Author Topic: Discovery 2019 Competition  (Read 73283 times)

Offline theinternetftw

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #40 on: 04/02/2019 02:03 am »
The final Announcement of Opportunity has been released and is attached.

Preproposal Conference ...............................April 26, 2019 (target)
More info will eventually show up at: http://discovery.larc.nasa.gov/

Electronic Proposal Submittal Deadline Time is 11:59 p.m. Eastern....... July 1, 2019

Step-1 Selections Announced (target) ...............................January 20, 2020
Initiate Phase A Concept Studies (target)...........................February 20, 2020
Phase A Concept Study Reports Due (target)......................November 30, 2020
Down-selection of Investigation(s) for Flight (target)...........April 30, 2021

Launch Readiness Date...............................July 1, 2025, through Dec. 31, 2026
And/or......................................................July 1, 2028, through Dec. 31, 2029

Offline vjkane

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #41 on: 08/03/2019 03:17 pm »
The EPSC-DPS 2019 program reveals a few more Discovery proposals.  I know that at least 19 were proposed; one of my correspondents told me that theirs was number 19 when it was submitted mid afternoon on the due date.

A couple on the list below are not explicitly listed as Discovery proposals in the abstracts, but the descriptions suggest that they might be.

HOVER Venus hyperspectral orbiter - spectral studies from the top of the atmosphere to the surface https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-340-2.pdf

VERITAS Venus geophysical orbiter https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-1124-1.pdf

MAGIC Callisto geophysical mission https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-363-1.pdf

Chimera Centaur flyby https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-1094-1.pdf

FOSSIL - interplanetary and interstellar dust https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-1202-6.pdf

MANTIS - multiple asteroid flybys https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-1277-1.pdf

Io Volcano Observer https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-996-1.pdf

COMPASS Mars climate orbiter https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-912-1.pdf

Trident Triton flyby https://meetingorganizer.copernicus.org/EPSC-DPS2019/EPSC-DPS2019-1850-2.pdf

ISOCHRON lunar sample return https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2019/pdf/1110.pdf

Moon Diver - study a lunar cave https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2019/pdf/1163.pdf

NanoSWARM -  lunar swirls https://www.hou.usra.edu/meetings/lpsc2019/pdf/2786.pdf

DAVINCI Venus atmospheric probe https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjCuejt_ubjAhWyIjQIHWJPDPYQFjACegQIAhAC&url=https%3A%2F%2Fntrs.nasa.gov%2Farchive%2Fnasa%2Fcasi.ntrs.nasa.gov%2F20170002022.pdf&usg=AOvVaw13uAZFZNoQYcPZ-GPHebu_  Link is to the previous competition's proposal.  At the minimum, it has a new PI (Lori Glaze is now head of NASA's Planetary Science Division)

Offline lieder

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #42 on: 08/14/2019 09:28 pm »
Of those I like Io Volcano Observer and Venus geophysical orbiter.  Venus interests me so a hyperspectral orbiter or atmospheric probe would be ok without surface mineralogy.  Yet I keep wondering if Venera-D will happen and include a good atmospheric probe.  Next, studying a lunar cave looks really interesting.  I watched a talk about Moon Diver and lava flows that mentioned the Deccan Traps on earth.  In contrast with exploring a lunar cave I'm not sure what to think of those quick flybys.  Using lunar swirls for space weathering and magnetic field study is looking more and more fascinating to me whereas another climate orbiter at mars holds about as much appeal as the asteroid flybys.  I guess studying interplanetary and interstellar dust looks most interesting before a Triton flyby or a Centaur flyby.

Offline MattMason

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #43 on: 08/15/2019 03:37 pm »
Venus is a decent target for the orbiter proposals, but may not be ambitious enough for the cost. I like the idea of an atmospheric probe, but perhaps it would be more useful first as a balloon with a later drop.

Good luck on any proposal to the outer planets that isn't closer than Saturn and won't stay there. Going to Triton would be more ambitious if it can study both the planet and the moon, which is worthy of more than a flyby.

An Io mission is certainly ambitious and fascinating. But from what I know of Io and Jupiter's high-energy exchange, you'd have to build your probe incredibly, heavily, expensively shielded and hardened for it to survive.

The Moon Diver has much going for it in terms of easier design, science value, cost, ISRU studies, and immediate command and control. Perhaps as well, to its benefit, that the US has never dropped an autonomous lunar rover of any kind before.
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Offline vjkane

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #44 on: 08/15/2019 05:26 pm »

An Io mission is certainly ambitious and fascinating. But from what I know of Io and Jupiter's high-energy exchange, you'd have to build your probe incredibly, heavily, expensively shielded and hardened for it to survive.

IVO uses an inclined orbit relative to Jupiter and just toe dips into Io's orbital space.  The combination limits radiation exposure to much less than Juno and Clipper.

Offline colonize_callisto

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #45 on: 12/16/2019 05:49 am »
Hello, I am an enthusiast from the public (not a scientist) who has been following the Discovery competitions for quite a few years.

The MAGIC proposal to orbit Callisto was one of the missions presented during the P34C - Concepts for Future Planetary Science Missions session at the AGU Fall meeting 2019.
FOSSIL was another of the presented candidates.

But for some reason their official youtube channel hasn't uploaded the video, so I am wondering whether any of you have additional information about MAGIC, an alternative link of the recorded session, or maybe a team member can tell us more about it before we learn whether it is one of the 5 finalists next month. Thank you.

Offline Elthiryel

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #46 on: 02/05/2020 04:50 am »
NASA Discovery 15 and 16 mission finalists were to be announced in January 2020, but they apparently were not. Does anyone have any info on delays or the new announcement date? I was unable to find anything.
GO for launch, GO for age of reflight

Offline PM3

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #47 on: 02/12/2020 08:54 pm »
https://twitter.com/SciGuySpace/status/1227709739523592192
Quote
Announcement coming at 4pm ET Thursday for NASA's Discovery Program down-select.
"Never, never be afraid of the truth." -- Jim Bridenstine

Offline redliox

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #48 on: 02/13/2020 02:10 am »
Rooting for the Venus missions, Trident, and Moon Diver personally.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
-Tigatron

Offline colonize_callisto

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #49 on: 02/13/2020 06:29 am »
Here's someone hoping that all the finalists will target major bodies this time; Venus, Io, Triton, Callisto. These four are the most exciting!

Small bodies were well served on the last competition, on the other hand, they are the most likely to give us clues about solar system's evolution, even if they are not the most PR-friendly targets.

Trident in particular has a very specific launch window, so it would be a shame if it loses. I sadly suspect that Trident, along with Moondiver and the other landers, are the riskiest and most prone to cost overruns.

Lastly, I don't understand why is there so much secrecy about some of the proposals, yet fairly good publicity on others.

Offline vjkane

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #50 on: 02/13/2020 05:41 pm »
I think that if somebody dug around, they could probably come up with a list of maybe 15 of the ~20 proposals.

Here's the list I've collected.  It's a shorter list than the last go around suggesting that either there were fewer proposals or proposers may be more secretive


Concepts with ? have been presented in last year or two, appear to be the right scope for a Discovery mission, but weren't presented as Discovery missions

Asteroids - MANTIS

Centaurs - Centarus, Chiron, SW 1
Centaurs - Chimera SW 1 orbiter

Jupiter, Io - Io Volcano Explorer
Jupiter, Callisto - MAGIC orbiter


Luna - Compass Lunar Rover
Luna - Moon Diver
Luna - ISOCHRON sample return
Luna - Luna Volatile Orbiter ?
Luna - NanoSWARM

Mars - COMPASS climate orbiter
Mars - Ice Breaker polar lander

Neptune, Triton - Trident

Venus - Veritas mapping orbiter
Venus - DaVinci+ atmospheric probe
Venus - HOVER hyperspectrol observer
Venus - Thalassa orbiter explore ocean loss ?


Offline Blackstar

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #51 on: 02/13/2020 08:12 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-selects-four-possible-missions-to-study-the-secrets-of-the-solar-system


Feb. 13, 2020
RELEASE 20-016
NASA Selects Four Possible Missions to Study the Secrets of the Solar System

NASA has selected four Discovery Program investigations to develop concept studies for new missions. Although they’re not official missions yet and some ultimately may not be chosen to move forward, the selections focus on compelling targets and science that are not covered by NASA’s active missions or recent selections. Final selections will be made next year.

NASA’s Discovery Program invites scientists and engineers to assemble a team to design exciting planetary science missions that deepen what we know about the solar system and our place in it. These missions will provide frequent flight opportunities for focused planetary science investigations. The goal of the program is to address pressing questions in planetary science and increase our understanding of our solar system.

“These selected missions have the potential to transform our understanding of some of the solar system’s most active and complex worlds,” said Thomas Zurbuchen, associate administrator of NASA's Science Mission Directorate. “Exploring any one of these celestial bodies will help unlock the secrets of how it, and others like it, came to be in the cosmos.”

Each of the four nine-month studies will receive $3 million to develop and mature concepts and will conclude with a Concept Study Report. After evaluating the concept studies, NASA will continue development of up to two missions towards flight. 

The proposals were chosen based on their potential science value and feasibility of development plans following a competitive peer-review process.

The selected proposals are:

DAVINCI+ (Deep Atmosphere Venus Investigation of Noble gases, Chemistry, and Imaging Plus)
DAVINCI+ will analyze Venus’ atmosphere to understand how it formed, evolved and determine whether Venus ever had an ocean. DAVINCI+ plunges through Venus’ inhospitable atmosphere to precisely measure its composition down to the surface. The instruments are encapsulated within a purpose-built descent sphere to protect them from the intense environment of Venus. The “+” in DAVINCI+ refers to the imaging component of the mission, which includes cameras on the descent sphere and orbiter designed to map surface rock-type. The last U.S.-led, in-situ mission to Venus was in 1978. The results from DAVINCI+ have the potential to reshape our understanding of terrestrial planet formation in our solar system and beyond. James Garvin of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is the principal investigator. Goddard would provide project management.

Io Volcano Observer (IVO)
IVO would explore Jupiter’s moon, Io, to learn how tidal forces shape planetary bodies. Io is heated by the constant crush of Jupiter’s gravity and is the most volcanically active body in the solar system. Little is known about Io’s specific characteristics, such as whether a magma ocean exists in its interior. Using close-in flybys, IVO would assess how magma is generated and erupted on Io. The mission’s results could revolutionize our understanding of the formation and evolution of rocky, terrestrial bodies, as well as icy ocean worlds in our solar system, and extrasolar planets across the universe. Alfred McEwen of the University of Arizona in Tucson is the principal investigator. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland would provide project management.

TRIDENT
Trident would explore Triton, a unique and highly active icy moon of Neptune, to understand pathways to habitable worlds at tremendous distances from the Sun. NASA’s Voyager 2 mission showed that Triton has active resurfacing—generating the second youngest surface in the solar system—with the potential for erupting plumes and an atmosphere. Coupled with an ionosphere that can create organic snow and the potential for an interior ocean, Triton is an exciting exploration target to understand how habitable worlds may develop in our solar system and others. Using a single fly-by, Trident would map Triton, characterize active processes, and determine whether the predicted subsurface ocean exists. Louise Prockter of the Lunar and Planetary Institute/Universities Space Research Association in Houston is the principal investigator. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, would provide project management

VERITAS (Venus Emissivity, Radio Science, InSAR, Topography, and Spectroscopy)
VERITAS would map Venus’ surface to determine the planet’s geologic history and understand why Venus developed so differently than the Earth. Orbiting Venus with a synthetic aperture radar, VERITAS charts surface elevations over nearly the entire planet to create three-dimensional reconstructions of topography and confirm whether processes, such as plate tectonics and volcanism, are still active on Venus. VERITAS would also map infrared emissions from the surface to map Venus’ geology, which is largely unknown. Suzanne Smrekar of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, is the principal investigator. JPL would provide project management.

The concepts were chosen from proposals submitted in 2019 under NASA Announcement of Opportunity (AO) NNH19ZDA010O, Discovery Program. The selected investigations will be managed by the Planetary Missions Program Office at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, as part of the Discovery Program. The Discovery Program conducts space science investigations in the Planetary Science Division of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, guided by NASA’s agency priorities and the Decadal Survey process of the National Academy of Sciences.

Established in 1992, NASA’s Discovery Program has supported the development and implementation of over 20 missions and instruments. These selections are part of the ninth Discovery Program competition.

For more information about NASA’s planetary science, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/solarsystem

-end-
« Last Edit: 02/13/2020 09:36 pm by Blackstar »

Offline Tulse

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #52 on: 02/13/2020 08:39 pm »
The Triton mission sound very cool, and I would be tremendously pleased both to get out to Neptune and to possibly confirm another ocean world, but if it is just a single flyby, I really hope there is more planned before and after the main event.

Offline redliox

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #53 on: 02/13/2020 09:08 pm »
Two to Venus and two to the Outer Planets - very nice choices.  They are both under-visited sectors of the Solar System.  I don't think I'd be able to pick among these 4.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
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Offline Blackstar

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #54 on: 02/14/2020 12:55 am »
My article on Trident appeared in the February issue of Spaceflight.

Offline TorenAltair

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #55 on: 02/14/2020 01:07 am »
I would prefer the Triton mission. We already have quite some data from Venus and Io. Additionally there is Juno cruising inside the Jupiter system and more upcoming missions to the Jupiter system. Neptune and Triton are barely known.
« Last Edit: 02/14/2020 01:08 am by TorenAltair »

Offline redliox

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #56 on: 02/14/2020 02:59 am »
I would prefer the Triton mission. We already have quite some data from Venus and Io. Additionally there is Juno cruising inside the Jupiter system and more upcoming missions to the Jupiter system. Neptune and Triton are barely known.

Triton is the most exotic of the 3 destinations, but all 3 are starved when it comes to fresh data from an American mission.  Venus and Io do get sporadic glances, but not dedicated missions since Magellan and Galileo respectively (and I'm talking American missions, JAXA/ESA excluded).  So all 4 are overdue as both the Venus and Outer Planet assessment groups would unilaterally agree on.
"Let the trails lead where they may, I will follow."
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Offline K-P

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #57 on: 02/14/2020 04:56 am »
The Triton mission sound very cool, and I would be tremendously pleased both to get out to Neptune and to possibly confirm another ocean world, but if it is just a single flyby, I really hope there is more planned before and after the main event.

My thoughts too.

That said, however, I feel there's no wrong choice among these finalists.

If two are chosen, it is difficult to see Venus being left without a mission this time.
Ok. Even if only one is chosen I think it is going to be either Veritas or DaVinci.

Of these four, I think IVO is the least exciting, not only because of the mission itself, but the target Io.
Anyway, Io might get another chance during the next round of New Frontiers...

Trident would be great if there will be no outer planets flagship for decades.
But if there will be some Neptune orbiter coming down the line just some years later,
then I would rather see other missions chosen in this slot.

All in all, great 4 finalists.
Let's hope they choose 2, not just 1.

Offline Star One

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #58 on: 02/14/2020 07:40 am »
I posted this news elsewhere and in the feedback the poor old Venus missions were always listed last. Guess they just can’t compete with what’s seen as the more exotic targets such as Io & Triton.

Offline K-P

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Re: Discovery 2019 Competition
« Reply #59 on: 02/14/2020 11:21 am »
I posted this news elsewhere and in the feedback the poor old Venus missions were always listed last. Guess they just can’t compete with what’s seen as the more exotic targets such as Io & Triton.

Maybe they need to ramp up their plans with some sort of airship mission to Venus?

Would be more interesting to public and also gather much more information than a stationary lander and operate in a totally new environment vs. an orbiter.

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