Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - KSC LC-39A - 13 October 2023 (14:19 UTC)  (Read 188888 times)

Offline ulm_atms

  • Rocket Junky
  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 930
  • To boldly go where no government has gone before.
  • Liked: 1565
  • Likes Given: 778
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #40 on: 07/09/2020 04:23 pm »
Isn't KPLO hitching a ride with Psyche? So is this going on a F9 or FH?  This quote says F9 for KPLO and the title says FH for Psyche.  I'm just confused at this point.

To clear up the confusion:

* Psyche (along with 2 EscaPADE and 2 Janus space probes) will fly on a Falcon Heavy
* KPLO will fly on a Falcon-9

Thank you.  Just reading page 2 on this thread made made me go "Wait...what?"

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10229
  • US
  • Liked: 13938
  • Likes Given: 5968
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #41 on: 08/26/2020 03:17 am »
Isn't KPLO hitching a ride with Psyche? So is this going on a F9 or FH?  This quote says F9 for KPLO and the title says FH for Psyche.  I'm just confused at this point.

To clear up the confusion:

* Psyche (along with 2 EscaPADE and 2 Janus space probes) will fly on a Falcon Heavy
* KPLO will fly on a Falcon-9

In a ridesharing presentation today it was noted that EscaPADE may be removed from this flight, apparently they're having trouble getting the trajectory needs of all three passengers to work out together and EscaPADE would need to be redesigned with a larger propulsion system.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #42 on: 08/26/2020 02:52 pm »
https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1298009434447179776

Quote
#PI_Daily

Tomorrow and next day is very exciting Mission Systems Requirements Review (MSRR) for the LAUNCH!

2 days on mech and elec interfaces, loads, acoustics, shock, cleanliness, ground ops, and more, w @SpaceX, @NASA launch sys providers, and the @MissionToPsyche  team.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #43 on: 08/26/2020 04:45 pm »
https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1298660079957209088

Quote
Right this minute, talking about purging, and measuring water content in purge in metallic vs teflon fittings. Whoa, the complexity! Space exploration is an incredibly achievement.

Edit to add:

https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1298668212398067712

Quote
This morning in @MissionToPsyche review w @SpaceX we talked a lot about shock and vibe - critical not to exceed instrument tolerances, and requires detailed finite element modeling. Now, limits on radiated emissions from launch vehicle and s/c. #PI_Daily
« Last Edit: 08/26/2020 05:11 pm by FutureSpaceTourist »

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10229
  • US
  • Liked: 13938
  • Likes Given: 5968
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #44 on: 09/14/2020 04:31 pm »
Confirmation that Escapade has been removed from the flight:
https://twitter.com/jeff_foust/status/1305526413257211904
Quote
Glaze: The EscaPADE smallsat mission to study the Martian atmosphere has passed PDR, but won’t launch with Psyche as originally planned; will be remanifested on a future flight. #LEAG2020

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373

Offline leovinus

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1109
  • Porto, Portugal
  • Liked: 879
  • Likes Given: 1736
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #48 on: 01/31/2021 07:27 pm »
Quote
Day 2 @MissionToPsyche  Launch Vehicle Preliminary Design Review, w @SpaceX .

Ex of complexity: We need to know how much particulate matter will coat the s/c, from all sources, while in fairing & going to pad & launching. Requirement: less than 0.5% surface obscuration.
https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1354928685497782273

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #49 on: 02/02/2021 03:54 pm »
https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/nasas-psyche-mission-moves-forward-passing-key-milestone

Quote
NASA’s Psyche Mission Moves Forward, Passing Key Milestone
Feb 02, 2021

Now just a year and a half from launch, the mission to explore a metal-rich asteroid will soon begin assembling and testing the spacecraft.

NASA’s Psyche mission has passed a critical milestone that moves it a step closer to launch. After an intense review of the mission’s progress in building its science instruments and engineering systems, Psyche won clearance to progress into what NASA calls Phase D of its life cycle – the final phase of operations prior to its scheduled launch in August 2022.

