Author Topic: SpaceX F9 / Dragon 2 : CRS2 SpX-22 June/July 2021 (Splashdown 10 July 0329 UTC)  (Read 336855 times)

Offline StraumliBlight

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« Last Edit: 05/25/2021 06:51 pm by StraumliBlight »

Offline SMS

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From NASA:

COMMENT |       EVENT        |       TIG        | ORB |   DV    |   HA    |   HP    |
COMMENT |                    |       GMT        |     |   M/S   |   KM    |   KM    |
COMMENT |                    |      (MET)       |     |  (F/S)  |  (NM)   |  (NM)   |
COMMENT =============================================================================
COMMENT  SpX-22 Launch         154:17:29:29.000             0.0     427.6     411.6
COMMENT                       (153/17:29:29.000)           (0.0)   (230.9)   (222.2)
COMMENT
COMMENT  SpX-22 Docking        156:09:00:00.000             0.0     427.6     411.5
COMMENT                       (155/09:00:00.000)           (0.0)   (230.9)   (222.2)
COMMENT
COMMENT =============================================================================

SpX-22 Launch June 3, 2021 at 17:29:29 UTC / 1:29:29 p.m. EDT

SpX-22 Docking June 5, 2021 at 09:00:00 UTC / 5:00:00 a.m. EDT

Offline Conexion Espacial

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A 3U SOAR cubesat is also on board.

https://www.manchester.ac.uk/discover/news/manchester-scientists-to-launch-low-orbiting-satellite-on-spacex-mission/

Add on page 5 this cubesat in the list of cubesats that will be launched in the mission and also the photo of the cubesat
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Offline RamSatMentor

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RamSat and SOAR are neighbors in a Nanoracks deployer.

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Offline Jansen

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https://www.issnationallab.org/iss360/spacex-crs-22-private-sector-partner-investigations/

Quote
SpaceX CRS-22 to Launch Numerous Investigations Supported by Private-Sector Partners

SpaceX plans to launch its 22nd Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) mission to the International Space Station (ISS) no earlier than June 3 at 1:29 p.m. EDT. This launch, contracted through NASA, will resupply the orbiting laboratory with critical research and supplies for the Expedition 65 crew that is presently in orbit. On this mission, the ISS U.S. National Laboratory is sponsoring more than a dozen payloads from diverse disciplines—all aiming to bring value to our nation and drive a robust and sustainable market in low Earth orbit.

Many of the investigations on this mission are being performed or funded by highly recognizable private-sector organizations. The Center for the Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) began management of the ISS National Lab in 2011, and since that time, more than 50% of the ISS National Lab research and development (R&D) portfolio represents investigations from commercial entities. Through private-sector utilization of the space station, companies can conduct R&D in ways not possible on Earth to develop new consumer products, enhance existing products, and better understand processes that further business models both on the ground and in low Earth orbit. Below highlights some of the ISS National Lab-sponsored investigations launching on SpaceX CRS-22 that are supported by private-sector partners.

Global consumer care company Colgate-Palmolive will launch the first private-sector oral health care investigation to the ISS. The project will use a microfluidic device developed by faculty in the College of Engineering at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in collaboration with oral microbiologists from Colgate-Palmolive and a payload specialist team from Teledyne Brown Engineering. The research team aims to identify the molecular characteristics of a healthy and diseased oral microbiome (a microbial community composed of different bacterial species) by cultivating oral bacterial biofilms growing on an enamel-type surface. The research team will study unique plaque pathologies in relation to oral health status, examine gravity’s effects on biofilm formation and oral dysbiosis (an imbalance in the oral microbial community), and compare responses to common oral care agents in an effort to create more effective products for consumers on Earth.

To minimize the water consumption used for cotton production, Target Corporation has funded a project from the University of Wisconsin to examine the response of cotton plants to the stress of microgravity and evaluate effects on growth and root behavior. This investigation seeks to better understand the genetics involved in root system development, which could lead to the production of cotton plants that use water more efficiently on Earth.

Pharmaceutical giant Eli Lilly and Company has a history of sending innovative research and development to the ISS. On this mission, the company will launch an investigation to examine the effects of gravity on the physical state and properties of freeze-dried pharmaceutical products. Results could help Lilly improve the chemical and physical stability of pharmaceutical products for patients on Earth.

Offline Jansen

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Colgate-Palmolive is sending an experiment to study oral biofilms. At 1:15, the PI indicates this will be a 45 day mission.


Offline Jansen

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Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.

Each SAW is 2400 pounds. The iROSAs will shadow 2/3s of the SAWs, but are 20% lighter.

So ~1280 pounds each, or around 2560 pounds (1161.2kg) for both iROSAs.

NASA should be releasing more concrete figures this week.

During the media briefing today, the total iROSA payload was stated to weigh 3000 pounds, at around the 22 minute mark.

Offline Conexion Espacial

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Arrival at the space station is scheduled for Saturday, June 5; Dragon will dock autonomously to the station's Harmony module, with Expedition 65 flight engineers Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur with NASA monitoring operations.
I publish information in Spanish about space and rockets.
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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State of play on the Space Coast for the immediate future:
Scheduled:
Date - Satellite(s) - Rocket - Launch Site - Time (UTC)

2021
June 3 early June - Dragon v2 SpX-22 (CRS-22) - Falcon 9-120 (1067.1 S) - Kennedy LC-39A - 17:29:17 ~17:00 17:29:29 17:29:14 17:29:15
(ISS flights: launch 22-26 minutes earlier/day)

June 6 NET Q2 1 early - SiriusXM SXM-8 - Falcon 9-121 (1061.3 S) - Canaveral SLC-40 - 04:25-06:26 04:25 ~04:00

June 17 July  - GPS III SV05 - Falcon 9-122 (B1062.2 S) - Canaveral SLC-40 - 22:00-01:00 June 18
(GPS: launch about 4 minutes earlier/day)

June 23 late - STP-3: STPSat-6, ROOSTER-1 (LDPE-1), small satellites (x6) - Atlas V 551 (AV-093) - Canaveral SLC-41

Last week of June late June-July late June - Transporter-2: Capella 5, D2/AtlaCom-1, GNOMES 2, ION SCV-003 [Ghalib, NAPA 2/RTAF-SAT 2, Neptuno, QMR-KWT, Spartan, W-Cube, hosted payloads: ADEO, LaserCube, Nebula, Worldfloods], LEMUR-2 (x1), LINCS A, LINCS B, Mandrake 2A, Mandrake 2B, Minas (x1), SAI-2, Satellogic sat (x4), Sherpa-FX2 [Astrocast (x5), Hawk (x3), LEMUR-2 (x3), Lynk-06, PAINANI-II, SpaceBEE (x12), hosted payload: TagSat-2], Sherpa-LTE1 [ARTHUR-1, Faraday Phoenix, KSM-2 (Kleos Polar Vigilance Mission) (x4), LEMUR-2 (x1), Orbit Fab Tenzing, Shasta, Tiger-2], Starlink (x?) [v1.0], TUBIN, Vigoride-1 [Alba Cluster 3 (DelfiPQ, Grizu-263a, EASAT-2, Hades, TRSI-2, Sattla-2, Unicorn 1, Unicorn 2A, Unicorn 2D), AuroraSat-1, LABSAT, NUTSAT, STEAMSAT, SWIFTVISION, VZLUSAT-2], Vigoride-2 [Broncosat-1, Challenger, FEES-2, Gossamer, Guardian-Alpha, IRIS-A, Kepler-16, Kepler-17, Oresat0, SanoSat-1, STORK-1, STORK-2, STORK-3, Steamsat-2, TROPICS Pathfinder, TRSI-3], XR-2, YAM-2, YAM-3 - Falcon 9-123 (L) - Canaveral SLC-40 Vandenberg SLC-4E
(Sun-synchronous orbit satellites: launch at approximately the same time of day year-round)

NET July NET June - Starlink flight 30 (x60) [v1.0 L29] - Falcon 9 (S) - Kennedy LC-39A / Canaveral SLC-40
(Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

NET July - Starlink flight 31? (x60) [v1.0 L30?] - Falcon 9 (S) - Kennedy LC-39A / Canaveral SLC-40
(Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

