!!

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48461
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82192
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #188 on: 01/20/2024 12:06 pm »


Quote
🚀 Welcome to an Unforgettable Space Adventure: Join us as we dive into the gripping narrative of the Peregrine Mission One Lunar Lander's journey. It's an epic tale of technological marvels, unexpected twists, and the indomitable spirit of exploration.

🛰️ Peregrine's Challenges in Space: The mission quickly transformed from routine to remarkable, presenting a series of challenges that tested the mettle of the Peregrine lander and its handlers.

🔧 The Technical Hurdles: Delve into the complexities faced by the mission, including issues with sun-pointing orientation and propulsion system failures. We analyze the critical moments that defined Peregrine's fate and the ingenious efforts to salvage the mission.

🌟 Astrobotic's Future Endeavors: Looking ahead, Astrobotic is poised for more lunar missions, with lessons learned from Peregrine set to enhance future endeavors like the Griffin Mission. Join us in anticipating what the future holds for this trailblazing space company.

Offline Holger Isenberg

  • Member
  • Posts: 22
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #189 on: 01/29/2024 05:08 pm »
I'm still searching for the engineering reason Peregrine 1 had to follow this detour with an extra loop (phasing loop) adding 10 days to the trip and then 1 month for the slowly lowering of the lunar orbit.

The spacecraft dry mass and fuel amount was almost identical to Surveyor 1 which achieved the first soft powered landing on the Moon ever on June 2 1966. The Centaur stage for boosting from LEO towards the Moon was also comparable for both, even more advanced for Peregrine 1.

Was the landing engine not powerful enough for a quick 3-day direct trajectory like in 1966?

Or what's the technical reason they used this extra loop with periapsis at lunar distance?

https://twitter.com/meithan42/status/1744395867157561503

Offline sdsds

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7214
  • “With peace and hope for all mankind.”
  • Seattle
  • Liked: 2059
  • Likes Given: 1973
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #190 on: 01/29/2024 07:11 pm »
Great animation; thanks for sharing it.

Real life video of the final maneuvers from 18 Jan.
https://twitter.com/s2a_systems/status/1748086243311702068
— 𝐬𝐝𝐒𝐝𝐬 —

Offline sdsds

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 7214
  • “With peace and hope for all mankind.”
  • Seattle
  • Liked: 2059
  • Likes Given: 1973
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #191 on: 01/29/2024 07:16 pm »
I'm still searching for the engineering reason Peregrine 1 had to follow this detour [...]

Pretty clear it was an Astrobotic choice, not required given the performance of Vulcan. It allowed them to:
a. take plenty of time to do spacecraft and comms checkout
b. perform minor trajectory adjustment maneuvers, particularly at first apogee
c. test the long-duration capability of TALOS thrusters
d. ?
— 𝐬𝐝𝐒𝐝𝐬 —

Offline Phil Stooke

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1358
  • Canada
  • Liked: 1426
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #192 on: 01/29/2024 07:56 pm »
I'm still searching for the engineering reason Peregrine 1 had to follow this detour ... Or what's the technical reason they used this extra loop with periapsis at lunar distance?

It's not a detour.  Most recent missions have followed the same kind of path, either a big loop out by Sun-Earth L1 or L2 or with large phasing orbits.  As said above, it provides lots of time for trajectory refinement and testing.  The fast routes to the Moon in the 1960s were more to do with fears about reliability.  Most of these longer routes are also more fuel-efficient.  Look at CAPSTONE, GRAIL, HAKUTO-R, and many others.
« Last Edit: 01/29/2024 10:38 pm by zubenelgenubi »

Offline ccdengr

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 668
  • Liked: 493
  • Likes Given: 74
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #193 on: 01/29/2024 09:22 pm »
Surveyor killed most of its velocity using a large, high-thrust solid motor.  I suspect that current landers have less delta-V, and certainly less thrust.

Offline Holger Isenberg

  • Member
  • Posts: 22
  • Liked: 8
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Astrobotic Peregrine Mission One - Updates & Discussion
« Reply #194 on: 01/30/2024 04:08 am »
I should have read the vendor's manual...

In https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43448.740 someone else started a related discussion and pointed out https://www.astrobotic.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/PUGLanders_011222.pdf which states:
 * Cruise phase: 3 - 33 days.
 * Lunar orbit phase: 4 - 25 days.

Which means both answer above are correct, because Peregrine's main engines are by far not that powerful as Surveyor's giant solid fuel motor, but Peregrine can reach lunar orbit at least without the additional orbit loop.

Peregrine 1:
combined 5 engines sum: 750 lb force (340kg force, 3335N)
450 kg (990 lb) of hypergolic bi-propellant mass MON-25/MMH

Surveyor:
9000-pound-thrust (4082 kg force, 40000N)
Star 37 engine, 620 total weight, 560kg propellant: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Star_(rocket_stage)
burned for 39 seconds at 75 km altitude slowing down from 9400 km/h to 430 km/h
81 kg liquid fuel for the final 3 landing thrusters





Online catdlr

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11700
  • Enthusiast since the Redstones
  • Marina del Rey, California, USA
  • Liked: 9338
  • Likes Given: 8066
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...and no, I'm not a Feline Dealer!!

Tags:
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
1