Author Topic: Space applications of perovskite solar cells  (Read 519 times)

Offline Nilof

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Space applications of perovskite solar cells
« on: 02/21/2019 08:22 am »
So, Perovskites are steadily maturing as a competitor to Silicon for high performance solar cells.

I just happened upon this paper which talks about their space applications:

https://arxiv.org/pdf/1709.01787.pdf

In particular, it mentions that thin film peroxide can in theory achieve a specific power of 23 kW per kg for flexible thin film cells in the lab (i.e. an alpha of ~0.05 kg per kW for the solar film). This is much higher than any other kind of cell we've ever talked about in earlier SEP threads, so it's worthy of mention.

(We've had a few SEP threads on here a few years ago. Here's a link to an article in Hop's blog that details the importance of high Alphas for SEP and adds some context, along with some links to previous threads.)
« Last Edit: 02/21/2019 07:42 pm by Nilof »
For a variable Isp spacecraft running at constant power and constant acceleration, the mass ratio is linear in delta-v.   Δv = ve0(MR-1). Or equivalently: Δv = vef PMF. Also, this is energy-optimal for a fixed delta-v and mass ratio.

Offline Nilof

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Re: Space applications of perovskite solar cells
« Reply #1 on: 02/21/2019 07:41 pm »
Also, here's a graph from Ad Astra showing a list of total in-flight times to Mars for a DRM 5.0 sized mission, and curves for what various total system alphas would enable. The Alpha curves only go down to 1 kg per kW.
« Last Edit: 02/21/2019 07:56 pm by Nilof »
For a variable Isp spacecraft running at constant power and constant acceleration, the mass ratio is linear in delta-v.   Δv = ve0(MR-1). Or equivalently: Δv = vef PMF. Also, this is energy-optimal for a fixed delta-v and mass ratio.

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: Space applications of perovskite solar cells
« Reply #2 on: 02/21/2019 11:24 pm »
To summarize the content of that paper, they flew a variety of organic and perovskite solar cells on a 5-hour balloon flight, of which 3 hours was at around 32km.  This was apparently the first time these types of cells were flown in the stratosphere.

For the perovskite cells specifically, it looks like around 28% or so were dead pre-flight, and about 40% of the working ones failed during the 5-hour flight.

Even in terrestrial applications, one of the biggest limitations of current perovskite devices is rapid degradation.  Given that, it is hard to say if the space environment makes it any worse.  Or, as the authors write, "The present results do not offer conclusive evidence that prolonged operation in harsher conditions (as on the surface of the moon or attached to Earth orbiting satellites) will not pose significant stress on such devices."


Offline sanman

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Re: Space applications of perovskite solar cells
« Reply #3 on: 02/24/2019 08:24 pm »
Is perovskite degradation more likely to occur due to radiation, or due to the natural generation of electric current, or due to oxidation by our atmosphere?

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