Author Topic: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon  (Read 8527 times)

Offline mike robel

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #80 on: 03/09/2019 02:32 am »
My wife and I just got back.  It was almost as good as me watching it leave in July of 68.  It also makes me sad.  It has taken us longer to get back to US manned launchers delivering astronauts to space than it did to get to the moon almost from scratch.  We seem to have left our boldness somewhere.

While waiting in the concession line, there was a guy from Space X in front of me.  I congratulated him on recent events and told him you all were doing good work.  It's impressive to see from here.  Not quite a Saturn V but cool.  Especially double stick landings.

Offline gtae07

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #81 on: 03/09/2019 10:51 am »
The nearest showing is 600 miles away   :(

Guess I'll be waiting for the home version...

Online OxCartMark

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #82 on: 03/10/2019 01:11 am »
I had the same reaction. The very brief TLI shot was nothing like this ground-based TLI shot of Apollo 8 from a telescope: https://airandspace.si.edu/sites/default/files/styles/callout_half/public/images/editoral-stories/thumbnails/Apollo%208%20TLI%20-3.jpg?itok=3o2Cv-xN

It was much more detailed and apparently shot from beneath/behind the S-IVB. There was no sign of atmospheric distortion, so it must have been shot from another spacecraft. I don't think it was a recreation as the filmmakers seemed consistent on using only period material.

I don't remember the ground track at TLI, but if it was over Hawaii it's theoretically possible the Air Force ARPA Midcourse Optical Station (which was active then) could have imaged it using large telescopes at over 10,000 ft. However adaptive optics did not exist then so I doubt it was from this source: https://www.darpa.mil/about-us/timeline/amos

There is a similar shot obtained during Apollo 9. Maybe it was that: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-g7kvt6s/0/47324c1e/X3/i-g7kvt6s-X3.jpg

I came across some information on this in a NYT article on this film -

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/08/movies/apollo11-documentary.html

Quote
Miller was focused on keeping the re-creation as to-the-minute as possible. “We did have kind of our own mission rules,” he explained. “We said, if it didn’t happen on that day at that specific time, we’re not using it.”

But he occasionally broke from that purist approach. To show a solar corona phenomenon that the astronauts speak of, Miller said, he used a shot from Apollo 12. During the moments showing the translunar injection maneuver — the propulsive push that sent Apollo 11 toward the moon — Miller used a shot from Apollo 8. He hopes to document these liberties and other aspects of the filmmaking process in a production journal.

-----

later ed/add: Wait, if we're talking about the shot where the 3rd stage moves away from the top of the 2nd with 3 ullage motors and fires its engine when ~200 feet away (is that what you're talking about?) that wouldn't be TLI but rather the first firing of the 3rd stage to finish off getting to orbit.  In that shot that I'm thinking of the camera is clearly in the top of the 2nd stage because you can see the inside of the cylinder (ribs & skin etc.) in the shot.  And the camera would have been ejected for sea recovery.

What I'm thinking of is shown in the first seconds of these: 




ed/add #2:  This story of how TLI was recorded from the ground in Hawaii - https://airandspace.si.edu/stories/editorial/photographing-apollo-8s-orbit-toward-moon
« Last Edit: 03/10/2019 02:21 am by OxCartMark »

Offline Oersted

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #83 on: 03/10/2019 10:07 am »
I must applaud Miller's commitment to stick to genuine Apollo 11 footage except on the rare occasions where he is obliged to use footage from other Apollo missions to show a specific event. So refreshing in today's "anything goes"-environment, where documentarists bend all rules for effect.
« Last Edit: 03/10/2019 10:13 am by Oersted »

Online ehb

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #84 on: 03/10/2019 02:08 pm »
I see at both Smithsonian Air & Space IMAXs https://airandspace.si.edu/theater-type/lockheed-martin-imax-theater and https://airandspace.si.edu/theater-type/airbus-imax-theater they are continuing to show it and in full length.  I hope they continue at least one of them until I get a chance to get to DC later this spring.  I'll extend my visit to make time for this.
« Last Edit: 03/10/2019 02:09 pm by ehb »

Offline joema

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #85 on: 03/10/2019 08:28 pm »
NYT: "During the moments showing the translunar injection maneuver — the propulsive push that sent Apollo 11 toward the moon — Miller used a shot from Apollo 8..."

....later ed/add: Wait, if we're talking about the shot where the 3rd stage moves away from the top of the 2nd with 3 ullage motors and fires its engine when ~200 feet away (is that what you're talking about?) that wouldn't be TLI but rather the first firing of the 3rd stage to finish off getting to orbit....

In the movie it was a very quick shot -- less than 2 sec, maybe 1.5 sec. It was shaking,  unstabilized footage of the S-IVB firing as viewed from below and behind. It looked unlike any of the separation shots from the S-II I've seen. It was very close -- I was actually shocked to see it. Had it not been such a stringent documentary I'd have said it was faked.

It had to be taken from space, as it was very detailed and clear with no atmospheric distortion. The only camera in space to take such a shot was on Apollo 9 where the astronauts photographed the S-IVB re-ignition. The movie version looked roughly like this but more detailed and shaking a lot: https://photos.smugmug.com/photos/i-g7kvt6s/0/47324c1e/X3/i-g7kvt6s-X3.jpg

In the Apollo 9 air/ground transcript, Jim McDivitt estimated they were only 1,000 ft (!!) away from the S-IVB when it ignited. They shot about 10 sec of 16mm film of that process. The shot in the movie must have been this. I don't think there was any other opportunity on any mission. The NYT statement about Apollo 8 must have meant Apollo 9. On Apollo 8 the S-IVB J-2 engine never re-ignited after separation from the CSM.

Online OxCartMark

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #86 on: 03/11/2019 12:27 am »
I don't recall the scene in the movie but I get what you are saying and not what I was pointing to above.

Seems like I recall hearing of someone setting their CSM insanely close behind when it fired and maybe the 1000' you cite is it.  That seems the only possible explanation.

Offline IanO

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #87 on: 03/11/2019 04:39 am »
Just saw it at a local theatre with our rocketry club.  An outstanding documentary!  I'm glad someone pointed out the editing, for it was indeed very well crafted.  This deserves to win all the documentary awards this year.  A true labor of love. I am so, so happy this rare footage was not lost to the ravages of time.
psas.pdx.edu - to orbit with stone knives and bearskins

Offline cebri

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #88 on: 03/11/2019 10:17 am »
Still no news about whether we'll be able to watch it in IMAX here in the EU.  :(

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #89 on: 03/11/2019 09:13 pm »
A note re: 65mm film footage used in Apollo 11:

Be on the look-out for the LC-39 A/B/C "traffic light" that many NSF members love.  It appears early in the film, during the crawler transport to the pad.

(The 39C portion of the sign is cropped out. :(  It was already obsolete by the summer of '69.)
« Last Edit: 03/11/2019 09:14 pm by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline Silmfeanor

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #90 on: 03/14/2019 06:42 pm »
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/14/opinion/apollo-11-documentary-neil-armstrong.html

I thought it appropriate to link this review and opinion piece.

Looking forward to catching a glimpse of this movie when it shows in Europe!

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: New Apollo 11 documentary coming soon
« Reply #91 on: 03/15/2019 08:19 pm »
Brief video about the making of the film:


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