NET July - Starlink flight 32? (x60) [v1.0 L31?] - Falcon 9 (S) - Kennedy LC-39A / Canaveral SLC-40
(Starlink: launch 20-22 minutes earlier/day)

Changes on March 16th
Changes on March 31st
Changes on April 2nd
Changes on April 4th
Changes on April 7th
Changes on April 15th
Changes on April 16th
Changes on April 19th
Changes on May 4th
Changes on May 5th
Changes on May 11th
Changes on May 12th
Changes on May 15th
Changes on May 17th
Changes on May 20th
Changes on May 21st
Changes on May 22nd
Changes on May 25th
Changes on May 26th
Changes on May 27th
Changes on May 28th
Changes on May 29th
Changes on June 1st
Changes on June 2nd
Changes on June 3rd
zubenelgenubi
« Last Edit: 06/08/2021 09:37 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Jansen

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A lot of NASA TV coverage over the next month to CRS-22 and iROSA installation
Quote
June 2, Wednesday
11 a.m. – “What’s On Board?” briefing for NASA’s SpaceX CRS-22 commercial cargo launch to the International Space Station (All Channels)
1:30 p.m. – Pre-launch briefing for NASA’s SpaceX CRS-22 commercial cargo launch to the International Space Station (All Channels)

June 3, Thursday
12:30 p.m. – Coverage of the launch of NASA’s SpaceX CRS-22 commercial cargo mission to the International Space Station (Public Channel)
1 p.m. – Coverage of the launch of NASA’s SpaceX CRS-22 commercial cargo mission to the International Space Station; launch scheduled at 1:29 p.m. EDT (Media Channel)
3 p.m. – NASA Science Live: Year of Science (All Channels)

June 5, Saturday
3:30 a.m. – Coverage of the rendezvous and docking of the SpaceX CRS-22 cargo craft to the International Space Station; docking scheduled at 5 a.m. EDT (All Channels)

June 14, Monday
2 p.m. – International Space Station Expedition 65 U.S. spacewalk # 74 and 75 preview briefing (All Channels)

June 16, Wednesday
6:30 a.m. – Coverage of International Space Station Expedition 65 U.S. spacewalk # 74 to install the first IROSA solar array on the P6 Truss for the 2B Channel Power System; spacewalk scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. EDT and will last 6 ½ hours with Pesquet and Kimbrough (All Channels)

June 20, Sunday
6:30 a.m. – Coverage of International Space Station Expedition 65 U.S. spacewalk # 75 to install the second IROSA solar array on the P6 Truss for the 4B Channel Power System; spacewalk scheduled to begin at 8 a.m. EDT and will last 6 ½ hours with Pesquet and Kimbrough (All Channels)

Offline Targeteer

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May 26, 2021
MEDIA ADVISORY M21-067
NASA Sets Coverage, Invites Public to Virtually Join Next Cargo Launch


NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting 1:29 p.m. EDT, Thursday, June 3, to launch its 22nd commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station. Liftoff will be from Launch Complex 39A at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft will deliver new solar arrays to power future work aboard the orbiting laboratory, along with new science investigations, supplies, and equipment for the international crew. Live coverage will air on NASA Television,  the NASA app and the agency’s website, with prelaunch events starting Wednesday, June 2.

Dragon’s pressurized capsule will carry a variety of research, including an experiment that could help develop better pharmaceuticals and therapies for treating kidney disease on Earth, a study of cotton root systems that could identify varieties of plants that require less water and pesticides. The research also will include two model organism investigations: One will study bobtail squid to examine the effects of spaceflight on interactions between beneficial microbes and their animal hosts. The other will examine tardigrades’ adaptation to conditions in low-Earth orbit, which could advance understanding of the stress factors affecting humans in space.

The mission will include technology demonstrations, including a portable ultrasound device. Additionally, astronauts will test the effectiveness of remotely operating robotic arms and space vehicles using virtual reality and haptics interfaces.

Dragon’s unpressurized trunk section will deliver the first two of six new roll-out solar arrays based on a design tested on the space station in 2017. A robotic arm will extract them and astronauts will install them during a series of spacewalks this summer.

