Author Topic: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : CCSFS SLC-40 : ~May 2025  (Read 19478 times)

Offline crandles57

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #20 on: 02/03/2023 02:11 pm »
https://www.eoportal.org/satellite-missions/glide#eop-quick-facts-section

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The Carruthers Geocorona Observatory - formerly GLIDE (Global Lyman-alpha Imagers of the Dynamic Exosphere) is a NASA SmallSat mission to be launched with IMAP (Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe) as a part of NASA’s RideShare policy in 2025. GLIDE has been  selected as the science mission to accompany IMAP, and aims to study variability in the Earth’s exosphere from the inner Lagrangian point.

31 Jan 2023

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #21 on: 02/03/2023 03:20 pm »
Do you have a link to this or more information?

That's the extent of the publicly available text in the federal contracting database (I still use FPDS, I hate using SAM)

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #22 on: 03/15/2023 11:21 pm »
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NASA LAUNCH SERVICES II - SPACE EXPLORATION TECHNOLOGIES.  This modification adds Fit Check and Shock Separation Test for the Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration probe (IMAP) mission.

Offline waveney

Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #23 on: 09/26/2023 11:33 am »
NASA's Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe passes system integration review:

Article at Phys.org: https://phys.org/news/2023-09-nasa-interstellar-probe.html

Offline GWR64

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #24 on: 10/29/2023 01:55 pm »
https://www.l3harris.com/newsroom/editorial/2023/10/aerojet-rocketdyne-propulsion-integrated-nasas-imap-spacecraft?sf182531454
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Aerojet Rocketdyne Propulsion Integrated to NASA’s IMAP Spacecraft

Aerojet Rocketdyne
Oct 12, 2023 | 3 minute Read

The Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP), which will investigate two of the most important issues in space physics today, made an important stop at Aerojet Rocketdyne’s site in Redmond, Washington, before its 2025 launch.

As the sole propulsion provider on IMAP, Aerojet Rocketdyne, an L3Harris Technologies company, recently integrated the propulsion subsystem to the spacecraft for the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory, who is building the spacecraft and will operate it after launch. IMAP will investigate the acceleration of energetic particles and interaction of the solar wind with the interstellar medium.

"Aerojet Rocketdyne was in top form for this integration,” said Seth Kijewski, IMAP Propulsion Subsystem Lead at APL. “It’s really an exemplary display of what a hardworking, committed team can accomplish.”

The propulsion subsystem is comprised of three propellant tanks, two service valves, two latch valves, two system filters, and 12 MR-111G monopropellant rocket engines modules. Thermal control features were also integrated to the spacecraft. With the completion of this milestone, NASA is now one-step closer to flying the mission.

“During the four-month integration effort, there was a strong customer presence, which made it a very collaborative effort,” said Jack Deboer, IMAP program manager at Aerojet Rocketdyne. “Aerojet Rocketdyne is critical to this program and our thrusters will play a major role in helping scientists understand the risks posed to astronauts and technological systems that fly in space.”


IMAP will explore our solar neighborhood, helping researchers better understand what happens at the boundary of the heliosphere, where the Sun’s protective magnetic influence ends. With its extensive set of 10 instruments, the spacecraft will observe a vast range of particle energies and types in interplanetary space to simultaneously investigate two of the most important overarching issues in heliophysics – the energization of charged particles from the Sun, and interaction of the solar wind with the winds from other stars and other material that fills our galaxy.

IMAP will explore our solar neighborhood, helping researchers better understand what happens at the boundary of the heliosphere, where the Sun’s protective magnetic influence ends. With its extensive set of 10 instruments, the spacecraft will observe a vast range of particle energies and types in interplanetary space to simultaneously investigate two of the most important overarching issues in heliophysics – the energization of charged particles from the Sun, and interaction of the solar wind with the winds from other stars and other material that fills our galaxy.

