Author Topic: SpaceIL Israeli Moon mission  (Read 64273 times)

Offline mcgyver

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SpaceIL Israeli Moon mission
« on: 01/17/2019 07:22 am »
Quote
First Israeli lunar spacecraft set to land on moon Feb. 13, 2019, making Israel fourth country to do soYEHUD, Israel, July 10 – At a historic press conference today at Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI)’s MBT Space facility in Yehud, Israel, nonprofit SpaceIL and IAI announced a lunar mission to launch [/size]from Cape Canaveral, Fla.,[/size] this December[/size], and [/size]land [/size]on the moon on [/size]Feb. 13, 2019[/size]. A final launch date will be announced closer to the event.
http://www.spaceil.com/news/%D7%99%D7%A9-%D7%9C%D7%A0%D7%95-%D7%9E%D7%95%D7%A2%D7%93-%D7%A9%D7%99%D7%92%D7%95%D7%A8-%D7%95%D7%A0%D7%97%D7%99%D7%AA%D7%94/


But also:
Quote
YEHUD, Dec. 17/2018 – Israeli nonprofit SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) presented today at IAI’s Space Division a time capsule that will travel to the moon — and remain there indefinitely — with the first Israeli spacecraft, which will launch from Cape Canaveral, Florida, in February, 2019[/size].
http://www.spaceil.com/general/spaceil-iai-to-send-time-capsule-on-israels-historic-moon-mission/


Anyway:
Quote
SpaceIL’s spacecraft will be launched on a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida
http://www.spaceil.com/news/%D7%99%D7%A9-%D7%9C%D7%A0%D7%95-%D7%9E%D7%95%D7%A2%D7%93-%D7%A9%D7%99%D7%92%D7%95%D7%A8-%D7%95%D7%A0%D7%97%D7%99%D7%AA%D7%94/


Spacex Forum section:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?board=45.0
« Last Edit: 04/12/2019 07:05 am by input~2 »

Offline redliox

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #1 on: 01/18/2019 07:51 pm »
I am delighted to see Israel attempt a landing on the Moon; a small nation making an achievement after the 3 largest for a change of pace.

Not to make this political, but I have to admit I'm curious how Israel's neighbors will react if they succeed.  Outside of obvious rivalry, the Moon is both a symbol (especially on flags) and definer of the calendar for the Muslim religion.  If you read into Israel's time capsule payload, many of their items are very symbolic, and symbols carry even heavier weight in the Middle East than in the West.  Even Israel's more benign neighbors might be slightly...irked.  I don't expect a titanic impact on culture or an Apollo-esque movement, but I would see this as motivation for the likes of Iran and perhaps the UAE's budding space program.

Otherwise, I am very curious what Israel will do with this mission outside of an impressive technology demonstration.
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Offline TakeOff

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #2 on: 01/18/2019 11:30 pm »
I am delighted to see Israel attempt a landing on the Moon; a small nation making an achievement after the 3 largest for a change of pace.

Not to make this political, but I have to admit I'm curious how Israel's neighbors will react if they succeed.  Outside of obvious rivalry, the Moon is both a symbol (especially on flags) and definer of the calendar for the Muslim religion.  If you read into Israel's time capsule payload, many of their items are very symbolic, and symbols carry even heavier weight in the Middle East than in the West.  Even Israel's more benign neighbors might be slightly...irked.  I don't expect a titanic impact on culture or an Apollo-esque movement, but I would see this as motivation for the likes of Iran and perhaps the UAE's budding space program.

Otherwise, I am very curious what Israel will do with this mission outside of an impressive technology demonstration.
I can't imagine that Israel's neighbors will become unfriendly... :-)


It is not "Israel" that does this. It's a group of guys who are doing this.
« Last Edit: 01/18/2019 11:31 pm by TakeOff »

Offline mcgyver

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #3 on: 01/21/2019 09:03 am »
Not to make this political, but I have to admit I'm curious how Israel's neighbors will react if they succeed.
Rocket science going to turn into politics as in '60s?  :(

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #4 on: 01/21/2019 08:31 pm »
"I am very curious what Israel will do with this mission"

As Takeoff pointed out, this is a private entity, an ex-Google Lunar XPrize team, not the state of Israel.  Their intention was to use the mission to encourage science and engineering eduction in Israel, an 'Apollo moment' of inspiration for the nation and especially its younger people.  More recently there has been a bit of talk about follow-on missions, but that was not part of the plan earlier.  Since UAE already has space plans and even Saudi Arabia has had its little camera on Longjiang 2, the neighbouring states are already doing something, so I doubt if this mission will make much difference to them.   

