Author Topic: Surplus F/A-18Bs Begin Arriving At Armstrong Flight Test Center  (Read 2476 times)

Offline Star One

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The bit I found most interesting in this article is the fact that the may end up only adding one of these aircraft to their active fleet. I’d of thought with the age of the existing that just be like for like replacements. Have NASA always replaces their research aircraft like this?

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/25132/navys-trash-is-nasas-treasure-as-surplus-f-a-18bs-begin-arriving-at-armstrong-flight-test-center

Offline Rocket Science

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Yes many times...
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator, Vintage auto racer

Online russianhalo117

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Article is slightly off as some F/A-18B's are being rebuilt as an upgrade programme to primarily ship to allies.

Offline Star One

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Is the F/A-18 now the most numerous type in their research fleet?
« Last Edit: 11/27/2018 04:32 PM by Star One »

Online russianhalo117

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Is the F/A-18 now the most numerous type in their research fleet?
F-15E but could surpass it in the coming years.

Offline Hog

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Is the F/A-18 now the most numerous type in their research fleet?
F-15E but could surpass it in the coming years.
I'm seeing 213 F-15E in use with the USAF, but zero for NASA(as of 2014)
F-15 #835 to test Highly Integrated Digital Engine Control system (HIDEC) in 1988
2 F-15D models N884NA & N897NA
 F-15 STOL/MTD (Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator) pre-production TF-15A (F-15B) No. 1 (USAF S/N 71-0290), the first two-seat F-15 Eagle built by McDonnell Douglas (out of 2 prototypes), the sixth F-15 off the assembly line, and was the oldest F-15 flying up to its retirement. It was also used as the avionics testbed for the F-15E Strike Eagle program. The plane was on loan to NASA from the United States Air Force.  This same A/C would become the ACTIVE Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles from 1993–1999, and later in the Intelligent Flight Control System programs from 1999 to 2008.
"While with NASA, the aircraft's tail number was 837; for the Quiet Spike program and Research Testbed it was 836, and 835 was used for the Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) program."

NASA's Armstrong Flight Test Center lists 4 F/A-18s  (The aircraft were obtained from the U.S. Navy between 1984 and 1991. One has a two-seat cockpit while the others are single-seat aircraft.-2015) N843NA, N846NA,
& N850NA)

I know the question was referencing Research a/c, but I'm seeing:
20 T-38
3 WB-57
3 F-15
3 F-18
3 G-III
and 3 rotary UH-1H

The lists I'm finding are dated or incomplete. Any source suggestions?

pics
1) NASA F-18-B
2) NASA F-15 ACTIVE
3)NASA ER-2 (U-2 derivative)
4)NASA WB-57 fleet with pilots in pressure suits
Paul

Offline Rocket Science

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Offline Star One

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Thanks both of you for that information.

Offline JAFO

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I remember going to an open house at Eddy a long time ago and seeing a winged pig and the words “Silk purse” painted on the NASA F-18 on display, I asked the rep about it and they said it was because their techs had taken a pig of a worn out airplane and made it into a good flying jet.
« Last Edit: 11/27/2018 09:33 PM by JAFO »
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Online Blackstar

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Back in 2011 I took my NASA flight research committee out to Dryden. They had just received three F-15s from the Air Force. I think these were D models. They also had a bunch of F-18s, some of them undergoing maintenance, others out on their boneyard line. They had a few of them that they used almost exclusively as chase aircraft and did not put instruments on them. (Oh, the guy in the white jacket is Neil Armstrong. He was on my committee.)

Offline deruch

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Is the F/A-18 now the most numerous type in their research fleet?
F-15E but could surpass it in the coming years.
I'm seeing 213 F-15E in use with the USAF, but zero for NASA(as of 2014)
F-15 #835 to test Highly Integrated Digital Engine Control system (HIDEC) in 1988
2 F-15D models N884NA & N897NA
 F-15 STOL/MTD (Short Takeoff and Landing/Maneuver Technology Demonstrator) pre-production TF-15A (F-15B) No. 1 (USAF S/N 71-0290), the first two-seat F-15 Eagle built by McDonnell Douglas (out of 2 prototypes), the sixth F-15 off the assembly line, and was the oldest F-15 flying up to its retirement. It was also used as the avionics testbed for the F-15E Strike Eagle program. The plane was on loan to NASA from the United States Air Force.  This same A/C would become the ACTIVE Advanced Control Technology for Integrated Vehicles from 1993–1999, and later in the Intelligent Flight Control System programs from 1999 to 2008.
"While with NASA, the aircraft's tail number was 837; for the Quiet Spike program and Research Testbed it was 836, and 835 was used for the Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) program."

NASA's Armstrong Flight Test Center lists 4 F/A-18s  (The aircraft were obtained from the U.S. Navy between 1984 and 1991. One has a two-seat cockpit while the others are single-seat aircraft.-2015) N843NA, N846NA,
& N850NA)

I know the question was referencing Research a/c, but I'm seeing:
20 T-38
3 WB-57
3 F-15
3 F-18
3 G-III
and 3 rotary UH-1H

The lists I'm finding are dated or incomplete. Any source suggestions?

pics
1) NASA F-18-B
2) NASA F-15 ACTIVE
3)NASA ER-2 (U-2 derivative)
4)NASA WB-57 fleet with pilots in pressure suits

So, on the list of the world's air forces where does NASA rank?
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online Blackstar

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I know the question was referencing Research a/c, but I'm seeing:
20 T-38
3 WB-57
3 F-15
3 F-18
3 G-III
and 3 rotary UH-1H

The lists I'm finding are dated or incomplete. Any source suggestions?

You're missing a bunch. NASA also has SOFIA and a DC-8 and a P-3. Also the Super Guppy. They may have retired their S-3 by now.

Also, I don't think all those T-38s are active. I seem to remember that they keep about a third of them in non-flying storage.

« Last Edit: 11/28/2018 11:52 AM by Blackstar »

Offline gongora

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So, on the list of the world's air forces where does NASA rank?

They appear to be behind most of the private companies gearing up to compete for the USAF/USN Red Air training contracts.

Offline Thorny

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Also, I don't think all those T-38s are active. I seem to remember that they keep about a third of them in non-flying storage.

Any word if NASA be replacing the T-38s with the new TX trainer once it enters service?

Online Blackstar

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Also, I don't think all those T-38s are active. I seem to remember that they keep about a third of them in non-flying storage.

Any word if NASA be replacing the T-38s with the new TX trainer once it enters service?

I have no insight on that at all, but it strikes me as way too premature to make a decision like that. I would suspect that a few years after they enter USAF service Boeing will offer a stripped down version to NASA. NASA does not need all those capabilities, they only need to replace an old airframe.

Offline Hog

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I know the question was referencing Research a/c, but I'm seeing:
20 T-38
3 WB-57
3 F-15
3 F-18
3 G-III
and 3 rotary UH-1H

The lists I'm finding are dated or incomplete. Any source suggestions?

You're missing a bunch. NASA also has SOFIA and a DC-8 and a P-3. Also the Super Guppy. They may have retired their S-3 by now.

Also, I don't think all those T-38s are active. I seem to remember that they keep about a third of them in non-flying storage.
Wasn't meant to be inclusive.  There's the RQ-4s, C-9, C-130, P-3,757, etc etc

Pics
1) NASA 930 KC-135-A
2) NASA DC-9
Paul

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