Author Topic: Chang'e-4 lunar operations  (Read 87914 times)

Offline plutogno

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 801
  • Toulouse, France and Milan, Italy
  • Liked: 137
  • Likes Given: 9
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #320 on: 02/15/2019 05:05 am »

Offline Blackstar

  • Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11645
  • Liked: 3197
  • Likes Given: 1
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #321 on: 02/15/2019 04:44 pm »
I'm rather annoyed by this "race" nonsense.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/economy/nasa-wants-to-get-to-the-moon-as-fast-as-possible-but-countries-like-china-and-india-are-racing-there-too/2019/02/14/d2944b90-2bec-11e9-b2fc-721718903bfc_story.html?fbclid=IwAR23pP-pOsrO4GsFHeel9F45FD3tDTNid52w0biMdilBBqPkngpUUEPsLfs&utm_term=.ea0e63db9093


NASA wants to get to the moon ‘as fast as possible.’ But countries like China and India are racing there, too.
By Christian Davenport
February 14 at 4:57 PM

During the height of the Space Age, the United States and the Soviet Union bushwhacked a frantic path to the lunar surface, landing nearly 20 spacecraft softly on the moon between 1966 and 1976, including the six carrying NASA’s Apollo astronauts.


Offline cro-magnon gramps

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1512
  • Very Ancient Caveman
  • Ontario, Canada
  • Liked: 713
  • Likes Given: 5716
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #322 on: 02/15/2019 06:47 pm »
While I agree with Blackstar in part, because he does talk sense. Don't panic, just we aware. It is also apparent that China has huge aspirations, and is not "bushwhacking" a path to the Moon. There is deep planning going on here. That in itself is sufficient for me to sit up and take notice. Whether like the Soviets, they stumble in the implementation, is still to be seen. But the breadth of their aspirations is worth taking notice of, and not dismissing out of hand. Not that I apply that to anyone, just a mild warning for the future. There is going to need to be HUGE investment in economic output, newly developed technology and delivery to the Lunar surface for this radio telescope base to come into being. This is on a scale that we haven't seen in decades, if then. It will be interesting to monitor further developments, elsewhere on the Moon. Gramps.
I took the screen shot from this video.

PS I had a flashback to the Sputnik, when I first saw the positioning of the sites in the Lunar craters. Totally unexpected. So not a race. Just showing aspirations.
"Hate, it has caused a lot of problems in the world, but it has not solved one yet." Maya Angelou
 Tony Benn: "Hope is the fuel of progress and fear is the prison in which you put yourself."

Offline zandr

  • Member
  • Posts: 79
  • Russia
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 40
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #323 on: 02/15/2019 08:28 pm »
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-02/15/c_137824960_3.htm
Quote
Chang'e-4 landing site named "Statio Tianhe"




Photo provided by the China National Space Administration (CNSA) shows the image of Mons Tai, a hill near "Statio Tianhe", the landing site of China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe. The landing site of China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe has been named "Statio Tianhe" after the spacecraft made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon last month. Together with three nearby impact craters and one hill, the name was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), Liu Jizhong, director of the China Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), said at a joint press conference held in Beijing Friday. "Tianhe" is the Chinese word for Milky Way and "Statio" is Latin for base. Three craters were given the names Zhinyu, Hegu and Tianjin, three constellations of the twenty-eight mansions in traditional Chinese astrology. The hill used to locate the three craters is named Mons Tai after Mount Tai, a Chinese mountain of historical and cultural significance. The press conference was jointly held by the CNSA, the Chinese Academy of Sciences and the IAU. According to the CNSA, the Chang'e-4 lunar probe made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3. (Xinhua/CNSA)

BEIJING, Feb. 15 (Xinhua) -- The landing site of China's Chang'e-4 lunar probe has been named "Statio Tianhe" after the spacecraft made the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon last month.
Together with three nearby impact craters and one hill, the name was approved by the International Astronomical Union (IAU), Liu Jizhong, director of the China Lunar Exploration and Space Engineering Center of the China National Space Administration (CNSA), said at a joint press conference...

