Author Topic: Ion Drive work from MIT.  (Read 1214 times)

Offline Mulletron

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Ion Drive work from MIT.
« on: 11/21/2018 08:59 pm »
I found this today. I wanted to share it. The video speaks for itself. They're focusing on atmospheric flight. The reason I shared this is because I I had an idea during watching the video where it may be possible to use the same concept for attitude control, by placing an electrode above and below the ion stream, which would be useful for spaceflight. We already have ion drives in space, but I'm unaware of a means of attitude control using the same idea.

And I can feel the change in the wind right now - Rod Stewart

Offline Mulletron

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #1 on: 11/21/2018 09:11 pm »
I understand this thought experiment sounds very basic; I'm using my imagination. Imagine you have two friends, yourself, and a beach ball. Friend A is to your left, friend B is to your right, you're in the middle and just outside their line of sight. Friend A accelerates the ball towards friend B. When the ball passes in front of you, you push on the ball and you get a push back. I don't immediately see an immediate way to gain linear momentum from this, but I think you could get a rotation from the interaction.
And I can feel the change in the wind right now - Rod Stewart

Offline RotoSequence

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #2 on: 11/21/2018 09:59 pm »
I think this one actually belongs in Advanced Concepts, since it doesn't involve any revisions to known physics.  ;D

Offline sanman

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #3 on: 11/22/2018 06:18 am »
But plasma aerodynamics / electroaerodynamics is a known field with active R&D.

For example, NASA has been researching weakly ionized atmospheric gas / cold plasma for aerodynamic benefits.

Offline QuantumG

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #4 on: 11/22/2018 06:24 am »
Yeah, ion-wind is a well known effect, along with corona discharge. What this team has done is tweaks that should improve the known efficiency of such engines at higher altitudes.
Human spaceflight is basically just LARPing now.

Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #5 on: 11/22/2018 06:01 pm »
I understand this thought experiment sounds very basic; I'm using my imagination. Imagine you have two friends, yourself, and a beach ball. Friend A is to your left, friend B is to your right, you're in the middle and just outside their line of sight. Friend A accelerates the ball towards friend B. When the ball passes in front of you, you push on the ball and you get a push back. I don't immediately see an immediate way to gain linear momentum from this, but I think you could get a rotation from the interaction.

A similar drive is investigated by Electrofluidsystems
http://www.electrofluidsystems.com/
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Berkant_Goeksel

Offline Star One

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #6 on: 11/22/2018 10:21 pm »
And a related article on the technicalities and possible future.

https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-07411-z

Offline meberbs

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #7 on: 11/24/2018 06:39 am »
Topic has been duplicated in advanced topics section which is where it belongs anyway.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=46853.0

Offline Star One

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Re: Ion Drive work from MIT.
« Reply #8 on: 11/24/2018 08:35 am »
Topic has been duplicated in advanced topics section which is where it belongs anyway.

https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=46853.0

Have you reported this to the mods so it can be sorted out?

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