Author Topic: Soyuz-ST-A/Fregat-M VS25 - CSO 2 - December 29, 2020 (16:42 UTC)  (Read 24834 times)

Offline GWR64

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Final scheduled orbital launch of 2020 for planet Earth! :)
https://twitter.com/arianespaceceo/status/1343313595980001282
Quote
Ready for flight! The launch readiness review has cleared our medium-lift Soyuz for tomorrow’s VS25 mission with the CSO-2 satellite, which will support French Earth observation capabilities in defense & security applications.

hmm..., missions length 3hr, 51min, 40sek  ???

the launch kit says:
+ 1h 51min.40s Fourth Fregat burn (for deorbiting)
+ 1h 52min.35s Fourth Fregat burn cut-off
+ 1h 53min.15s End of the Arianespace mission



@arianespaceceo deleted his tweet with the obviously wrong mission duration.
But it is still that on https://www.arianespace.com . (pic VS25)
The source for the wrong mission duration is obviously the Soyuz ST29 flight. (pic ST29) source twitter @Arianespace
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 08:45 am by GWR64 »

Offline Mammutti

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https://twitter.com/Arianespace/status/1343897500147712000

Quote from: Arianespace
#Soyuz flight #VS25: based on predicted meteorological conditions over Europe’s Spaceport, our teams just gave a go to resume launch operations, fueling of the launcher ongoing. Liftoff targeted today at 01:42p.m. local time (05:42p.m. CET), #CSO-2 onboard. @CNES @Armees_Gouv

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Offline jacqmans

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December 29, 2020

Arianespace Flight VS25: Final countdown underway for the Soyuz launch with France’s CSO-2 defense and security satellite

Based on anticipated meteorological conditions above the Spaceport, launch operations have been given the go-ahead for today’s Arianespace Flight VS25 with Soyuz from French Guiana.

Liftoff is set at exactly 01:42 p.m. local time (16:42 UTC) for a mission lasting just under one hour.

Soyuz will deploy the French CSO-2 defense and security satellite into Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of approximately 480 km.

https://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/final-countdown-underway-vs25/
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

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Jacques :-)

Offline kdhilliard

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Webcast (French / English overdubbed) showing a live pad view and scrolling:
Quote
The VS25 launch webcast will start at 04:25 PM UTC.
La videotransmission du lancement VS25 débutera à 16h25 TU.

Edit: Webcasts are live and it is now T-1 minute.  Hope someone is covering this -- I don't have the bandwith to do so here.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 03:41 pm by kdhilliard »

Offline Mammutti

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Liftoff!

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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Fregat separates from Blok I (3rd stage), followed by Fregat ignition.
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1343963684381589510
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Ride uphill was nominal. Now on to the first burn of the Fregat-M Upper Stage.

This stage is designed to be capable of 20 burns, according to the Arianespace commentary (not that it ever has).

Commentator telling story of French-Soviet/Russian cooperation re: Soyuz talks through the end of the first Fregat burn--elliptical orbit.
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1343965762529189889
Quote
SECO-1. Arianespace TV was too busy chatting to notice.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 04:10 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Some coverage catch-up :) :
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1343961289899565062
Quote
Staging. There go the boosters. Great tracking camera.

https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1343962444776013828
Quote
Fairing sep. 1-2 sep (hot staging - fires up the engine while still attached, then stages).
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Flight sequence, from the launch kit (corrected typo in launch kit):
HO 00 s                  Liftoff
+ 1 min. 58 s          Jettisoning of boosters
+ 4 min. 15 s          Jettisoning of fairing
+ 4 min. 47 s          Separation of central core (second stage)
+ 8 min. 49 s          Separation of 3rd stage
+ 9 min. 49 s          First Fregat burn
+ 18 min. 29 s        First Fregat burn cut-off
+ 54 min. 07 s        Second Fregat burn
+ 54 min. 15 s        Second Fregat burn cut-off
+ 59 min. 37 s        Separation of CSO-2
+ 1 h 36 min. 40 s   Third Fregat burn
+ 1 h 37 min. 30 s   Third Fregat burn cut-off
+ 1 h 51 min. 40 s   Fourth Fregat burn (for deorbiting)
+ 1 h 52 min. 35 s   Fourth Fregat burn cut-off
+ 1 h 53 min. 15 s   End of the Arianespace mission
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 04:40 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Flight sequence, from the launch kit:
<snip>
+ 54 min. 07 s        Second Fregat burn
+ 54 min. 15 s        Second Fregat burn cut-off
+ 59 min. 37 s        Separation of CSO-2
+ 1 h 36 min. 40 s   Third Fregat burn
+ 1 h 37 min. 30 s   Third Fregat burn cut-off
+ 1 h 51 min. 40 s   Fourth Fregat burn (for deorbiting)
+ 1 h 52 min. 35 s   Fourth Fregat burn cut-off
+ 1 h 53 min. 15 s   End of the Arianespace mission
From the launch kit: The third Fregat burn is for collision avoidance with CSO-2.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 04:41 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Timing for second Fregat burn (orbit circularization), followed by spacecraft separation, is approaching.
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Second Fregat burn confirmed.
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Spacecraft separation confirmed!
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/1343976603727130624

Post-successful s/c separation speeches to follow.  (Live from Kourou, followed by recorded.)
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 04:53 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline zubenelgenubi

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Highlights of Arianespace 2021 launches from Stephane Israel: but no specific mention of next launch.