Until now, the mission has focused on planning, designing, and building the body of the spacecraft, its solar-electric propulsion system, the three science instruments, electronics, the power subsystem, and the like. The successful review of those elements means the mission can now begin delivering components to NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which manages the mission and will test, assemble, and integrate each piece.

“It’s really the final phase, when all of the puzzle pieces are coming together and we’re getting on the rocket. This is the most intense part of everything that happens on the ground,” said Arizona State University’s Lindy Elkins-Tanton, who as principal investigator for Psyche leads the mission.

Psyche’s target is an intriguing, metal-rich asteroid of the same name, which orbits the Sun in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Scientists think that, unlike rocky or icy asteroids, Psyche is largely iron and nickel and could be the heart of an early planet that lost its outer layers. Exploring the asteroid Psyche (about 140 miles, or 226 kilometers, wide) could lend valuable insight into how Earth and other planets formed.

The Psyche spacecraft will use a magnetometer to detect a potential magnetic field; if the asteroid has one, it’s a strong indicator that it once was the core of an early planet. A multispectral imager will capture images of the surface, as well as gather information about the asteroid’s composition and topography. Spectrometers will analyze the neutrons and gamma rays coming from the surface to reveal the elements that make up the object.

The main structure of the spacecraft, called the Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Chassis, was designed and built by Maxar Technologies and is nearly complete. The Maxar team in Palo Alto, California, is preparing to ship it to JPL’s main clean room in March, when assembly, test, and launch operations begin.

Each instrument will then undergo further testing. That includes a laser technology demonstration called Deep Space Optical Communications, led by JPL, which uses a super-efficient method of transmitting data with photons, or fundamental particles of visible light. Also undergoing testing will be the thermal, telecommunications, propulsion, power, avionics, and other engineering subsystems, along with the flight computer.

“The project has made tremendous progress, particularly given the world around us and COVID-19 and dealing with the constraints that imposes,” said JPL’s Henry Stone, the Psyche project manager. “We’re in very good shape. We’re on track and have a plan to go forward to make launch.”

Although engineers and technicians have had to deal with shutdowns forced by the pandemic and to adhere to additional safety protocols for those doing hands-on work on the spacecraft, the project remains on schedule.

“The fact that we can still make this happen and we’re overcoming our challenges feels near-miraculous,” Elkins-Tanton said. “And it’s also an incredible gift to keep us all focused and moving forward in a difficult time. So reaching this milestone has special meaning – not just for this project that we’ve been working on for a decade, but also because of what’s been happening more recently in all of our lives.”

By spring of 2022, the spacecraft will be fully assembled and ready to ship to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, where it will launch in August 2022. Psyche will fly by Mars for a gravity assist in May 2023. And in early 2026, it will slip into orbit around the asteroid, where it will spend 21 months gathering data for analysis.

More About the Mission

ASU leads the mission. JPL in Southern California is responsible for the mission’s overall management, system engineering, integration and test, and mission operations. Maxar is providing a high-power solar electric propulsion spacecraft chassis.

For more information about NASA’s Psyche mission go to:

http://www.nasa.gov/psyche

https://psyche.asu.edu/

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #50 on: 03/16/2021 08:43 pm »
https://twitter.com/maxar/status/1371920152133054465

Quote
This month, our teams installed @MissionToPsyche's High Gain Antenna & moved the Solar Electric Propulsion Chassis to the alignment stand for near-final preparations. Psyche will explore a metal #asteroid which may be core material from an early planet. psyche.asu.edu

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #51 on: 03/22/2021 05:55 am »
https://twitter.com/bluemoondance74/status/1373141325688766471

Quote
56-second clip of the Falcon Heavy center core static fire 🔥🚀☀️ #SpaceX #McGregorTX

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #52 on: 03/29/2021 07:57 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/jpl/nasa-begins-final-assembly-of-spacecraft-destined-for-asteroid-psyche/

Quote
NASA Begins Final Assembly of Spacecraft Destined for Asteroid Psyche

In late March of 2021, a main component of NASA’s Psyche spacecraft was delivered to JPL, where assembly, test, and launch operations are underway.

