Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon Heavy : Astrobotic Griffin : KSC LC-39A : NET autumn 2025  (Read 19250 times)

Offline bolun

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #20 on: 09/25/2022 05:55 pm »
ESA lunar landing camera to fly to the Moon

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ESA has many ambitions for exploring our Moon, and we are setting the groundwork for a lander that can rely on cameras and lidar to analyse lunar terrain and choose the best landing spot – autonomously. The camera is ready, but nothing beats a real-world test: ESA has chosen Lunar Logistics Services and Astrobotic from a competitive tender to fly the innovative camera, called LandCam-X, to the Moon in 2024 on Astrobotic’s Griffin Mission One.

Image credit: ESA
« Last Edit: 09/25/2022 05:57 pm by bolun »

Offline bolun

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #21 on: 10/02/2022 08:37 pm »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #22 on: 05/02/2023 03:19 pm »
https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1653413197427113984

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Astrobotic's 2nd lunar lander mission, Griffin Mission One, is on track to launch in late 2024. Here, you can see Griffin's 12x12 ft. deck. It was machined out of a single piece of aluminum to less than 3% of its original mass!

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #23 on: 05/15/2023 02:59 pm »
https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1658124191646842882

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Please don't disturb the bird's new wings. It can't fly yet...... 🐦our #Griffin lunar lander is coming along nicely in the Clean Room! Here, its "wings" are being integrated to its central cone.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #24 on: 08/18/2023 05:10 pm »
https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1692573940667892112

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Our Griffin flight unit is well under way! This lunar lander is carrying precious cargo, @NASA's VIPER Moon rover, to the lunar surface in late 2024. 🌔

Offline gtae07

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #25 on: 11/09/2023 03:48 pm »
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45886.msg2538337#msg2538337
Seems like they could have recovered the center core for this mission then, if they hadn't decided to make them all expendable.

According to SpaceX's Jon Edwards they'll have center core recovery on the Astrobotic flight flying next year so it's not off the table.

Saw this in the thread for the next X-37 launch.  Do we have a reference on this?

Online Alexphysics

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #26 on: 11/09/2023 04:40 pm »
https://twitter.com/edwards345/status/1682504951275356161

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Next few Heavy missions all require we expend the center core, but should have at least one mission next year where we recover it (Astrobotic Griffin).

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #27 on: 12/30/2023 10:28 pm »
Mission Manager Update: VIPER Flight Rover Half-Built!

Rachel Hoover
DEC 29, 2023

The VIPER team is hard at work building the flight vehicle that will be going to the surface of the Moon this time next year! In fact, we’re about halfway through the build, and you can interactively watch the process and hear from experts on the team, in various livestreams throughout the process.

All the science instrument teams have delivered their payloads to the VIPER Systems Integration & Test team, which will install them into the actual flight rover; in fact, all but one is already installed! This was a huge milestone over the past summer, and a frequent sticking point for many flight projects. I’m happy to have all the birds in the nest!

We also have taken delivery of most of the key pieces of hardware we acquired from our various external vendors. This is a very important milestone as well, since a large number of vendors of critical components have been quite behind schedule in their deliveries to the project, due to pandemic-era supply chain issues that continue to reverberate throughout the industry in some unexpected ways. It is good to have VIPER past this point in development, where we can now focus on bringing everything together into a functioning rover.

So now that we are building the flight article, we are able to see precisely how well our design plans are working in reality. There have been some reveals in the first half of the rover build, which we’ve had to navigate, including connector issues from vendors, where we’ve discovered and corrected some design and Foreign Object Debris issues, which prevented connectors from reliably working. We’ve also found some unexpected performance characteristics revealed by some vendor hardware, which we have had to then fold into our plans for how we operate VIPER…These issues and solutions are all part of the challenging process of building a flight article, and ensuring it can survive the very harsh environment of launch, landing, and operations on the lunar surface.

Once the team completes the flight rover assembly, the next step will be to test that rover in the kinds of environments it will see on the mission. This activity will be our primary focus in 2024, and our final step prior to delivering VIPER for launch integration.

Go VIPER!

– Dan Andrews, VIPER Project Manager

Online yg1968

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Offline GewoonLukas_

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #29 on: 03/05/2024 02:35 pm »
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NASA's Joel Kearns says at the Planetary Science Advisory Cmte meeting this morning that, unsurprisingly, it is extremely unlikely VIPER will launch on Astrobotic's Griffin lander this year (was set for November.) Awaiting results of Peregrine failure review board for next steps.

https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1765033676478312791
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Offline deltaV

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: late 2024
« Reply #30 on: 03/05/2024 03:15 pm »
There's some discussion of ways to reduce the risk of VIPER's lander in the other VIPER thread in the crewed Moon section of the forum starting at https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=51174.msg2571292#msg2571292.

Offline StraumliBlight

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: NET 2024
« Reply #31 on: 04/09/2024 02:29 pm »
Spacefarer & CubeRover Joint Lunar Rover Demonstration On Griffin-1

https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1777460177676992574

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Pittsburgh – April 8, 2024 – Mission Control and Astrobotic are partnering for a joint rover demonstration mission on the Moon. Astrobotic’s CubeRover™ integrated with Mission Control’s Spacefarer™ operations platform will travel to the lunar south pole on Astrobotic’s first upcoming Griffin lander mission.

Astrobotic’s CubeRover is a scalable rover designed to traverse multiple kilometers across planetary bodies and accommodate a vast variety of payloads. Mission Control’s Spacefarer™ software platform will integrate with the shoebox-sized CubeRover to demonstrate commanding and monitoring of a lunar rover in real time. 