Offline whitelancer64

Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #5 on: 01/29/2019 03:52 pm »
As I understand it, the SpaceX Falcon 9 second stage will reignite after deployment of the PSN-6 satellite, to boost the SpaceIL lander to the Moon. After that, the lander will use its engines for any course corrections and then landing on the Moon. Is that a correct understanding?

So, all of that is wrong. Per Planetary (link below), all payloads will be deployed from the 2nd stage into GTO (Geostationary Transfer Orbit), and all 3 will be using their own propulsion systems to get to their final orbits. SpaceIL will be boosting itself to a higher apogee until it enters a slow transfer orbit to the Moon. It will take about 2 months for it to get there.

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/spaceil-lander-feature.html
« Last Edit: 01/29/2019 04:20 pm by whitelancer64 »
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Offline mcgyver

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #6 on: 02/05/2019 09:35 am »
Launch scheduled for 18/2/2019.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SpaceIL

« Last Edit: 02/05/2019 09:41 am by mcgyver »

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #7 on: 02/05/2019 06:35 pm »
Despite what I and others said just above this post, I see that the SpaceIL mission is now being very heavily promoted as 'Israel to the Moon'.  It is private, but clearly it is going to be interpreted as a national undertaking (especially if it succeeds) for a variety of inspirational purposes.   

EDIT:  adding an example:

https://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Space-Week-kicks-off-in-Israel-this-week-579340

‘Space Week’ kicks off in Israel this week

By Yafit Ovadia
January 31, 2019

Quoting Science and Technology Minister Ofir Akunis:

“When the spacecraft lands on the moon during Passover, this is going to be one of the highlights of the State of Israel since its establishment. This is a national event,” Akunis said.
« Last Edit: 02/05/2019 10:17 pm by Phil Stooke »

Offline mcgyver

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #8 on: 02/12/2019 07:15 am »
One week to go.


Israel's 1st Moon Lander Arrives in Florida for Launch on a SpaceX Rocket
https://www.space.com/43111-first-israeli-lunar-spacecraft-arrives-florida.html


The Falcon 9 rocket only carries Beresheet about 10 percent of the total distance to the moon. But it provides nearly 90 percent of the total energy required to get there. Consequently, once lifted from the surface of the Earth, and with a small amount of additional energy from its own propulsion system, Beresheet can boost its own orbit by positioning itself so that it’s captured by the moon’s gravitational pull. This process will take several weeks.
https://theconversation.com/first-private-spacecraft-shoots-for-the-moon-109994

« Last Edit: 02/12/2019 07:17 am by mcgyver »

Offline mcgyver

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #9 on: 02/15/2019 07:56 am »
Launch delayed:
2019/02/22 - 01:45 UTC  on Falcon 9 from SLC-40 to supersync GTO.



Official twitter feed:
https://twitter.com/TeamSpaceIL


Lunar X Prize twitter feed (formerly Google Lunar X Prize, now ended):
https://twitter.com/glxp


Launch thread discussion (Beresheet will be launched together with Nusantara Satu (PSN VI) satellite):
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=40516.msg1548829#msg1548829


Launch thread updates:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=47391.msg1909313#msg1909313




Offline mcgyver

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #10 on: 02/20/2019 09:04 am »

Static fire successfully performed on Feb 19th.

Launch still scheduled for 22 February at 01:45 UTC:
Quote
Delay day probability of violating launch weather constraints: 20%
Primary concern(s): Thick Cloud Layer Rule, Cumulus Cloud Rule


Falcon 9 will put payload in 215 x 60,000 kilometers orbit, from which Beresheet will be slowly raised for 40 days until it will get caught by Moon gravity.
Lunar orbit insertion: nominally on 4 April at 14:07 UTC .