About 12 minutes after launch, Dragon will separate from the Falcon 9 rocket’s second stage and begin a carefully choreographed series of thruster firings to reach the space station. Arrival to the space station is planned for Saturday, June 5. Dragon will autonomously dock to the space-facing port on the station’s Harmony module, with Expedition 65 Flight Engineers Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur of NASA monitoring operations.

The spacecraft is expected to spend more than a month attached to the space station before it splashes down in the Atlantic Ocean, returning with research and return cargo.

Full coverage of this mission is as follows (all times Eastern):

Wednesday, June 2

11 a.m. – Want an in-depth look at the science aboard Dragon? Watch on NASA TV or join us on Kennedy Space Center’s Facebook and YouTube pages as we chat with some of the principal investigators. If you have questions for them, use #AskNASA on Twitter. They may answer in real-time during the segment.

11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. – Previously credentialed media will have an opportunity to speak one-on-one with scientists and other subject matter experts at the Kennedy Press Site (compliant with COVID-19 safety protocols).*
 

1:30 p.m. – NASA TV will broadcast a prelaunch news conference from Kennedy with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program, SpaceX, and the U.S. Space Force Space Launch Delta 45. For the dial-in number and passcode, please contact the Kennedy newsroom at [email protected] no later than 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 2. The public can also ask questions by using #AskNASA on Twitter. They may be answered in real-time during the segment.

Thursday, June 3

1 p.m. – NASA TV coverage begins for the targeted 1:29 p.m. launch.

Saturday, June 5

3:30 a.m. – NASA TV coverage begins for Dragon docking to space station.

5 a.m. – Docking

*The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed, but general information about media accreditation is available by emailing [email protected]

NASA TV Launch Coverage

Live coverage of the launch on NASA TV will begin at 1 p.m. Thursday, June 3. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules, and links to streaming video, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Audio of the news conference and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, -1260 or -7135. On launch day, "mission audio" countdown activities without NASA TV launch commentary, will be carried on 321-867-7135.

On launch day, a “clean feed” of the launch without NASA TV commentary will be carried on the NASA TV media channel.

NASA Website Launch Coverage

Launch day coverage of the mission will be available on NASA’s website. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning no earlier than 1 p.m. Thursday, June 3, as the countdown milestones occur. On-demand streaming video and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. For questions about countdown coverage, contact the Kennedy newsroom at 321-867-2468. Follow countdown coverage on the agency’s launch blog at:

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacexcrs22/

Attend This Launch Virtually

Members of the public can register to attend this launch virtually. Attendees will receive mission updates and activities via email. NASA’s virtual guest program for this mission also includes curated launch resources, notifications about related opportunities, as well as a stamp for their NASA virtual guest passport following a successful launch.

Watch and Engage on Social Media

Let people know you're following the mission on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram by using the hashtags #Dragon and #NASASocial. You can also stay connected by following and tagging these accounts:

Twitter: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @NASASocial, @Space_Station, @ISS_Research, @ISS National Lab, @SpaceX

Facebook: NASA, NASAKennedy, ISS, ISS National Lab

Instagram: @NASA, @NASAKennedy, @ISS, @ISSNationalLab, @SpaceX

Learn more about the SpaceX resupply mission at:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Para obtener información sobre cobertura en español en el Centro Espacial Kennedy o si desea solicitar entrevistas en español, comuníquese con Antonia Jaramillo (321) 501-8425.

-end-
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline SMS

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From NASA:

COMMENT |       EVENT        |       TIG        | ORB |   DV    |   HA    |   HP    |
COMMENT |                    |       GMT        |     |   M/S   |   KM    |   KM    |
COMMENT |                    |      (MET)       |     |  (F/S)  |  (NM)   |  (NM)   |
COMMENT =============================================================================
COMMENT  SpX-22 Launch         154:17:29:29.000             0.0     427.6     411.6
COMMENT                       (153/17:29:29.000)           (0.0)   (230.9)   (222.2)
COMMENT
COMMENT  SpX-22 Docking        156:09:00:00.000             0.0     427.6     411.5
COMMENT                       (155/09:00:00.000)           (0.0)   (230.9)   (222.2)
COMMENT
COMMENT =============================================================================

SpX-22 Launch June 3, 2021 at 17:29:29 UTC / 1:29:29 p.m. EDT

SpX-22 Docking June 5, 2021 at 09:00:00 UTC / 5:00:00 a.m. EDT

Small update so far (26.05.2021):

SpX-22 Launch June 3, 2021 at 17:29:14 UTC / 1:29:14 p.m. EDT
---
SMS ;-).

