Author Topic: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents  (Read 3139 times)

Offline ThereIWas3

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #20 on: 11/22/2018 12:58 pm »
Maintaining the proper group dynamics is the responsibility of everyone.  You can not make one person responsible for it.   Japanese society works in such crowded conditions because everybody participates it and knows the rules of correct behavior.    Though there are some who completely withdraw and literally live in one room, called the hikikomori.

In the "Red Mars" trilogy, Michel, the psychologist in the initial crew, was one of the people who could not deal with living on Mars and had to return to Earth.
"If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea" - Antoine de Saint-Exupéry

Offline DaveJes1979

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #21 on: 12/03/2018 05:40 pm »
Any Mars settlement is almost certainly going to have a small ratio of females.  This disproportion, itself, will be the source of tension and problems as the months tick by. 

In insular environments, venereal diseases also tend to be a problem.

Online spacenut

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #22 on: 12/03/2018 07:29 pm »
What do they do in Antarctica?  Snow everywhere through the long cold winters?  Seems like Mars will have a lot more work to do to keep people busy and occupied to avoid boredom. 
« Last Edit: 12/03/2018 10:41 pm by spacenut »

Offline Slarty1080

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #23 on: 12/06/2018 03:51 pm »
Any Mars settlement is almost certainly going to have a small ratio of females.  This disproportion, itself, will be the source of tension and problems as the months tick by. 

In insular environments, venereal diseases also tend to be a problem.
I don't see why there should be fewer females or any problem with venereal diseases. Initially at least and probably for a very long time, there will be far more people who want to go to Mars than there is room for so people will be selected by some sort of committee. It is hard to see them selecting all men (or all women) in this day and age. In addition, before anyone flew they would be subject to an intense medical. Every attempt would be made to prevent contaminating the Mars colony with unwanted pathogens, venereal diseases included. Even if there were an outbreak, once it was identified it would be relatively easy to track down who had it and give them antibiotics as the colony would be relatively small for a long time.
The first words spoken on Mars: "Humans have been wondering if there was any life on the planet Mars for many decades … well ... there is now!"

Online Eric Hedman

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #24 on: 12/06/2018 04:07 pm »
Any Mars settlement is almost certainly going to have a small ratio of females.  This disproportion, itself, will be the source of tension and problems as the months tick by.
Why would a Mars settlement "almost certainly" have a small ratio of females?  I know there are more men than women in STEM fields, but there should still be a fairly large pool of highly qualified women to draw from for going to Mars.  Part of the selection criteria may be what keeps a more stable social environment.  Gender balance may be important in maintaining that, so why not?

Online Eric Hedman

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #25 on: 12/13/2018 02:08 pm »
I am adding this here because it probably doesn't need a new thread.  Two technicians died in Antarctica who had been working on a fire suppression system.  I can imagine this is also the kind of risk a lunar or Mars outpost can have that could add to the stress:

https://apnews.com/9ed2dc90892944459f2268b0c0a5eba5

Offline Elvis in Space

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Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #26 on: 12/13/2018 04:54 pm »
My father was a Chief Petty Officer in the United States Navy. He was a fervent believer in the adage that "idle hands are the devil's workshop" and handled both me and his sailors accordingly. He was fond of pointing out that all of the endless manual tasks on a ship from incessant chipping and painting to peeling potatoes were important not only for the obvious reasons but it kept sailors busy. "Too busy to get into trouble" was another mantra of his. At the time I didn't understand that this was also a reason he insisted on me and my siblings always being on sports teams or otherwise involved with something. I have to admit it was a successful strategy.

When a cousin of mine joined the USN and became a nuclear machinists mate on strategic missile subs I was amazed at how he would remain sane being underwater in a confined space with 140 guys for 2 or 3 months. My cousin was a very reserved sort but he was only human. This was when my father explained a great deal about being busy to me but he also pointed out that my cousin would have the additional distraction of "the mission". His was a job where every hour was just as important as any other and that focus was a big part of not losing your mind no matter what your personality was like. Time doesn't mean as much when you have a goal. Personal behavior doesn't affect things as greatly when you have to rely on the guy next to you to stay alive. "The mission" was what made many days in his Navy more than "just a boat trip."
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Online whitelancer64

Re: Mental Health of isolated outpost residents
« Reply #27 on: 12/13/2018 05:09 pm »
About a thousand people have wintered over In Antarctica every year in the 70 since the IGY.  There have been a handful of incidents, during that time (perhaps 4-5), including a suspicious death at the US south pole station.  Compared to other risks it is not to be ignored but it is very small.

This. It is worth noting that such violence is quite rare. TV shows about space missions will dramatize inter-personal conflicts it for ratings, but it's not likely to be a big factor on actual missions. As far as I know there have been nothing even close to such incidents on the ISS.

All crewmembers should be very thoroughly trained in de-escalation of conflicts.
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