Author Topic: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install - December 3rd, 2022 [Cassada, Rubio]  (Read 15824 times)

Offline cohberg

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ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
Return to nominal US EVAs
IROSA install #3

Scheduled for: December 3rd, 2022 7:25AM EST
Duration: ~7 hours
Primary Worksite: S4 Truss Segment / 3A Solar Array
EV1 (Red Stripe) : Cassada (2nd Spacewalk)
EV2: Rubio  (2nd Spacewalk)
EMU 3013: Cassada - Used on EVA-81 / 82? / 83?
EMU 3004: Rubio - Used on EVA-81 / 82? / 83?


News Updates

Quote from: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2022/12/01/astronauts-prepare-to-grow-tomatoes-get-ready-for-spacewalk/
Mann and Wakata later joined NASA astronauts Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio and continued preparing for a spacewalk planned to start at 7:25 a.m. EST on Saturday.

The roll-out-solar array, also known as an International Space Station Roll-Out Solar Array, or iROSA, was extracted from inside the SpaceX Dragon resupply ship’s unpressurized trunk by ground controllers remotely commanding the Canadarm2 robotic arm. The iROSA was then placed on a starboard truss structure attachment point.

Quote from: Rob Navias - Email (11/24/2022) to "Ben E"
Q: Have EVA crew members been identified yet for U.S. EVA-82 and 83?
A: Cassada and Rubio for the next two

Q: I understand from NASA's TV schedule that the iROSA EVAs have now moved to 3 Dec and NET 19 Dec...
A: We had to wait for the end of a beta angle cutout

Q: Many thanks. Can I also just check: is Cassada still EV1 and Rubio EV2, or will they swap?
A: Cass is EV1 and Rubio is EV2 for the next one and the swap designations for the one after that



Relevant Threads
ISS advanced solar array upgrades (iROSA)



U.S. Spacewalk 82 Animation - Dec. 3, 2022




Early DOUG EVA Steps
Quote from: Produced on 11/9 by CNG - Based on: US_EVA_3A_4A_IROSA_Install_v20
1.1 Pre EVA1 Configuration
1.3 ->EGRESS

1.4 ---->EV SSRMS Egress Airlock
1.5 ---->EV FF Transfer CL Bag to EV SSRMS to Stow on BRT
1.6 ---->EV FF Egress with Cable bag
1.7 ---->EV FF/EV SSRMS Translate to Green Hook location, EV FF Leads
1.8 ->F SE Prep
1.9 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to FSE Stanchion D
1.10 ---->EV SSRMS Stow CL Bag on Tower HR
1.11 ---->EV SSRMS Release R5 18-20 Turns
1.12 ->S4 Worksite Setup
1.13 ---->EV FF green hook on HR 3215, Stow Cable Bag on Starboard CETA Cart grid A
1.14 ---->EV FF Retrieve CL Bag, stow on BRT and translate to Mod Kit
1.15 ---->EV FF Stow CL Bag on left lower strut HR closest to mounting bracket
1.16 ->SSRMS SETUP
1.17 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to CETA Cart WIF 3, Stow APFR on BRT
1.18 ---->EV SSRMS Give SSRMS GO to APFR Install position, install APFR [12,PP,F,6]
1.19 ---->EV SSRMS Give SSRMS GO to APFR Ingress Position, ingress APFR
1.20 ->RELEASE ANTI ROTATION DEVICES
1.21 ---->EV FF Translate to FSE
1.22 ---->EV FF Translate to Tower HR, retrieve PGT
1.23 ---->EV FF translate to stanchion B, release R5 on lower IROSA
1.24 ---->EV FF Release C2, C1 Stop Block bolts and ARDs
1.25 ---->EV FF Stow Adj Equip Tether with ARDs in CL Bag
1.26 ->BREAK TORQUE ON IROSA FSE C1, C2 BOLTS
1.27 ---->EV FF Translate to and Release C1 less than .5 turns
1.28 ---->EV FF Translate to and release C2 (27 turns)
1.29 ---->EV FF Translate to Tower HR and retrieve scoop from CL bag
1.30 ---->EV FF Release C1 51-54 turns
1.31 ---->EV FF Install Scoop on Root Beam Microsquare near C1
1.32 ---->EV FF If time remaining, Release outermost bolt on all beams in priority order. C,A,D,B
1.33 ->RELEASE R BOLTS
1.34 ---->EV SSRMS Give SSRMS GO to for Upper R bolt Position
1.35 ---->EV SSRMS Release R1, R2 10-13 turns
1.36 ---->EV SSRMS Rotate (2) Boom Deployment System Rollers until 4 wheels contact boom
1.37 ---->EV SSRMS Release R3 and R4 appx 245 turns
1.38 ---->EV SSRMS Give SSRMS GO to IROSA Zenith Position
1.39 ---->EV FF Translate to Tower HR to Retrieve square scoop from CL Bag, position to release C2
1.40 ---->On EV SSRMS Go, EV FF release FSE bolt C2 (24-26 turns), then stow PGT
1.41 ---->EV FF Install Square Scoop on Root beam microsquare near C2, handle Zenith towards EV SSRMS
1.42 ---->EV FF Translate to tower D to assist with IROSA clearance to tower grapple fixture
1.43 ->IROSA RELEASE FROM FSE
1.44 ---->EV SSRMS Slide IROSA nadir to release from FSE Pin Slot interface
1.45 ---->EV FF give SSRMS GO for maneuver to Upper IROSA Backoff position
1.46 ---->SSRMS Maneuver to IROSA Install Position
1.47 ->IROSA INSTALL PREP STEPS
1.48 ---->EV FF Retrieve EV SSRMS Red Safety tether on the CETA HR at MM 6300, then translate to S4 Worksite
1.49 ---->EV FF Attach EV SSRMS Red Safety tether to S4 HR 2217
1.50 ---->EV FF Translate to left side of Mounting Bracket to position for IROSA install
1.51 ->IN STALL IROSA TO MOUNTING BRACKET
1.52 ---->EV SSRMS remove Scoop from Left side of IROSA
1.53 ---->Both crew Install IROSA onto Mounting Bracket
1.54 ---->EV SSRMS SSRMS GCA to R6 Position, remove scoop from Root Beam, and transfer scoops to EV FF
1.55 ->RELEASE FINAL HINGE RESTRAINT
1.56 ---->EV FF position to hold IROSA folded, EV SSRMS Release R6 (18-20 turns), stow PGT
1.57 ---->EV SSRMS Egress APFR at mounting bracket using ingress aid only
1.58 ---->EV SSRMS Give SSRMS GO to relocate to Backoff Position
1.59 ---->EV FF pivot IROSA to unfolded, EV SSRMS engage right side alignment tab and capture
1.60 ->DRIVE R7, R8
1.61 ---->EV SSRMS Drive Hinge bolts R7, R8 13 turns
1.62 ---->EV FF Stow Adj Equip tether with Scoops (2) in CL Bag
1.63 ---->EV FF Retrieve Adj Equip Tether, AM S knob, Cap Keeper from CL Bag transfer to EV SSRMS
1.64 ---->EV SSRMS Using AM S knob, finger tighten bolts til snug, then drive hinge bolts R7, R8
1.65 ---->EV SSRMS Remove caps from Mounting Bracket J1- J4, then P1-P4, stow on cap keeper
1.66 ---->EV FF Retrieve Adj Equip Tether, AMS Knob, Cap Keeper and stow in CL Bag
1.67 ---->EV SSRMS Tether swap to RED Hook from HR 2217
1.68 ---->EV SSRMS GCA SSRMS for APFR Reconfig, install APFR in SSRS [9, FF, K, 9]
1.69 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to mounting bracket
1.70 ---->EV FF Drive Left and Right Side Bolts M31-M38 (11-13 turns)
1.71 ---->EV SSRMS Mate Right Cables to IROSA
1.72 ---->EV FF Mate Left Cables to IROSA
1.73 ---->Both crew install cables to SAW
1.74 ->IROSA DEPLOY
1.75 ---->EV FF position near HR S5 2101
1.76 ---->EV SSRMS Configure PGT [B7, CCW2], Release R9, R10
1.77 ---->EV SSRMS wait for full deployment (approx. 6 min)
1.78 ---->EV SSRMS Configure PGT [A7, CCW2], Release R11, R12
1.79 ->CLEANUP
1.80 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to PORT CETA Cart
1.81 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to FSE Tower HR, perform socket swap
1.82 ---->EV FF Remove Square scoop from mounting bracket and stow in CL Bag, Stow CL Bag on BRT
1.83 ---->EV FF Stow CL Bag on Port CETA Cart Nadir HR
1.84 ->RELEASE ZENITH UPPER IROSA SUPPORT BEAM
1.85 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to FSE Stanchion C and release beam Restraint bolts C4, C3 (8-11 turns)
1.86 ---->EV FF Translate to Stanchion B and Release Beam Restraint Bolts C5, C6 (8-11 turns)
1.87 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to Stanchion A and Release Beam Restraint Bolts C7, C8 (8-11 turns)
1.88 ---->EV FF Rotate beam towards stanchion A (Nadir Outboard)
1.89 ---->Both crew tether zenith beam to F SE
1.90 ->RELEASE NADIR UPPER IROSA SUPPORT BEAM
1.91 ---->EV SSRMS Translate to Stanchion D and Release Beam Restraint bolt C10, C9 (8-11 turns)
1.92 ---->EV FF Translate to Stanchion C
1.93 ---->EV SSRMS Rotate Beam towards Stanchion C (C7 to EV FF)
1.94 ---->EV FF Handstart C7 (2-3 turns), then drive (25-27 turns)
1.95 ---->EV SSRMS Handstart C9, then drive (25-27 turns)
1.96 ---->EV SSRMS Retrieves CL Bag and Green Hooks then Translates to AL, EV FF then translates to AL
1.97 ---->Both crew Ingress AL

‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎  ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎ Like‎‏‏‎ ‎‏‏‎ ‎ Quote
« Last Edit: 12/03/2022 01:06 am by cohberg »

Offline Ben E

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #1 on: 11/25/2022 08:58 am »
For this EVA, Cassada is EV1 and Rubio is EV2.

Offline vp.

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #2 on: 11/25/2022 04:20 pm »
It's surprising to see Cassada and Rubio on the first 3 iRosa EVAs.
Won't Mann and Wakata do EVA?

Offline Ben E

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #3 on: 11/25/2022 05:13 pm »
Cassada/Rubio assignments for EVA-82 and 83 communicated to me by Rob Navias, earlier today.

EVs for the Jan EVA are yet to be announced.

Offline gemmy0I

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #4 on: 11/26/2022 10:02 pm »
It's surprising to see Cassada and Rubio on the first 3 iRosa EVAs.
Won't Mann and Wakata do EVA?
My guess is that the iROSA array installation EVAs require specialized training and are thus tied to a specific team per each expedition. It was the same way with the last set of iROSA array EVAs: for all three of them, Thomas Pesquet was EV-1 and Shane Kimbrough was EV-2. They didn't even alternate EV-1 and EV-2, which they normally like to do in multi-EVA sequences involving the same crew.

In general, there are two categories of EVAs. The first is called "skills-based", meaning (perhaps counterintuitively to the layperson) that the tasks to be done only require general skills in which all EVA-trained crew are expected to be proficient. For these, the crew have not necessarily done task-specific ground training for the particular EVA in the Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL), but can be expected to apply their general-purpose NBL training to specific tasks which are provided to them remotely via computer-based documentation in the lead-up to the EVA. These include most "station maintenance" tasks like replacing ORUs (batteries, power controllers, BCDUs, etc.), and the station is designed such that most unplanned contingency EVAs will fall into this category, allowing crew to undertake them on short notice. Since any EVA-trained crew can do these EVAs, NASA usually likes to rotate these opportunities (and the EV-1/EV-2 assignments) to give as many crew as possible a chance to get EVA experience in both roles.

We saw a ton of these "skills-based" EVAs over the last several years as all the battery replacements fell into this category. They were a real boon for 2013 class of astronauts (Group 21), many of whom were flying as rookies during that series. :)

The second type of EVA (there's a formal term for it but it escapes me at the moment) involves unusually complex or specialized tasks that the astronauts must specifically train for in the NBL before flying. The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) repairs conducted by Luca Parmitano and Drew Morgan during Expedition 61 (2019/20) fell under this category, which is why they always went out as a team (and always with Parmitano as EV-1 and Morgan as EV-2). There was concern that a new team would need to be trained if the final EVA had needed to be delayed into the next expedition (fortunately, it didn't - though IIRC a team from the next expedition's crew got partway into training for this just in case).

The iROSA structural mod kit installs (i.e., the prep work that has to be done before installing each set of arrays) seem to fall into the "skills-based" category, and thus have been rotated amongst all available crew in the usual manner. However, the subsequent installations of the iROSA arrays themselves seem to be more complex and evidently require specific training.

I would expect EVA-84 in January to be conducted by some combination of Mann and Wakata since it is another iROSA mod kit install and therefore "skills-based", allowing NASA to give the remaining expedition members a chance to participate. The subsequent EVAs to install the two additional iROSA arrays going up on SpX-27 in January haven't had their dates announced yet, but I would expect them to be conducted either by the same Cassada+Rubio team (if during Expedition 68 before Crew-5 leaves in February), or by two particular members of the next expedition if after the Crew-5/6 handover.

Offline cohberg

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #5 on: 11/26/2022 11:30 pm »
The second type of EVA (there's a formal term for it but it escapes me at the moment) involves unusually complex or specialized tasks that the astronauts must specifically train for in the NBL before flying.

I believe the other is a "task-based" EVA.
Sourced from the "Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Hardware & Operations Overview" presentation which is attached.

It's surprising to see Cassada and Rubio on the first 3 iRosa EVAs.
Won't Mann and Wakata do EVA?

I think another "simple" explanation is that Rubio and Cassada represent the 2 tallest / longest "reach" USOS astronauts. I forget where it was mentioned but total armspan / "reach" is important for some specific spacewalks and is especially highlighted with the iROSA install spacewalks.

Astronauts are in the APFR and need to the span the gap between the station arm and the iROSA when moving it between worksites. Per the NASA's EVA Manual (Volume I, Section 14), just 10 inches represents 90% of useable work "reach". Having that little bit of reach advantage can likely make a big difference in a spacewalk like this.







Offline Targeteer

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #6 on: 11/26/2022 11:49 pm »
The US crew had a full duty day, odd for Saturday, and did extensive EVA servicing on EMUs 3004 and 3013, no surprise since there were no suit issues on the last EVA...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Ben E

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Re: ISS US EVA 82 - 3A IROSA Install
« Reply #7 on: 11/27/2022 05:44 am »
I do recall a comment Rob Navias made to me back in June 2021 about why Kimbrough/Pesquet did all three iROSA EVAs. He told me that, in part, it was due to the close proximity of the EVAs, which made it simpler to have them do all three, rather than resize the EMUs for another crew member.

Maybe that plays into the decision, too.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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https://twitter.com/kathylueders/status/1598407454185836545

Quote
.@NASA_Astronauts aboard @Space_Station will conduct a pair of spacewalks in December. NASA will provide live coverage of the first spacewalk beginning at 6 a.m. EST on Dec. 3. The spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 7:25 a.m. and last about seven hours. go.nasa.gov/3VpT7bS

https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-to-provide-live-coverage-of-us-spacewalks-outside-space-station

Quote
Dec 1, 2022
MEDIA ADVISORY M22-179

NASA to Provide Live Coverage of US Spacewalks Outside Space Station

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station will conduct a pair of U.S. spacewalks in December to install rollout solar arrays to increase electrical power in support of station operations and scientific research.

NASA will provide live coverage of the first spacewalk beginning at 6 a.m. EST on Saturday, Dec. 3 on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website. The spacewalk is scheduled to begin at 7:25 a.m. and last about seven hours.

NASA astronauts Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio will exit the station’s Quest airlock to install an International Space Station Roll-Out Solar Array (iROSA) to augment power generation for the 3A power channel on the station’s starboard truss structure.

In addition to installing an iROSA, the spacewalkers will disconnect a cable to ensure the 1B channel can be reactivated. Flight controllers recently changed electrical power routing to remove one of the eight International Space Station power channels from use to ensure batteries were being charged at expected levels. Station systems normally powered by the 1B channel are currently using electricity from the 1A power channel with no impact to station operations.

This spacewalking task will restore redundancy for affected station systems following unexpected tripping observed on the 1B channel Nov. 26. By isolating a section of the impacted array, which was one of several damaged strings, the goal is to restore 75% of the array’s functionality.

Cassada and Rubio are scheduled to conduct the next U.S. spacewalk Dec.19, this time to install an iROSA on the 4A power channel on the port truss. The exact times of the spacewalk and NASA coverage will be determined later.

For the Dec. 3 spacewalk Cassada will serve as extravehicular crew member 1 (EV 1) and will wear a suit with red stripes. Rubio will serve as extravehicular crew member 2 (EV 2) and will wear the unmarked suit. For the Dec. 19 spacewalk, Rubio will serve as extravehicular crew number 1 (EV 1) and will wear a suit with red stripes. Cassada will serve as extravehicular crew member 2 and will wear the unmarked suit. The spacewalks will be the second and third spacewalks in both Cassada and Rubio’s careers.

The iROSAs arrived at the space station on Nov. 27, following a launch aboard the agency’s 26th SpaceX Dragon commercial resupply mission on Nov. 26.

These will be the third and fourth iROSAs installed on space station out of a total six planned for installation. Overall, the iROSAs will increase power generation capability by up to 30%, increasing the station’s total available power from 160 kilowatts to up to 215 kilowatts.

Get breaking news, images and features from the space station on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Learn more about the International Space Station and its crew at:

https://www.nasa.gov/station

-end-

Photo caption:

Quote
NASA astronaut and Expedition 68 Flight Engineer Frank Rubio is pictured during a spacewalk tethered to the International Space Station's starboard truss structure.
Credits: NASA
« Last Edit: 12/01/2022 07:27 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Offline Targeteer

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O2 pre-breathe started at 0715Z
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline Rondaz

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Spacewalk with NASA Astronauts Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio


Offline Rondaz

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Spacewalkers Exiting Station Soon Live on NASA TV

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2022

NASA Television coverage of today’s spacewalk with NASA astronauts Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio is now underway and is also available on the NASA app, the space station blog and the agency’s website.

The crew members of Expedition 68 are preparing to exit the International Space Station‘s Quest airlock for a spacewalk expected to begin about 7:25 a.m. EST and last approximately seven hours.

NASA astronauts Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio will exit the station’s Quest airlock to install an International Space Station Roll-Out Solar Array (iROSA) to augment power generation for the 3A power channel on the station’s starboard truss structure.

In addition to installing an iROSA, the spacewalkers will disconnect a cable to allow the 1B power channel to be reactivated after it was shut down due to a power trip in its electrical system. The disconnection of the cable will isolate the affected portion of the array and restore the channel to 75% of its normal operating capacity.

Cassada will serve as extravehicular crew member 1 (EV 1) and will wear a suit with red stripes. Rubio will serve as extravehicular crew member 2 (EV 2) and will wear the unmarked suit. The spacewalk will be the second for both Cassada and Rubio.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2022/12/03/spacewalkers-exiting-station-soon-live-on-nasa-tv/

Offline Rondaz

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Two @NASA_Astronauts are preparing to begin a spacewalk at 6:25am ET today live on @NASA TV to install a roll-out solar array on the station.

https://twitter.com/Space_Station/status/1598996859191971840

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Previous tweet was deleted as it had the wrong time:

https://twitter.com/space_station/status/1599004001370263553

Quote
Two @NASA_Astronauts are preparing to begin a spacewalk at 7:25am ET today live on @NASA TV to install a roll-out solar array on the station.
« Last Edit: 12/03/2022 10:36 am by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline Joachim

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Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio set their spacesuits to battery power at 7:16am ET (12:16 UTC) today beginning a spacewalk to install a roll-out solar array on the station.

Offline Joachim

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Josh Cassada  is releasing the bolts on the roll-out solar array to remove it from its attachment point before installing it on the station.
« Last Edit: 12/03/2022 01:12 pm by Joachim »

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https://twitter.com/space_station/status/1599039547207081985

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.@NASA spacewalker Josh Cassada is releasing the bolts on the roll-out solar array to remove it from its attachment point before installing it on the station. nasa.gov/live

Offline Joachim

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https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2022/12/03/spacewalkers-exit-station-to-install-roll-out-solar-array/

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Spacewalkers Exit Station to Install Roll-Out Solar Array

Expedition 68 Flight Engineers Josh Cassada and Frank Rubio of NASA began a spacewalk at 7:16 a.m. EST to install an International Space Station Roll-Out Solar Array (iROSA) to augment power generation for the 3A power channel on the station’s starboard truss structure.

In addition to installing an iROSA, the spacewalkers will disconnect a cable to allow the 1B power channel to be reactivated after it was shut down due to a power trip in its electrical system. The disconnection of the cable will isolate the affected portion of the array and restore the channel to 75% of its normal operating capacity.

Cassada, designated extravehicular crew member 1 (EV1), is wearing a suit with red stripes. Rubio, designated extravehicular crewmember 2 (EV 2), is in an unmarked suit. Coverage of the spacewalk continues on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website.

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Astronaut Josh Cassada is pictured during a spacewalk on Nov. 15, 2022, to ready the space station for future rollout solar array installation work.

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