Author Topic: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander  (Read 262292 times)

Offline spacexplorer

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #660 on: 02/26/2024 05:24 am »
Beagle 2 appears to have landed and partly deployed.  No crater.  By the standards of IM-1 maybe we should call it a success?

Well, if we scale 'partial success' from 1-10, Beagle probably scores 1  :)

It impacted too hard and sent no data back. For all practical purposes, it crashed.

I think you are confusing with another mission, beagle2 landed safely and started deployement, then a solar petal got stuck.  Some genius decided that the only antenna had to be under the last petal... so Beagle 2 is still there, awaiting for instructions from ground control...(ok, it's frozen, it's just to give an idea).

Offline deltaV

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #661 on: 02/26/2024 05:41 am »
Has there been any “official” update given since Friday’s press conference?  The last daily update on the IM web page was Friday, and I don’t find anything on the NASA pages either.

People tend to work less during weekends unless there's something urgent. Our curiosity may be urgent for us but it may not be urgent for IM. So try waiting for Monday.

Online Lampyridae

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #662 on: 02/26/2024 06:50 am »

The British gave you radar.

In fact, one of our very own, Arthur C. Clarke helped to develop it!

I thought he did GCA (Ground Controlled Approach), the system used to talk pilots down through poor visibility, rather than radar itself.  Either way, I'm grateful and acknowledge the contribution and thoroughly enjoyed his book Glide Path which was a semi-autobiographical book about that work.


Way off topic, but Heinlein, Asimov and de Camp worked at the Naval Aeronautical Research Laboratory in Philadelphia. Asimov did chemistry, de Camp did some hydraulics work and became an officer, and Heinlein was involved with among other things, pressure suit testing. Heinlein also made a big stink about there not being enough female engineers, and got in trouble for refusing to fake data for a plexiglass canopy. They also contributed some ideas on the Combat Information Centre but it was a bit of a stretch to say they worked on that (which at the time was top secret and regarded as something out of science fiction).

Which neatly brings us full circle to Intuitive Machines' neatly laid out control centre. The central circle allowed Star Trek bridge-style interaction, while it looked like each team leader could look out at the screens of their own team, who could swivel to talk to them. Most of the small satellite/launcher control rooms I've seen so far tend to look like either like a small office or a smaller version of NASA theatre-like control rooms.
« Last Edit: 02/26/2024 09:28 am by Lampyridae »

Offline Starbeam

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #663 on: 02/26/2024 07:17 am »
To help fill the news vacuum about IM-1 here is another screenshot of a transmission at 2024-02-25 22:58:05 UTC. IM-1 is alive and ...
« Last Edit: 02/26/2024 07:19 am by Starbeam »

Online catdlr

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #664 on: 02/26/2024 08:33 am »
Some background info on the IM-1 antennas:

https://twitter.com/coastal8049/status/1757561924517020015

Quote
IM-1 has 4 hemispheric antennas and 1 high gain antenna
It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Online catdlr

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #665 on: 02/26/2024 08:34 am »
https://twitter.com/TM_Eubanks/status/1761857225075609857

Quote
Why the IM-1 signal is weak - none of the antennas are pointing at the Earth (i.e., the old top).

It's Tony De La Rosa, ...I don't create this stuff, I just report it.

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #666 on: 02/26/2024 10:33 am »
It's amazing that we haven't got an update for two days about an AMERICAN lunar mission (even though they said they'll provide an update at least once per day) so we have to rely on amateurs once again as we do for the Chinese missions. Seriously... if this continues to be the trend for Artemis/CLPS, I won't mind if the Chinese astronauts step on the Moon first. What would be different? 

Offline theonlyspace

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #667 on: 02/26/2024 11:47 am »
Where  are the pictures? Maybe the cameras are pointed down in the dirt??

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #668 on: 02/26/2024 11:53 am »
The only picture we've seen is this one (though not exactly a surface photo, but one at 10km height):

https://twitter.com/Int_Machines/status/1761170012847456573

It's a photo taken through a fisheye lens. Here's an attempt to dewarp it:

https://twitter.com/LJiam2020/status/1761542404715454710

Offline MRJC

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #669 on: 02/26/2024 12:38 pm »

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #670 on: 02/26/2024 12:48 pm »

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #671 on: 02/26/2024 12:50 pm »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #672 on: 02/26/2024 12:50 pm »
https://twitter.com/int_machines/status/1762111937490378942

Quote
Odysseus continues to communicate with flight controllers in Nova Control from the lunar surface. After understanding the end-to-end communication requirements, Odysseus sent images from the lunar surface of its vertical descent to its Malapert A landing site, representing the furthest south any vehicle has been able to land on the Moon and establish communication with ground controllers. 1/5 (26FEB2024 0745 CST)