“Aerojet Rocketdyne delivered the IMAP spacecraft to the customer ahead of the contract schedule,” added Deboer. “Ahead of schedule is always a bonus for a mission that has such an important job to do in understanding and decoding the messages in particles from the Sun and beyond.”

Princeton University professor and principal investigator David J. McComas leads the mission with an international team of 25 partner institutions. APL is managing the development phase, building the spacecraft, and will operate the mission. IMAP is the fifth mission in NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) Program portfolio. The Explorers and Heliophysics Projects Division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the STP Program for the agency’s Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.

attachment:
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NASA’s IMAP in the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory’s clean room, where the spacecraft will undergo testing and building over the next year
Image Credit: Johns Hopkins APL

Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : end 2025
« Reply #25 on: 12/04/2023 03:35 am »
https://spacenews.com/nasa-updating-policy-for-rideshare-missions/ [Dec 3]

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The launch of NASA’s Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) spacecraft on a Falcon 9, scheduled for February 2025, will include NOAA’s Space Weather Follow-On spacecraft and NASA’s Carruthers Geocorona Observatory, a heliophysics mission originally named GLIDE.
« Last Edit: 12/04/2023 03:36 am by spacenuance »

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : NET Feb 2025
« Reply #26 on: 01/11/2024 10:06 pm »
[U of Colorado Boulder] New instrument to capture stardust as part of NASA mission
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This week, the team carefully loaded the instrument, known as the Interstellar Dust Experiment (IDEX), onto a delivery truck. The instrument, which is shaped like a large drum and weighs 47 pounds, will travel to the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Maryland. There, engineers will begin the process of installing IDEX onto the IMAP spacecraft.

Offline StraumliBlight

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : NET Feb 2025
« Reply #27 on: 03/18/2024 02:21 pm »
Advanced Imager ready for Installation on IMAP Spacecraft

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Another of the instruments planned for flight aboard NASA’s Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) is ready for installation on the spacecraft.

IMAP-Ultra is a particle imager capable of capturing energetic neutral atoms (ENAs), particularly hydrogen atoms and is the third instrument to be delivered for integration. Engineers will now perform a series of tests to ensure Ultra can properly communicate with the spacecraft before it is fully integrated into the IMAP structure and into the onboard electronics system.



IMAP-Ultra is one of three imagers on IMAP that capture ENAs traveling from the boundary of our solar system. When charged particles from the solar wind reach our outer heliosphere, they interact with interstellar neutral particles and transform into ENAs. ENAs still retain information about the original charged particles, but losing their charge allows them to travel through space unbounded by the Sun’s magnetic field and eventually reach IMAP. The three imagers will capture data on ENAs at varying energy levels.

IMAP-Ultra also features unique gold-plated blades that deflect charged particles, allowing only neutral atoms to reach the instrument’s sensor.

Princeton University professor David J. McComas leads the IMAP mission with an international team of 25 partner institutions. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, builds the spacecraft and operates the mission. IMAP is the fifth mission in NASA’s Solar Terrestrial Probes (STP) program portfolio. The Explorers and Heliophysics Project Division at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the STP Program for the agency’s Heliophysics Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate.
« Last Edit: 03/18/2024 02:24 pm by StraumliBlight »

Offline StraumliBlight

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : NET Feb 2025
« Reply #28 on: 06/03/2024 11:13 pm »
High-energy Ion Telescope Instrument Ready for Installation on IMAP Spacecraft

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Scientists and engineers at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, are poised to deliver the High-energy Ion Telescope (HIT) instrument. HIT was shipped from Goddard to the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland. A group of engineers at APL have now begun the process of installing HIT onto NASA’s Interstellar Mapping and Acceleration Probe (IMAP) spacecraft.

A YouTube livestream shows the cleanroom where the spacecraft will be built and tested over the next year on Princeton University’s IMAP mission website. Viewers can watch the continuous stream to see exactly how the IMAP hardware develops from a bare-bones structure to the complex, fully operational spacecraft.

 HIT is the fourth of 10 IMAP instruments to arrive at APL. Over the two-year-long mission, HIT will measure high-energy solar energetic particles expelled from the Sun in the highest-energy processes in our solar system. These solar particles can produce the beautiful aurora, or northern and southern lights, but are also hazardous, posing risks to the health and safety of astronauts as well as presenting a danger to space- and ground-based assets and infrastructure. Understanding the acceleration and transport of this high-energy radiation will help us better understand our Sun and the local space weather to which these particles play a critical role.

“Solar energetic particles have been studied since the start of the space age, yet we still don’t understand their origin well enough to predict when they will be a danger,” said Eric Christian, HIT instrument lead and deputy principal investigator of the IMAP mission at NASA Goddard. “HIT, combined with other instruments on IMAP, will provide an important piece of the puzzle.”

IMAP, which is led by Princeton University, is slated to launch in 2025 and will journey roughly one million miles to a point in space between Earth and the Sun called Lagrange Point 1. During the mission, HIT will measure energetic ions and electrons to help us learn more about the processes that can accelerate these particles to such high energies.

Building on Heritage

HIT builds upon techniques that are decades old but modernizes them with state-of-the-art instrumentation and clever detector design. When charged particles pass through HIT, they deposit some of their energy in layers of detector material until they finally come to rest. By looking at the energy deposited in the different layers through which the particle passed and comparing it with the energy deposited in the stopping layer, HIT can determine the type (proton, electron, or different ions) and energy of the particle.

The arrangement of 10 apertures, or openings, on HIT and the spin of the IMAP spacecraft will allow HIT to measure particles from all directions and study the energetic particles patterns when  striking the instrument. HIT also measures energetic electrons, which arrive at Earth quickly and can give us an early warning to upcoming space weather events.

The Work of a Team

HIT would not be possible without its dedicated and diverse group of scientists, engineers, and technicians at NASA Goddard and the California Institute of Technology. The HIT team includes many early career scientists and engineers who got the exciting opportunity to take on leadership roles and rose to the challenge. For many, this will be the first time they will have the unique opportunity to work on something going to space.

“I am so grateful to have the opportunity to play an integral role in such an exciting mission,” said Grant Mitchell, a member of the HIT science team at NASA Goddard. “The chance to learn from world-class scientists and engineers both at Goddard and throughout the IMAP team has been instrumental in preparing me to lead my own missions one day.”

https://twitter.com/NASASun/status/1795485260425130052
« Last Edit: 06/03/2024 11:18 pm by StraumliBlight »

Offline StraumliBlight

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : SLC-40 : NET Feb 2025
« Reply #29 on: 06/16/2024 09:40 pm »
The June 18th NASA Heliophysics Division Update to HPAC presentation shows IMAP and Carruthers Geocorona Observatory launching "~May 2025".

The meeting might also confirm if the 6U EZIE cubesats are on Transporter-12 as they're launching October 2024.
« Last Edit: 06/16/2024 09:40 pm by StraumliBlight »

Offline GewoonLukas_

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : CCSFS SLC-40 : ~May 2025
« Reply #30 on: 06/20/2024 05:48 pm »
Some interesting bits about some issues with the Falcon 9 launch vehicle. The delay to May 2025 also has been confirmed:

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GAO: Assessments of Major Projects
June 2024

[...]

Cost and Schedule Status
[...]
The IMAP project entered the system assembly, integration and test, and launch phase—Phase D—in December 2023. It also decided to move the internal launch date from February 2025 to May 2025 due to delays in instrument development. The new date still falls within the project’s schedule baseline.
[...]

Launch Vehicle
[...]
As IMAP approaches integration, the project has concerns regarding the launch vehicle requirements in three areas:

Coupled loads analysis: The coupled loads analysis is necessary to understand the environment that the spacecraft and instruments experience during launch. A project official stated that they received the initial analysis data approximately 10 months later than scheduled. In addition, the data provided did not include the complete launch configuration, meaning that the current estimate will require additional data and refinement. The next data delivery is not until June 2024, but the project is working with NASA and SpaceX to obtain interim data sooner.

Fairing access: The project initially planned to be able to access the fairing, which is the top of the rocket that houses its payload, very close to launch to remove covers meant to prevent contamination to IMAP’s sensitive instruments. Access to the fairing so late in the launch campaign presented challenges to SpaceX's process. The IMAP team reassessed the need for access to the fairing and late removal of instrument covers and determined that they will only need access for contingencies. The project is coordinating additional mitigations to ensure proper cleaning of the fairing with SpaceX and the payload processing facility.

Nutation: The project was concerned about SpaceX’s ability to meet the project’s requirements to limit nutation, which refers to a small disturbance of the wobble caused by the spacecraft spinning on its axis. If the launch vehicle exceeds the nutation requirement, the spacecraft may need to perform additional maneuvers. While SpaceX’s current projections indicate an amount of nutation above what the project required, an IMAP official told us the project can accept those projections if they are accurate. The project may be able to close the nutation issue once NASA Launch Services Program Independent Verification and Validation confirms SpaceX’s nutation analysis.

[...]
« Last Edit: 06/21/2024 07:35 am by GewoonLukas_ »
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Offline Jim

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : CCSFS SLC-40 : ~May 2025
« Reply #31 on: 06/20/2024 06:35 pm »
Some interesting bits about some issues with the Falcon 9 launch vehicle. The delay to May 2025 also has been confirmed:

[...]
As IMAP approaches integration, the project has concerns regarding the launch vehicle requirements in three areas:


Fairing access: The project initially planned to be able to access the fairing, which is the top of the rocket that houses its payload, very close to launch to remove covers meant to prevent contamination to IMAP’s sensitive instruments. Access to the fairing so late in the launch campaign presented challenges to SpaceX's process. The IMAP team reassessed the need for access to the fairing and late removal of instrument covers and determined that they will only need access for contingencies. The project is coordinating additional mitigations to ensure proper cleaning of the fairing with SpaceX and the payload processing facility.




They were being idiots about this.  They were introducing more risk with the late access.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2024 06:35 pm by Jim »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : CCSFS SLC-40 : ~May 2025
« Reply #32 on: 06/20/2024 08:42 pm »
Some interesting bits about some issues with the Falcon 9 launch vehicle. The delay to May 2025 also has been confirmed:

[...]
As IMAP approaches integration, the project has concerns regarding the launch vehicle requirements in three areas:


Fairing access: The project initially planned to be able to access the fairing, which is the top of the rocket that houses its payload, very close to launch to remove covers meant to prevent contamination to IMAP’s sensitive instruments. Access to the fairing so late in the launch campaign presented challenges to SpaceX's process. The IMAP team reassessed the need for access to the fairing and late removal of instrument covers and determined that they will only need access for contingencies. The project is coordinating additional mitigations to ensure proper cleaning of the fairing with SpaceX and the payload processing facility.
They were being idiots about this.  They were introducing more risk with the late access.
Yes, I was wondering how all the other space science and earth science missions "made do" without such access to instrument covers throughout the Space Age.
« Last Edit: 06/20/2024 09:03 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline ugordan

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Re: SpaceX F9 : IMAP : CCSFS SLC-40 : ~May 2025
« Reply #33 on: 06/22/2024 08:44 am »
They were being idiots about this.  They were introducing more risk with the late access.

By "they" I take it you mean the IMAP team?

On a somewhat related note, how does one shield uncovered optics during fairing sep? I've seen some forward-facing cameras during fairing deploy and it's clear that, when the fairing halves fall into the MVac plume, there's some gas and particulate matter blasted forwards, toward the payload. Isn't that a liability on any F9 launch? A Centaur produces H20, that can be heated-off, but soot from a kerolox engine, not so much?

Maybe I'm making a big fuss about nothing since F9 has launched several optical missions, latest being ESA's Euclid with no adverse effects, but I'm still curious.
« Last Edit: 06/22/2024 08:49 am by ugordan »

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