Beresheet will then spend 6 days circling the Moon on a  15x197 km orbit.


First  landing opportunity: 11 April at 15:30 UTC


Descent duration: 20 minutes.

Scheduled landing: 11 April at 15:50 UTC; local time: sunrise.


Landing site: Mare Serenitatis



Interactive LROC map centered on landing area:
https://quickmap.lroc.asu.edu/?extent=-0.0481666,25.3732836,35.969841,40.0741203&proj=10&layers=NrBsFYBoAZIRnpEoAsjZwLraeOUNEQ8AOdeTJAZjjivK1zgE4Htsg

Other landing sites:


Onboard camera:
Color,  8-megapixel, Imperx Bobcat B3320C, with Ruda optics.
FOV: 60° x 80°
Resolution: 2488 x 3312 pixels.
Altitude: 15x197 km orbit for 6 days.
During the final descent, Beresheet will shoot video.


LROC Narrow Angle Camera (NAC) currently orbting moon onboard LRO:
FOV: 2.85° x 2.85°
Altitude: 50 km, circular orbit (vs Beresheet perigee: 15 km)
Resolution at 50km: 0.5 m/pixel
Image size: 2.5 x 26 km

Mission duration: 2 or 3 Earth days.
No temperature control. Cameras are only designed to withstand temperatures up to 90°C in storage or 85°C in use; Moon surface temperature can cross 100°C and get lower than -190°C. Daylight on the Moon lasts 14 Earth days, local noon (=highest temperatures) occurs 7 Earth days after sunrise.


Lander was initially designed to take off again at least once after landing, but this possibility has then be discarded to reduce risks.
Mission cost: $100 million.
Source: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/jason-davis/beresheet-what-to-expect.html





« Last Edit: 02/20/2019 09:32 am by mcgyver »

Offline Phil Stooke

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #11 on: 02/20/2019 07:23 pm »
This LPSC abstract:

http://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2019/pdf/2290.pdf

provides more detailed information on the landing site.

Online Blackstar

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #12 on: 02/20/2019 07:35 pm »
Does anybody know how much this mission cost?

Online Comga

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #13 on: 02/20/2019 08:00 pm »
Does anybody know how much this mission cost?

It in the Planetary Society article linked above:
Quote
The mission, which now has a reported price tag of $95 million....

edit:  That number references a article in the Times of Israel.
« Last Edit: 02/20/2019 08:02 pm by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #14 on: 02/22/2019 03:00 pm »
https://twitter.com/teamspaceil/status/1098974934657835009

Quote
Moon Travel Report #1
After the successful launch this morning Beresheet has traveled  69,400 km and is starting its way back to start its first orbit around Earth.

#Israeltothemoon
@ILAerospaceIAI @ILSpaceAgency

Online Comga

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #15 on: 02/22/2019 05:38 pm »
-FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE-
Media contact: Zach Wallens, Puder PR, New York
[email protected]

WORLD’S FIRST PRIVATELY FUNDED LUNAR SPACECRAFT LAUNCHES SUCCESSFULLY ABOARD SPACEX ROCKET

Israeli moon lander Beresheet launched from Cape Canaveral on Thursday at 8:45 p.m. ET

Mission control room in Israel established communication with the spacecraft at 9:23 p.m. ET

Beresheet's legs deployed, as planned, at 9:25 p.m. ET
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla., Feb. 22 – Israeli nonprofit SpaceIL and Israel Aerospace Industries (IAI) today announced that Israel’s inaugural voyage to the moon – the world’s first privately funded lunar mission – launched successfully on Thursday, Feb. 21, at 8:45 pm. ET from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9.

Once Beresheet ("in the beginning") completes its lunar mission, Israel would join superpowers China, Russia and the United States in landing a spacecraft on the moon.

The spacecraft successfully disengaged from the SpaceX Falcon 9 at around 60,000 kilometers above Earth’s surface, beginning, under its own power, a two-month voyage to the Moon’s surface. Beresheet communicated for the first time with the mission’s control center in Yehud, Israel, at 9:23 p.m. ET, and the spacecraft's legs deployed two minutes later.

As of Friday morning, the spacecraft was 69,400 km above Earth, and is starting its way back to begin its first orbit around Earth.

In the meantime, the engineers at the SpaceIL and IAI control room have been conducting many in-orbit tests, and have identified high sensitivity to blinding by the sun’s rays in the star trackers, though this issue is being checked.

On Sunday the spacecraft is expected to conduct its first maneuver around Earth.


Morris Kahn, President of SpaceIL: "The successful launch positions Israel on the map. History has been made. We look forward to an amazing seven-week journey that will mark yet another historic event. We cross our fingers for Beresheet. Thank you to the amazing teams of SpaceIL and IAI. Israel is now on the space map.”

Ido Anteby, CEO of SpaceIL: “We arrived at the launch with a fully tested spacecraft on its way for a highly challenging mission. I am proud of SpaceIL and IAI teams who made this accomplishment possible with professional work, perseverance and collaboration. In the next two months, Beresheet will continue its challenging journey until it lands on the moon.”

Nimrod Sheffer, CEO, Israel Aerospace Industries: "This Friday morning (Israel time), SpaceIL and IAI, the partners in the Beresheet project, announced the successful launch of the spacecraft. Initial data was received in the control room in Yehud, the spacecraft’s legs deployed as planned and Beresheet started in-orbit tests while cruising to the moon. After all sub-systems are tested, Beresheet will start its first maneuver and begin circling the Earth within nine hours."


my emphasis on flight news
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online Comga

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #16 on: 02/22/2019 05:48 pm »
GREAT headline from Eric Berger: "A lunar lander launches from Florida for the first time since Apollo 17"

https://arstechnica.com/science/2019/02/a-lunar-lander-launches-from-florida-for-the-first-time-since-apollo-17/

Quote
What would have seemed crazy in 1972 seems increasingly like the norm today: a private mission to the Moon launched on a reusable rocket.

I would quote the hilarious introduction, but you just have to go over and read it on the original site.
Two thumbs up, Mr. Berger!
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online Blackstar

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #17 on: 02/22/2019 06:39 pm »
Does anybody know how much this mission cost?

It in the Planetary Society article linked above:
Quote
The mission, which now has a reported price tag of $95 million....

edit:  That number references a article in the Times of Israel.

Thanks. NY Times had an article that says $100 million. A lot of it came from a single wealthy donor who took over the project.

Offline Norm38

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Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #18 on: 02/22/2019 06:56 pm »
http://www.spaceil.com/mission/

Can someone skilled in orbital mechanics explain why the orbit raising burns are split up as many as they are?

Maybe I'll answer my own question.  I know that the Oberth effect means burns at perigee are most efficient, and the higher the speed the better.
So if they did the full burn on one orbit, they only get to use the initial speed.  If they split into two burns, the second burn gets the benefit of the speed boost of the 1st burn, correct?  So it's a trade off between fuel efficiency and mission duration (number of orbits)?

Offline Paul_G

Re: Spaceil Israeli Moon mission
« Reply #19 on: 02/22/2019 07:12 pm »
http://www.spaceil.com/mission/

Can someone skilled in orbital mechanics explain why the orbit raising burns are split up as many as they are?

Maybe I'll answer my own question.  I know that the Oberth effect means burns at perigee are most efficient, and the higher the speed the better.
So if they did the full burn on one orbit, they only get to use the initial speed.  If they split into two burns, the second burn gets the benefit of the speed boost of the 1st burn, correct?  So it's a trade off between fuel efficiency and mission duration (number of orbits)?

Kerbal Space Program shows me that the best time to burn is at perigee, but with a relatively small rocket engine you would have to burn a long time either side of the perigee to add the necessary dV, meaning you loose the efficiency. Splitting the burns up would seem to allow you to maximise the efficiency by burning only close to perigee.

Paul

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