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Odysseus captured this image approximately 35 seconds after pitching over during its approach to the landing site. The camera is on the starboard aft-side of the lander in this phase. 2/5 (26FEB2024 0745 CST)

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As part of Odysseus’ descent onto the lunar surface,  Hazard Relative Navigation algorithms detected nine safe landing sites within the targeted south pole region, which is an area that contains permanently shadowed regions that may be rich in resources, including water ice that could be used for future propulsion and life support on the Moon. 3/5 (26FEB2024 0745 CST)

Quote
Images from NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera team confirmed Odysseus completed its landing at 80.13°S and 1.44°E at a 2579 m elevation. After traveling more than 600,000 miles, Odysseus landed within 1.5 km of its intended Malapert A landing site, using a contingent laser range-finding system patched hours before landing. Image credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University. lroc.asu.edu/posts/1360 4/5 (26FEB2024 0745 CST)

https://twitter.com/int_machines/status/1762111945291755652

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Flight controllers intend to collect data until the lander’s solar panels are no longer exposed to light. Based on Earth and Moon positioning, we believe flight controllers will continue to communicate with Odysseus until Tuesday morning. Image credit: NASA/Goddard/Arizona State University. 5/5 (26FEB2024 0745 CST)

Offline ChrisC

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #673 on: 02/26/2024 01:17 pm »
LRO LROC photo: https://www.lroc.asu.edu/posts/1360

Caption text from one of those images:

Quote
Odysseus came to rest at 80.13°S, 1.44°E, 2579 m elevation, within a degraded one-kilometer diameter crater where the local terrain is sloped at a sporty 12°. The same image as above without the arrow; the image width is 973 meters, and the image was acquired on 24 February 2024 at 18:57 UTC (12:57 pm CST).

IM update above:
Quote
Based on Earth and Moon positioning, we believe flight controllers will continue to communicate with Odysseus until Tuesday morning.

That is sadly much shorter timeframe than the original 7-9 days, and I think this explains the lack of updates.  They are in the middle of furiously working to extract what data they can through the tiny soda straw of comm link that they do have, in the next (now) 24 hours.

As a former communications engineer (mostly satcom), and a longtime follower of comm strategies on Mars missions, I have Deep Thoughts, but I'll wait until later for that.  Godspeed IM -- we're all rooting for you.
« Last Edit: 02/26/2024 01:33 pm by ChrisC »
PSA #1: EST does NOT mean "Eastern Time".  Use "Eastern" or "ET" instead, all year round, and avoid this common error.  Google "EST vs EDT".
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Offline tolis

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #674 on: 02/26/2024 01:39 pm »
Seriously... if this continues to be the trend for Artemis/CLPS, I won't mind if the Chinese astronauts step on the Moon first.

That might happen anyway.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #675 on: 02/26/2024 01:43 pm »

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #676 on: 02/26/2024 01:44 pm »
Seriously... if this continues to be the trend for Artemis/CLPS, I won't mind if the Chinese astronauts step on the Moon first.

That might happen anyway.

It will be a sad day for western democracy, so let's hope CLPS and Starship work..

Offline Jim

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #677 on: 02/26/2024 01:49 pm »

no you don't, gravity is 1/6, arriving at low altitude at low speed is much easier on the moon, you can even easily hover.
The hard parth is last 10 meters, when you have to cope with boulders and dust and rocks and slopes, but airbags don't care any of them, they just bounce till stop.
These landers are unmanned.
If they were manned, landing would be much easier, being no need for automated landing without realtime feedback to ground control.

Wrong on many items.
Landing on the moon takes more delta V than landing on mars. You can't " arriving at low altitude at low speed" without braking and for the air bags to work.

These landers are automated.  There is no " realtime feedback to ground control.".  It is all done onboard.

Offline Jim

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #678 on: 02/26/2024 01:55 pm »
It's amazing that we haven't got an update for two days about an AMERICAN lunar mission (even though they said they'll provide an update at least once per day) so we have to rely on amateurs once again as we do for the Chinese missions. Seriously... if this continues to be the trend for Artemis/CLPS, I won't mind if the Chinese astronauts step on the Moon first. What would be different? 

Let it go.  Welcome to the future.  It is a commercial mission.  They have no requirement for daily updates.  Spaceflight is routine.  IM-1 lander can't move.  It only can send data and only a little at that.  Nothing has changed.  They are still figuring out things.
Do we get daily updates from Juno, JWST, LRO, etc?

edit. 
And asking at 6:33 am?  Nobody is going to do anything at that time.
« Last Edit: 02/26/2024 01:59 pm by Jim »

Offline saturnsky

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Re: IM-1 Odysseus lunar lander
« Reply #679 on: 02/26/2024 02:03 pm »
Great answer Jim!

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