Well-wishes for the new year from the web cast to all of us, followed by brief launch replays at the conclusion of the live stream.
« Last Edit: 12/29/2020 05:07 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline jacqmans

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PRESS RELEASE / FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Flight VS25: Arianespace orbits the CSO-2 military observation satellite for France

For its 10th and final launch of the year, Arianespace used a Soyuz rocket to orbit the CSO-2 defense and security observation satellite for the French CNES space agency (Centre National d’Etudes Spatiales) and DGA defense procurement agency (Direction générale de l’armement), on behalf of the French armed forces.

With this launch, Arianespace has once again demonstrated its ability to ensure independent access to space for France and Europe.

The latest success from the Guiana Space Center confirms the flexibility of Soyuz, occurring just 10 days after the medium-lift vehicle’s first commercial launch operated by Arianespace and its Starsem affiliate from Russia’s Vostochny Cosmodrome.

On Tuesday, December 29, 2020 at 1:42 p.m. local time, Arianespace successfully launched an Earth observation satellite for defense and security purposes from the Guiana Space Center, Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana (South America), using a medium-lift Soyuz launcher.

This payload, CSO-2, is the second dedicated military observation satellite in France’s Optical Space Component (CSO – Composante Spatiale Optique), a program conducted by CNES and DGA for operation by the French Armed Forces and the country’s Space Command.

“I want to thank the Arianespace teams for their unwavering commitment throughout this exceptional year, as well as CNES and the French Ministry of the Armed Forces for their renewed confidence on the occasion of this second launch of a satellite in the Optical Space Component. Many thanks to all the employees of the Space Center and to CNES, also, for mobilizing with us for this last mission of the year, which closes the global launches 2020. And congratulations to our Russian partners and our legendary Soyuz rocket for this third success in less than a month,” declared Stéphane Israël, the Arianespace Chief Executive Officer, several minutes after the launch. “We’re all the more proud of this success knowing that the Optical Space Component satellites will provide invaluable support in accomplishing the missions of women and men who are engaged daily in theaters of operations.”

The Optical Space Component comprises three identical satellites placed in polar orbits at different altitudes, with two assigned missions: reconnaissance for CSO-1 and CSO-3; identification for CSO-2. As a successor to the Helios 1 and 2 systems, the CSO system meets France’s operational requirements for global intelligence and strategic surveillance, providing up-to-date information about the geographic environment and in the support of operations. The CSO program is developed in a national framework within the program MUSIS (Multinational Space-based Imaging System).

The CSO-2 satellite will acquire very-high-resolution images in the visible and infrared wavelengths – day or night and in fair weather – using a variety of imaging modes to meet a broad range of operational needs.

CSO-2 is the 45th satellite launched by Arianespace for CNES and DGA. The CSO 1 spacecraft also was orbited by a Soyuz from the Guiana Space Center, with its launch performed on December 19, 2018.

Arianespace’s order book backlog now includes 10 more missions for French institutions (CNES/DGA): CSO-3; Syracuse 4A and 4B; three satellites for the CERES system; and four satellites for the CO3D system (in partnership with Airbus Defence and Space).

Airbus Defence and Space France built the CSO-2 satellite as prime contractor, with Thales Alenia Space France supplying the optical instrument. CSO-2 was the 130th satellite built by Airbus Defence and Space to be launched by Arianespace.

Including today’s mission, Arianespace has now launched 75 defense and security satellites: 53 for France and its European partners, along with 22 for export. These spacecraft were designed for applications in secure telecommunications, as well as for Earth observation.

Today’s launch, the 25th with Soyuz mission since its introduction at the Guiana Space Center in 2011, was Arianespace’s 10th and final launch of 2020. The year’s five Soyuz flights were conducted from three different spaceports: the Guiana Space Center; Baikonur Cosmodrome; and Vostochny Cosmodrome – providing exceptional flexibility for Arianespace’s launch services offering.

Jacques :-)

Offline Lewis007

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A couple of high-res launch pics.

PS: I haven't seen any "launch art" (launch sticker, or "autocollant") for this mission or the previous one or two Arianespace launches. Has this tradition been skipped?

Offline jacqmans

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December 29, 2020

Soyuz orbits the French CSO-2 Earth observation satellite on Arianespace’s 10th launch of 2020

Arianespace’s workhorse Soyuz was back in action today, delivering the French CSO-2 Earth observation satellite into Sun-synchronous orbit from the Spaceport.

This afternoon’s launch, which began at the exact liftoff time of 1:42:07 p.m. in French Guiana, deployed the spacecraft passenger during a mission lasting just under one hour.

It was Arianespace’s 10th and final flight of 2020 – and the fifth this year using the medium-lift vehicle – coming just 11 days after another Soyuz was launched by the company and its Starsem affiliate from Russia’s Vostochny Cosmodrome to deliver 36 satellites for the OneWeb constellation.

Soyuz brings exceptional flexibility to Arianespace

The 2020 operations with Soyuz underscored the medium-lift launcher’s exceptional flexibility for Arianespace’s launch services offering, having been utilized during the year from three different facilities: the Guiana Space Center in South America; Kazakhstan’s Baikonur Cosmodrome; and Vostochny Cosmodrome in Russia.

Today’s mission, designated Flight VS25 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, utilized a Soyuz ST-A version and was performed for the French CNES space agency and the DGA defense procurement agency. The CSO-2 satellite will be operated on behalf of the French armed forces and the country’s Space Command.

CSO-2 serves the defense and security needs of France, as well as the requirements of several partner countries, acquiring very-high-resolution images in the visible and infrared wavelengths – day or night and in fair weather – using a variety of imaging modes to meet a broad range of operational needs.

Arianespace’s second launch for the French CSO program
France’s Optical Space Component (CSO – Composante Spatiale Optique) program is composed of three satellites serving two mission requirements: reconnaissance for CSO-1 and CSO-3; identification for CSO-2. The initial satellite in this system, CSO-1, was orbited by Arianespace on a Soyuz mission in December 2018 that also was performed from the Spaceport in French Guiana.

Airbus Defence and Space France is prime contractor for the CSO satellites, while Thales Alenia Space France supplies the optical imaging instrument. On today’s mission, CSO-2 was the 130th Airbus Defence and Space-built satellite launched by Arianespace.

For Flight VS25, Soyuz lifted off from its purpose-built ELS launch complex, which is situated Spaceport’s northwestern sector near the town of Sinnamary. This was the 25th mission from French Guiana with Soyuz since the launcher’s introduction at the Spaceport in October 2011.

https://www.arianespace.com/mission-update/soyuz-orbits-the-french-cso-2-earth-observation-satellite-on-arianespaces-10th-launch-of-2020/
Jacques :-)

Offline jacqmans

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CSO-2 SATELLITE IN ORBIT
12/29/2020


Latest success reflects the excellence of Europe’s optical observation spacecraft

Cannes, December 29, 2020 – Following the launch of CSO-1 in December 2018, the CSO-2 military observation satellite was successfully launched today by Arianespace using a Soyuz rocket from the Guiana Space Center, Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana. Featuring a very-high-resolution optical instrument built by Thales Alenia Space, the joint company between Thales (67%) and Leonardo (33%), the satellite was developed by Airbus Defence and Space as prime contractor for the Armament General Directorate (DGA), with French space agency CNES as delegated contracting authority.

CSO, the optical space component
 
Developed within the scope of MUSIS (Multinational Space-based Imaging System for surveillance, reconnaissance and observation), the CSO (Composante Spatiale Optique) family comprises three observation satellites in Sun-synchronous orbit, each fitted with a very-high-resolution optical instrument. This system, a successor to Helios 2, is intended for French defense applications, and will help enhance the country’s capabilities in intelligence and operational support. Featuring higher image resolution than the previous generation, the instrument operates day and night, and also offers greater agility to take successive images of crisis zones. In addition, it can deliver a greater number of images taken in a single pass over a given zone.

Thales Alenia Space supplies the very-high-resolution optical observation instrument for the three CSO satellites, as it did for the six satellites in the Helios 1, Helios 2 and Pleiades families.

The company also developed key equipment, including the solar arrays, high-throughput image telemetry, the encryption/decryption modules for uplinks and downlinks as well as the telemetry, tracking and command transponders.

The most powerful “space camera” ever built in Europe
 
The CSO instrument offers significant improvements over Helios 2, including new detectors in the visible and infrared bands, more highly integrated video electronics, a new cooling system for the infrared channel and a new ceramic frame for the telescope to ensure exceptional stability. Robust, reliable and stable, the very-high-resolution optical instrument on CSO satellites can take razor-sharp photos of scenes despite the highly demanding orbital environment, while traveling at 25,000 km/hour from Low Earth orbit.

“Today we are celebrating the launch of CSO-2, featuring the most powerful ‘space camera’ ever built in Europe,” said Hervé Derrey, President and Chief Executive Officer of Thales Alenia Space. “We are very proud to have built its telephoto lens and electronics, the brains of the satellite. To develop this instrument, we called on the full sum of our experience in building the optical instruments for the six satellites in the Helios 1, Helios 2 and Pleiades families, allowing us to offer an instrument with unrivaled performance.”

“This year has been an extremely successful one for Thales Alenia Space’s Earth observation activities,” said Massimo Comparini, Head of the Observation, Exploration and Navigation business at Thales Alenia Space. “After having won five contracts for Europe’s vast environmental monitoring program, Copernicus Expansion, including three as prime, one contract to build two additional COSMO-SkyMed Second Generation satellites, we’re closing out the year on a high note with this impressive launch. The CSO-2 instrument is the state-of-the-art in very-high-resolution optical payloads for intelligence and defense operations support.”

https://www.thalesgroup.com/en/worldwide/space/press-release/cso-2-satellite-orbit
« Last Edit: 12/30/2020 06:09 am by jacqmans »
Jacques :-)

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