Author Topic: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission  (Read 3251 times)

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NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« on: 11/16/2006 06:19 PM »
"...being able to have astronauts go out there and sort of poke one with a stick would be scientifically valuable as well as demonstrate human capabilities."

http://www.space.com/news/061116_asteroid_nasa.html







Offline hektor

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #1 on: 11/16/2006 07:14 PM »
"Another study is delving into use of Constellation components to support an automated Mars sample return mission. That study is led by NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "
THAT is interesting... most obvious choice is Ares V I think.

Offline meiza

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #2 on: 11/16/2006 09:18 PM »
What are the conceptual delta v needs needed for an asteroid mission? Mission duration 60 to 90 days. Interesting.

Offline spacedreams

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #3 on: 11/16/2006 10:53 PM »

Quote
meiza - 16/11/2006  2:01 PM  What are the conceptual delta v needs needed for an asteroid mission? Mission duration 60 to 90 days. Interesting.

 

It would depend on what kind of orbit the asteroid is in and the available rendevous point.  It is a difficult general question to answer . Does anybody know if they have a particular asteroid in mind or if they just eyeballed hypothetically somewhere between the moon and Mars? It is probably very preliminary
 


Offline meiza

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #4 on: 11/16/2006 11:18 PM »
Well, what are the five easiest asteroids in say, 2015-2030 timeframe?

Offline Jim

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #5 on: 11/17/2006 12:01 AM »
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meiza - 16/11/2006  7:01 PM

Well, what are the five easiest asteroids in say, 2015-2030 timeframe?

Later timeframe, after the lunar missions.  2025 or later

Offline darkenfast

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #6 on: 11/17/2006 03:40 PM »
Back before the ESAS report first came out, I asked this question over on space.com, where they have an astronomy section.   I was pointed towards some information regarding NEO's, and found that they had some really strange orbits that I had never heard of.  Some of the more knowledgable types on that forum seemed to think that getting to any of them might be a lot harder than you might think.   This was a while ago, but Cruithne (sp?), was mentioned as a possibility.  My idea at the time was to use a modified LSAM as a small hab and propulsion stage.  It would not have any landing gear; the astronauts would use something like the old Manned Manuevering Units to touch down.

Offline simonbp

Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #7 on: 11/19/2006 01:54 PM »
The purpose of this mission would not be to "land" per se on the asteroid, but to fly a CEV and telerobotics package to obit around it. The package would probably be a pallet with observational instruments (visual, IR camera; IR, neutron, X-ray, and gamma spectrometer), as well as one or two "landers" that could be teleoperated by the crew, reducing significantly the time it takes to do surface investigation. The pallet would probably use the LSAM mounting points and an LDIS docking adaptor, but otherwise could use a simple open structure...

Would a Lunar/L2 flyby be useful in getting to the asteroid?

Simon ;)

Offline hektor

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Re: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #8 on: 11/20/2006 12:16 PM »
At least some "not quite like Apollo" part in the program !

Maybe a joint mission with JAXA to Itokawa could be undertaken ? That would herald international cooperation in exploration. I knew a pretty German intern at JSC not so long ago who was making a catalog of such NEO-easy-to-reach-in-a-few-months ones.

I remember that some such "asteroids" were suspected to be spent Saturn V stages.

For 3753 Cruithne, please read Stephen Baxter's "Manifold: Time" ;)

I remain very interested by the study about use of Constellation elements for Mars Sample Return. I hope we find tidbits about this one soon.

Offline Chris Bergin

RE: NASA Studies Manned Asteroid Mission
« Reply #9 on: 11/22/2006 02:57 PM »
1999 NASA study on this....

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