Offline StraumliBlight

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Mission Overview:

* This booster (B1067) will be reused on the Crew-3 mission.
* Total Cargo: 3,328 kg (1,948 kg pressurized, 1,380 kg unpressurized )

https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/spacex_crs-22_mision_overview_0.pdf

Offline Jansen

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Well, what IS the mass of iROSA???????
Can’t find the information anywhere! Very different from the original ISS solar arrays which have public mass figures.

Each SAW is 2400 pounds. The iROSAs will shadow 2/3s of the SAWs, but are 20% lighter.

So ~1280 pounds each, or around 2560 pounds (1161.2kg) for both iROSAs.

NASA should be releasing more concrete figures this week.

During the media briefing today, the total iROSA payload was stated to weigh 3000 pounds, at around the 22 minute mark.

Unpressurized Payloads
(ISS Roll-Out Solar Arrays)
3,042 pounds / 1,380 kilograms

Offline Rondaz

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NASA’s Virtual Guests Share Solar Power Hopes as Resupply Launch Nears
 
Jason Costa Posted on May 28, 2021

NASA and Boeing workers help position the solar arrays onto flight support equipment inside the high bay of the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on April 2, 2021. The 63- by- 20-foot solar arrays will launch to the International Space Station on NASA SpaceX’s 22nd commercial resupply mission on June 3, 2021. Photo credit: NASA/Frank Michaux

With new solar arrays headed to the International Space Station on NASA SpaceX’s 22nd commercial resupply mission, we asked our virtual guest registrants what they wish could be powered by solar energy. We received over 3,400 responses! A whopping 13 percent of our virtual guests supported solar power for “everything” or “anything.” Among the ideas were many suggestions for how solar could be used on the space station – we’re pleased to share that the orbiting laboratory has been using solar power since 2000.

Besides the space station itself, getting around with solar energy was top of mind for guests. Transportation was the most mentioned category, with 25% of responses mentioning cars and nearly 100 people mentioning planes. Ships, trains, bikes, and rockets were also suggested.

Human beings were a surprising response – nearly 40 people volunteered that they, or their brain, would benefit from solar power. Apparently the coffee and espresso just aren’t cutting it. One brave soul suggested that his wife be converted to solar power as she currently “costs a fortune in chocolate!”.

Our younger virtual guests submitted great responses. They suggested solar powered disco balls, robots to help the astronauts, and ice cream makers. One multi-tasking 11-year-old wished for solar video game controllers so she could sit outside and play.

Finally, some of our favorite answers were appeals to humanity’s better nature. What if solar could feed our hopes for a better future? Or power empathy as well as kindness and peace? Would be amazing! As we look forward to the experiments the new solar arrays will power on the space station, and to launch itself, we hope the sun’s powering something great in your day.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacexcrs22/2021/05/28/nasas-virtual-guests-share-solar-power-hopes-as-resupply-launch-nears/

Offline RamSatMentor

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Is anything known about static fire schedule for booster, or if the capsule and trunk are being integrated yet?

Offline SMS

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https://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-22-mission-overview

Quote
SpaceX CRS-22 Mission Overview

SpaceX’s 22nd contracted cargo resupply mission with NASA to the International Space Station will deliver more than 7,300 pounds of science, research, crew supplies, and vehicle hardware, including new solar arrays, to the orbital laboratory and its crew. This is the second mission under SpaceX’s Commercial Resupply Services-2 contract with NASA. Launch is targeted for Thursday, June 3, at 1:29 p.m. EDT. Launch activities will air live on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website.

Jump To: Research Highlights | Cargo Highlights | Watch & Engage | Arrival & Departure | SpaceX CRS-22 Mision Overview (Printable Version PDF)

Research Highlights

Hundreds of experiments are being conducted on the International Space Station in the areas of biology and biotechnology, physical sciences, and Earth and space science. This research helps us better understand how to prepare for future long-duration missions to the Moon and Mars, supports a growing space economy, and leads to developments that improve life on Earth. The SpaceX cargo spacecraft will deliver dozens of investigations to the International Space Station, including:

    Research that could help develop cotton varieties that require less water and pesticides
    An experiment looking at tardigrade survival in space, which could advance understanding of the stress factors affecting humans in microgravity
    A portable ultrasound device
    A new way of providing tactile and visual feedback to astronauts during robotic operations
    A look at interactions between beneficial microbes and their animal hosts

These and other cutting-edge investigations join the hundreds of ongoing experiments aboard the orbiting laboratory. To learn more, check out our research highlights story.



Cargo Highlights

SpaceX’s Falcon 9 rocket will send the company’s Dragon spacecraft, filled with more than 7,300 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware to the space station to support expeditions 65 and 66.



Hardware

Launch

    ISS Roll-Out Solar Arrays (IROSA) – Solar arrays launching for installation during the summer 2021 spacewalks to upgrade power capabilities on-orbit
    Catalytic Reactor - Legacy unit launching to provide critical sparing support for the water production capability for the environmental control and life support system (ECLSS)
    Commercial Crew Vehicle Emergency Breathing Air Assembly (CEBAA) Regulator Manifold Assembly (RMA) -  Completing the first setup for emergency air supply capability, this integrated system supports as many as five crew members for up to one hour during an ISS emergency ammonia leak
    Zarya control module Kurs electronics unit - Critical hardware for cosmonaut remote-control docking of Russian spacecraft is launching to support planned maintenance activity during 2021
    Portable Water Dispense (PWD) Filter - Major filter assembly used to remove iodine from water consumed by the crew during nominal operations
    Commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) Air Tanks - Critical disposable air tanks to support gas resupply for routine cabin repress activities on-orbit
    Iceberg - Critical cold stowage capability to support expanded payload operations

Return:

    Catalytic Reactor Developmental Test Objective (DTO) - Developmental environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) unit returning for testing, teardown, and evaluation (TT&E) to determine the cause of failure and subsequent re-flight
    Urine Processing Assembly (UPA) Distillation Assembly - Critical ECLSS orbital replacement unit used for urine distillation, processing, and future use returning for TT&E and refurbishment to support future spares demand
    Sabatier Main Controller - Major Sabatier system hardware used in conjunction with the Oxygen Generation System (OGS) for water production needs on-orbit
    Rodent Research Habitats (AEM-X) - Habitats used during Rodent Research missions returning for refurbishment to support future missions in early 2022
    Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Recharge Tank Assembly (RTA) - Empty gas tanks returning for reuse to support high-pressure gas operations and activities on-orbit

Watch & Engage

Live coverage of the launch from Pad 39A from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center will air on NASA Television, the NASA app, and the agency’s website on June 3 at 1 p.m. ET with liftoff at 1:29 p.m. ET. The prelaunch news conference will be live at 1:30 p.m. ET on Wednesday, June 2. 

Arrival & Departure

The Dragon spacecraft will arrive at the space station and autonomously dock to the space-facing port of the Harmony module on the International Space Station at approximately 5 a.m June 5. Coverage of the rendezvous and docking will begin at 3:30 a.m. NASA astronauts Shane Kimbrough and Megan McArthur will monitor the arrival of the spacecraft, which will stay aboard the orbiting laboratory for about a month before splashing down and returning critical science and hardware to teams on Earth.




Offline Rondaz

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OCISLY droneship is currently offshore for a third day of underwater inspections/maintenance works.

https://twitter.com/SpaceXFleet/status/1398274998406684672

Offline Jansen

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Is anything known about static fire schedule for booster, or if the capsule and trunk are being integrated yet?

Payload LV mating is usually at L-5. So I would expect it tomorrow. Not sure about static fire testing, probably around Tuesday if it happens.

Edit: Capsule and trunk are integrated
« Last Edit: 05/28/2021 11:51 pm by Jansen »

Tags: cubesat 
 

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