Offline zandr

  • Member
  • Posts: 79
  • Russia
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 40
« Last Edit: 02/15/2019 08:47 pm by zandr »

Offline zubenelgenubi

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2174
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Liked: 619
  • Likes Given: 2505
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #325 on: 02/15/2019 08:58 pm »
http://www.xinhuanet.com/english/2019-02/15/c_137824960_3.htm
Quote
Chang'e-4 landing site named "Statio Tianhe"
<snip>
Are the accompanying images LROC imagery?
« Last Edit: 02/15/2019 08:58 pm by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

Offline clongton

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10718
  • Connecticut
    • Direct Launcher
  • Liked: 2940
  • Likes Given: 1190
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #326 on: 02/15/2019 09:19 pm »
I'm rather annoyed by this "race" nonsense.

I agree. As China is learning, and India will ultimately learn, getting to and landing on the moon with mission spacecraft that are worth the effort is very expensive and very hard. We landed crews on the lunar surface 6 times. And then, to our shame, we never went back. For decades after that I never understood the reasons why. It wasn't until I entered politics that I finally knew. Going to the moon then had nothing to do with exploring new frontiers. It had everything to do with politics. Apollo had 1 objective and 1 objective only - beat the Soviets to the moon. On July 20, 1969, we did that, and shamefully, for all intents and purposes, the program ended on that day. It took a few years for the momentum to die down, but it ended on that day.

I am very anxious for US crews to return to the lunar surface. But the very last thing we need to do is spend billions of dollars in political stunts and once again be heartbroken by broken dreams and wasted human and national treasure in stupid political stunts. Apollo had meaning. Apollo had purpose. And it accomplished its mission. But millions of us didn't understand at the time why we quit. Now I do, and I don't want to see us make the mistake of expending huge efforts in misguided efforts to beat others there. That's not a good reason to return.

We should go back to the moon, but only as part of a very long term effort to settle as much of the solar system as we reasonably can, in reachable places, that actually advance the cause of making humanity a space-faring species. We need to explore, learn, theorize, create spacecraft that test those theories, and repeat the process over and over again, reaching ever further into our home system, on a schedule that is based on reality, not on misguided national ego to be king of the hill. No more "races". That's really dumb. Yes, let's do this again, but let's do it this time for real, with long term commitment and sustainability. I too get really annoyed by this "race" nonsense.
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline chetan_chpd

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 113
  • Pune
  • Liked: 22
  • Likes Given: 25

Offline Steven Pietrobon

  • Member
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 19076
  • Adelaide, Australia
    • Steven Pietrobon's Space Archive
  • Liked: 6971
  • Likes Given: 958
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #328 on: 02/16/2019 04:04 am »
I'm rather annoyed by this "race" nonsense.

I agree, there is no race as anyone who watches China's glacial pace of progress can see, but "China going slowly to the Moon" does not grab the headlines!
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Phillip Clark

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2499
  • Hastings, England
  • Liked: 474
  • Likes Given: 998
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #329 on: 02/16/2019 06:57 am »
The Chinese are not "racing" anyone to the Moon or anywhere else.   They have their plans, influenced in part by local politics, and they keep to those plans irrespective of what others might be doing.

On the other hand, it might appear that India is "racing" against China in some areas.
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Offline Star One

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10212
  • UK
  • Liked: 2036
  • Likes Given: 208
Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #330 on: 02/16/2019 07:53 am »
The Chinese are not "racing" anyone to the Moon or anywhere else.   They have their plans, influenced in part by local politics, and they keep to those plans irrespective of what others might be doing.

On the other hand, it might appear that India is "racing" against China in some areas.

Or vice versa on the last point.