“We are delighted to form this partnership with Astrobotic who are among the forerunners driving the creation of a new lunar economy” said Dr. Samara Pillay, Vice-President of AI & Space Products at Mission Control. “Their trust in licensing our Spacefarer™ operations platform for a three-year period is an important validation of our value proposition to customers and we look forward to supporting them on many missions to come with this mission-critical technology.”

This demonstration mission is being supported by a financial contribution from the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) through their Lunar Exploration Accelerator Program (LEAP). This contribution is a critical enabler for Canadian companies to form partnerships with American counterparts leading the charge back to the Moon.

“CubeRover’s development has been backed by $20+ million in NASA awards and decades of experience. Because it has been engineered alongside Astrobotic’s lunar landers, CubeRover can achieve long-range communications and traverse multiple kilometers across the Moon’s surface. We’re pleased to have Spacefarer™ aboard this first mission to provide them with as much operations data as possible,” says Mike Provenzano, Astrobotic’s Vice President, Advanced Development Programs.

Spacefarer™ was developed with the support of the CSA’s Space Technology Development program. Designed to command and control a wide variety of robotics and advanced payloads, Spacefarer™ provides an intuitive and reliable web-based operations platform, user-friendly and flexible interfaces, and robust cloud architecture, to operate robots and payloads anywhere, anytime.

“Having been the first Canadian owned company to participate in a real lunar rover mission, we’re thrilled to remain in our leadership position when it comes to lunar rover missions,” said Ewan Reid, Founder & CEO of Mission Control. “For decades Canada has been an international leader in space robotics and maintaining that position will require a continued expansion of the Canadian industrial base to support what is expected to be a rapidly growing lunar economy.”

“This international partnership exemplifies the benefits of a commercial approach to lunar exploration and a validation of the emerging cis-lunar economy,” said Provenzano. “NASA’s Commercial Lunar Payload Services initiative and LEAP are putting North American firms at the forefront of humanity’s return to the Moon.”

Astrobotic is scheduled to launch its Griffin lunar lander no earlier than the fourth quarter of 2024 making this one of the first in a wave of commercial missions to the Moon.

Launch date updated to NET Q4 2024.

Offline GewoonLukas_

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Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy: Astrobotic Griffin/VIPER: NET 2024
« Reply #32 on: 05/23/2024 07:51 pm »
Now NET 2025:

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In an update on CLPS science, NASA’s Joel Kearns noted that the launch of the @astrobotic Griffin lander is moving out of 2024 and to sometime in 2025, depending on their development schedule.

It will still host NASA’s VIPER as its primary payload.

https://twitter.com/w_robinsonsmith/status/1793699585745191066
Lukas C. H. • Hobbyist Mission Patch Artist 🎨 • May the force be with you my friend, Ad Astra Per Aspera ✨️

Offline GewoonLukas_

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Next available science window is Fall 2025:

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GAO: Assessments of Major Projects
June 2024

[...]

Cost and Schedule Status
[...]
In January 2024, the first mission using the Astrobotic Peregrine lander failed due to propulsion system issues after launch. Astrobotic planned to use information from the Peregrine lander to help inform development of the Griffin lander. The project is continuing to assess the effect of this issue on its schedule, including being directed by NASA to explore the next available science window that would meet VIPER mission requirements for the lighting conditions on the moon, which would be in fall 2025.
[...]
Lukas C. H. • Hobbyist Mission Patch Artist 🎨 • May the force be with you my friend, Ad Astra Per Aspera ✨️

Offline deltaV

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From the other VIPER thread:

https://www.nasa.gov/news-release/nasa-ends-viper-project-continues-moon-exploration/

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NASA Ends VIPER Project, Continues Moon Exploration

Following a comprehensive internal review, NASA announced Wednesday its intent to discontinue development of its VIPER (Volatiles Investigating Polar Exploration Rover) project...

Astrobotic will continue its Griffin Mission One within its contract with NASA, working toward a launch scheduled for no earlier than fall 2025. The landing without VIPER will provide a flight demonstration of the Griffin lander and its engines...

So it sounds like the launch that this thread is about will still happen but it will be a test flight for Griffin without a useful payload.

IMO going forward let's put all VIPER discussion in the other thread and all post-VIPER Griffin discussion in this thread.

Offline StraumliBlight

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NASA cancels VIPER lunar rover

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NASA said Griffin was now expected to be ready for the mission no earlier than September 2025.

With VIPER canceled, NASA will retain the task order for Griffin. The mission will instead become a technology demonstrator, carrying a mass simulator in place of the rover to test Griffin’s ability to land large payloads.

Kearns said NASA considered flying science payloads instead, but since the lander was designed for carrying a rover, it lacked payload accommodations and capabilities like power and communications those payload would need.

“We believe that if we were to ask Astrobotic to make changes like that, it would further delay their schedule,” he said of potential modifications to accommodate payloads. “It would lead to more cost for the government. It would lead to a delay of the demonstration of a successful south pole landing by the large Griffin lander, which we are very interested in seeing.”

Astrobotic will also be free to fly their own commercial payloads. John Thornton, chief executive of Astrobotic, said in an interview that the company is considering flying a test of its LunaGrid power generation service on Griffin. “We do want to fly quickly but we also want to make a mission that is more impactful than just the lander itself.”

A VIPER-less Griffin would still land at the south polar region of the moon, he said, although not necessarily at the same site NASA selected for VIPER. It will depend on any new payloads it signs up for the lander, with the option of going to a safer landing site to reduce the risk for the mission.

Both Kearns and Thornton said that the agency informed the company of the decision very recently, but were not more specific. One industry source said NASA informed Astrobotic of the decision just a day before it was publicly announced.

https://twitter.com/astrobotic/status/1813666788103577834
« Last Edit: Today at 11:16 am by StraumliBlight »

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