Set to launch next year, the agency’s Psyche spacecraft will explore a metal-rich asteroid in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

A major component of NASA’s Psyche spacecraft has been delivered to the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Southern California, where the phase known as assembly, test, and launch operations is now underway. Over the next year, the spacecraft will finish assembly and undergo rigorous checkout and testing before it’s shipped to Cape Canaveral, Florida, for an August 2022 launch to the main asteroid belt.

The Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP) Chassis, crafted by Maxar Technologies’ team in Palo Alto, California, is the size of a van and represents more than 80% (by mass) of the hardware that will ultimately make up the Psyche spacecraft. The large, box-shaped structure made a dramatic entrance as it rolled into the white-walled clean room of JPL’s storied High Bay 1 of the Spacecraft Assembly Facility. Some of the chassis’ most visible features include the 6.5-foot-wide (2-meter-wide) high-gain antenna, the frame that will hold the science instruments, and bright red protective covers to safeguard delicate hardware.

“Seeing this big spacecraft chassis arrive at JPL from Maxar is among the most thrilling of the milestones we’ve experienced on what has already been a 10-year journey,” said Arizona State University’s Lindy Elkins-Tanton, who as principal investigator leads the Psyche mission. “Building this complex, precision piece of engineering during the year of COVID is absolutely a triumph of human determination and excellence.”

Psyche’s target is a metal-rich asteroid of the same name, which orbits the Sun in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. Scientists think that Psyche is largely iron and nickel and could be the core of an early planet. Exploring the asteroid Psyche (about 140 miles, or 226 kilometers, wide) could lend valuable insight into how Earth and other planets formed.

Over the next 12 months, the project team will be working against the clock to meet deadlines in the runup to launch.

“It’s exciting watching it all come together, and it’s the part of the project life cycle that I love the most,” said Psyche Project Manager Henry Stone of JPL. “But it’s a really intense phase as well. It’s intricate choreography, and if one activity runs into a problem, it can impact the whole process. Staying on schedule at this phase of the mission is absolutely critical.”

The SEP Chassis comes to JPL with most of the engineering hardware systems already integrated. The Maxar team built the entire structure and integrated the hardware needed for the high-power electrical system, the propulsion systems, the thermal system, and the guidance and navigation system. The Psyche mission will take advantage of Maxar’s superefficient electric propulsion system to push Psyche through deep space. Maxar will also deliver the large, twin five-panel solar arrays that provide the power for the spacecraft systems.

Delivering the SEP Chassis to NASA’s JPL is an incredible accomplishment for us at Maxar,” said Steven Scott, Maxar’s Psyche program manager. “I am so proud of our team. We’ve managed to design and build an SEP spacecraft for a billion-mile journey through a low-power environment, all while prioritizing the health and safety of our team during a global pandemic. The collaboration between Maxar, Arizona State University, and NASA’s JPL is a model for success, and we’re honored to be part of the Psyche Mission.”

Building and Testing 

The assembly, test, and launch operations phase kicked off March 16, when engineers gathered in High Bay 1 to begin checking out the JPL-supplied subsystems, the flight computer, the communications system, and the low-power distribution system to be sure they work together. Now that the chassis has arrived, JPL and Maxar engineers will begin installing the remaining hardware, testing as they go.

The mission’s three science instruments will arrive at JPL over the next few months. The magnetometer will investigate the asteroid’s potential magnetic field. The multispectral imager will capture images of its surface. And the spectrometer will analyze the neutrons and gamma rays coming from the surface to determine the elements that make up the asteroid. JPL is also providing a technology demonstration instrument that will test high data-rate laser communications that could be used by future NASA missions.