Can’t believe people are getting so bent out of shape by one word that media like attaching to lots of things in science and technology. The race to the first quantum computer, the race to the first fusion generator etc etc that I personally don’t take much notice of it now. Maybe it’s also because I don’t have the same direct emotional attachment to Apollo as others obviously do as because of my age it has always been a historical event.
« Last Edit: 02/16/2019 08:07 am by Star One »

Offline clongton

  • Expert
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10718
  • Connecticut
    • Direct Launcher
  • Liked: 2940
  • Likes Given: 1190
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #331 on: 02/16/2019 11:15 pm »
The Chinese are not "racing" anyone to the Moon or anywhere else.

Comments above were in response to the quoted Washington Post article that spoke of "NASA's" attitude.
Chuck - DIRECT co-founder
I started my career on the Saturn-V F-1A engine

Offline PM3

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 211
  • Germany
  • Liked: 208
  • Likes Given: 118
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #332 on: 02/16/2019 11:58 pm »
"Game on! Races are interesting!" -- Elon Musk @ Dear Moon

scnr ;)
« Last Edit: 02/16/2019 11:58 pm by PM3 »

Offline mcgyver

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 629
  • milan, rome
  • Liked: 175
  • Likes Given: 131
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #333 on: 02/19/2019 06:13 am »
[/size]Interactive zoomable LROC images:Pre-landing: http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1084 -   NAC M134022629LR (too short ID?) http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1087[/size] -   NAC M1298916428LR Aafter landing:http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1090  (Jan 30) - NAC M1303521387LRhttp://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1091  (Jan 31) - NAC M1303570617LR[/size]


New image:
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/posts/1092 (Feb 1) - NAC M1303619844LR


Interactive map:
https://quickmap.lroc.asu.edu/projections?extent=177.5739652,-45.4662978,177.6040295,-45.4477037&proj=7&layers=NrBsFYBoAZIRnpEoAsjZwLraeOVYMlg8BOdebbIA


Decrease zoom and click on satellite icon on top-right corner to see LRO position in orbit.
Click on lat/lon in low part of the screen to manually specify center location of image. Click on zoom number (expressed in m/px) to change it manually.

Official landing site coordinates: Latitude -45.457° N, Longitude 177.589° E

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Germany
  • Liked: 670
  • Likes Given: 250

Offline Phil Stooke

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 561
  • Canada
  • Liked: 372
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #335 on: 02/27/2019 08:29 pm »
http://www.9ifly.cn/thread-5819-98-1.html

This links to a page of posts on the chinese 9ifly forum which contains a map of the Yutu 2 traverse so far.  I am trying to ascertain its origin - any advice from chinese speakers much appreciated!


Offline nonothing

  • Member
  • Posts: 2
  • Oxford, UK
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #336 on: 02/27/2019 10:03 pm »
http://www.9ifly.cn/thread-5819-98-1.html

This links to a page of posts on the chinese 9ifly forum which contains a map of the Yutu 2 traverse so far.  I am trying to ascertain its origin - any advice from chinese speakers much appreciated!
Hi, Phil

It looks like it's taken from this web page:
https://k.sina.cn/article_6180132521_p1705d56a900100eogu.html?wm=3049_0016&from=qudao&http=fromhttp

But that page doesn't provide the ultimate source.

The Chinese on the image reads:
Yutu 2 went into hibernation again at 20.00 on 11th February. It has travelled 120m so far.

Offline nonothing

  • Member
  • Posts: 2
  • Oxford, UK
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #337 on: 02/27/2019 10:19 pm »
The above article was written today. The same author seemingly wrote another post on 7th February with an image showing the traverse at that time. Here's the link:

http://k.sina.com.cn/article_6180132521_1705d56a900100e61h.html

Online Olaf

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1997
  • Germany
  • Liked: 670
  • Likes Given: 250

Offline wahaha

  • Member
  • Posts: 34
  • Liked: 18
  • Likes Given: 7
Re: Chang'e-4 lunar operations
« Reply #339 on: 02/28/2019 10:23 pm »

Tags: