Author Topic: The Hill Interview with Jim Bridenstine - Return to the Moon  (Read 1985 times)

Online Eric Hedman

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Offline Zed_Noir

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The video clip doesn't really mention anything specific about a manned Moon lander. Which don't seems to have a budgetary line as along as NASA is developing the SLS, Orion & LOP-G in parallel. The takeaway from the clip is that it will be a long time before someone step off a NASA Moon lander on the Moon with the current plan of record.

Offline QuantumG

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The video clip doesn't really mention anything specific

The press conference didn't either.

Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Offline ncb1397

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You should watch the full segment for context:

https://thehill.com/hilltv/rising/418845-rising-november-29-2018

Just click on the 4th video.

Offline Hop_David

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You should watch the full segment for context:

https://thehill.com/hilltv/rising/418845-rising-november-29-2018

Just click on the 4th video.

Bridenstine states as fact we discovered hundreds of billions of tonnes of rocket fuel on the moon. While I think Spudis' estimates are exciting they shouldn't be regarded as indisputable truth. The LRO LEND data doesn't support Spudis' estimates.

The lunar poles are well worth checking out. But we shouldn't count our chickens before they're hatched.

Offline DougSpace

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Bridenstine only says that the Gateway will be up and running in ten years with someone’s crewed lander (paid for somehow) departing the Gateway and landing on the surface of the Moon at some point in time after that.  It’s the journalists who take all of this uncertainty and somehow write that Bridenstine is stating that NASA will have a permanent presence on the surface of the Moon in ten years.  And then apparently NASA does nothing to correct the misreporting.

Compare this low level of accomplishment with what could happen if we were to have a full-scale (e.g. 5-7% of NASA’s budget) public-private program to fund a human-scale (rateable) lunar lander such as XEUS/ACES for only about $200 M and in far less than 10 years.

Offline QuantumG

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Science reporting is like that. "We spoke to this expert and here's what he said" is a story. If you're lucky, they'll take the story to some other experts and say "is this true?" and quote the experts who agree, discarding any experts who don't with "opinions differ". Very rarely do you get an actual journalist to report science, they dig into the disagreements in the field, get confused/bored and report the crackpots as the most interesting thing they've ever heard. The public loves it, but it poisons the journalist's reputation with the experts. So do experts just want to be reported and confirmed? No. Experts are happy to be contradicted in good faith. Facilitate a conversation between journalists and the experts and we'll get better reporting - but it's not low effort, and that's really what is being required by mainstream publications these days. We have a few great space journalists. Jeff Foust, Eric Berger, etc. We should celebrate them.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Online JonathanD

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The only permanent presence on the moon in 10 years will be discarded descent stages from the "sustainable" lunar lander architecture.

Online Coastal Ron

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Bridenstine only says that the Gateway will be up and running in ten years with someone’s crewed lander (paid for somehow) departing the Gateway and landing on the surface of the Moon at some point in time after that.

...

Compare this low level of accomplishment with what could happen if we were to have a full-scale (e.g. 5-7% of NASA’s budget) public-private program to fund a human-scale (rateable) lunar lander such as XEUS/ACES for only about $200 M and in far less than 10 years.

Even with their experiences from Commercial Cargo and Commercial Crew, NASA is still not set up to allow a human-rated lunar lander to be built, tested, and deployed operationally 10 years after program funding from Congress.

Commercial Crew will likely have taken 9 years, and the NASA-specific Orion spacecraft will have taken 18 years, until the spacecraft are operational. And Commercial Crew is a much easier vehicle than a human-rated lunar lander. Plus there needs to be a lot of infrastructure put in place before the first flight, and that will take time too.

Part of the job of the NASA Administrator is to talk about what is possible, though not necessarily probable. And I think that is the case here, where Bridenstine likely knows it's HIGHLY improbable that such an effort would be funded by Congress anytime soon.
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Online ThereIWas3

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Meanwhile in a recent interview on NPR's "Marketplace" program, Gwynne Shotwell was asked what will SpaceX be doing in those same 10 years.  Her answer was "regular flights taking people back and forth to Mars".  She seemed pretty confident about it.
« Last Edit: 12/16/2018 04:19 pm by ThereIWas3 »
"If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea" - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Offline freddo411

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Meanwhile in a recent interview on NPR's "Marketplace" program, Gwynne Shotwell was asked what will SpaceX be doing in those same 10 years.  Her answer was "regular flights taking people back and forth to Mars".  She seemed pretty confident about it.

"80 percent of success is just showing up" —Woody Allen

Looks like NASA is not headed for success.

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