NASA’s Psyche spacecraft
After its delivery to JPL in late March of 2021, NASA’s Psyche spacecraft chassis was attached to a rotation fixture, where it will be integrated with additional flight hardware three science instruments. Once assembled, the spacecraft will ship to Cape Canaveral, Florida, for an August 2022 launch.

Once the full spacecraft is assembled, the orbiter will move from the Spacecraft Assembly Facility to JPL’s large thermal vacuum chamber – a massive undertaking in itself – to simulate the harsh environment of deep space. The chamber is where JPL engineers will begin the heavy-duty testing to ensure the entire machine can survive deep space, thrust with the electric propulsion system, take science measurements, and communicate with Earth.   

By next spring, the fully assembled Psyche will be shipped to NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in advance of its August 2022 target launch date. The spacecraft will fly by Mars for a gravity assist in May 2023 and in early 2026, will go into orbit around the asteroid, where it will spend 21 months gathering science data.

More About the Mission

ASU leads the mission. JPL is responsible for the mission’s overall management, system engineering, integration and testing, and mission operations. Psyche is the 14th mission selected as part of NASA’s Discovery Program.

For more information about NASA’s Psyche mission go to:

http://www.nasa.gov/psyche

https://psyche.asu.edu/

Still on track for August 2022.
« Last Edit: 03/29/2021 08:01 pm by Jansen »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 48462
  • UK
    • Plan 28
  • Liked: 82195
  • Likes Given: 37086
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #53 on: 04/16/2021 12:21 am »
https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1382396938088157184

Quote
Right now the @MissionToPsyche team is getting briefed on our @SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch. Whoa.

#PI_Daily

https://twitter.com/ltelkins/status/1382400121220997120

Quote
Launching on all-new hardware, have passed PDR for integration, teams meet every week, launching August 2022!

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #54 on: 04/16/2021 02:15 am »
Quote
Launching on all-new hardware

Wow, that’s unexpected. But maybe it’ll be reused for Artemis?

Offline kaa

  • Member
  • Posts: 50
  • Greenbelt MD
  • Liked: 91
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #55 on: 06/03/2021 08:27 pm »
I listened to a fine talk by the PI today. She commented that using a standard satellite bus from Maxar instead of having someone build a bespoke spacecraft saved them about $100 million. A lot of the spacecraft interior volume is just empty space. She also described herself as unreasonably excited about the possibility of recovering the boosters.

Offline Jim

  • Night Gator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 37502
  • Cape Canaveral Spaceport
  • Liked: 21554
  • Likes Given: 429
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #56 on: 06/03/2021 08:46 pm »
Quote
Launching on all-new hardware

Wow, that’s unexpected. But maybe it’ll be reused for Artemis?

How?

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #57 on: 06/04/2021 12:39 am »
Quote
Launching on all-new hardware

Wow, that’s unexpected. But maybe it’ll be reused for Artemis?

How?

I’m assuming at least the side boosters will be recovered. That would mean an inventory of at least 8 FH side boosters.

Considering the number of FH launches needed for Artemis and Gateway, it’s not unreasonable to think they would be used for that program.
« Last Edit: 06/04/2021 12:49 am by Jansen »

Offline Jansen

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Liked: 2235
  • Likes Given: 373

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10229
  • US
  • Liked: 13938
  • Likes Given: 5968
Re: SpaceX Falcon Heavy - Psyche - 39A - August 2022
« Reply #59 on: 06/04/2021 01:03 am »
May 17, 2021
Modification to "remove ESCAPADE as a secondary payload along with ESCAPADE's mass simulators, incorporate a trajectory trade study, and include the JANUS do no harm assessment"

Tags: Psyche Falcon Heavy 
 

Advertisement NovaTech
Advertisement Northrop Grumman
Advertisement
Advertisement Margaritaville Beach Resort South Padre Island
Advertisement Brady Kenniston
Advertisement NextSpaceflight
Advertisement Nathan Barker Photography
0