Author Topic: China's Space Moon  (Read 1163 times)

Offline ulm_atms

  • Rocket Junky
  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 160
  • To boldly go where no government has gone before.
  • Calhoun, LA
  • Liked: 146
  • Likes Given: 59
China's Space Moon
« on: 10/17/2018 09:03 PM »
http://en.cifnews.com/chengdu-launches-artificial-moon-satellite-orbit-2020/

I didn't see anything about it on here, so delete or move if necessary.

With the small reflector that was sent up on the Electron launch (Humanity Star) and the discussions that entailed....If this flies, I think everyone will forget about the Humanity Star.

Offline Danderman

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9638
  • Liked: 367
  • Likes Given: 464
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #1 on: 10/19/2018 11:59 PM »
This appears to be a garbled story. Clearly, the concept as described is not viable.

Offline AndyH

  • Member
  • Posts: 21
  • San Antonio, TX
  • Liked: 27
  • Likes Given: 532
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #2 on: 10/20/2018 12:15 AM »
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/china-to-launch-worlds-first-artificial-moon-over-city-to-light-up-night-sky/
Quote
The object has a planned orbit of about 310 miles above Earth...

It could replace some streetlights in Chengdu, which will help conserve energy, but it won't light up the entire night sky.

The location and brightness of the "moonbeams" can be controlled and targeted to light up specific areas, the news outlet reported.

Live Science reports that little is known about the height, size and true brightness of the proposed artificial moon all of which could affect its visibility.

If the launch of this moon is successful, three more could follow in 2022, Wu told China Daily. Wu estimated the city of Chengdu could save around $174 million (1.2 billion yuan) in electricity ever year if the artificial moon illuminated 31 square miles of the city. Artificial moonlight could also serve other purposes, he suggested, like illuminating disaster zones during blackouts.

Online Phillip Clark

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2398
  • Hastings, England
  • Liked: 416
  • Likes Given: 912
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #3 on: 10/20/2018 12:24 AM »
Am I the only person who is reminded of the Russian Znamya-2 (Progress-M 15, 1992) and Znamya-2.5 (Progress-M 40, 1998) experiments?
« Last Edit: 10/20/2018 12:32 AM by Phillip Clark »
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Online Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 799
  • Germany
  • Liked: 164
  • Likes Given: 325
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #4 on: 10/20/2018 03:31 PM »
Am I the only person who is reminded of the Russian Znamya-2 (Progress-M 15, 1992) and Znamya-2.5 (Progress-M 40, 1998) experiments?
I'm sorry, not the only one  ;)

Offline flyright

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 147
  • Denver, Colorado
  • Liked: 159
  • Likes Given: 321
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #5 on: 10/20/2018 04:03 PM »
310 miles up? Might provide a few minutes of light every now and then.

Offline Lar

  • Fan boy at large
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 10749
  • Saw Gemini live on TV
  • A large LEGO storage facility ... in Michigan
  • Liked: 7644
  • Likes Given: 5478
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #6 on: 10/20/2018 04:32 PM »
310 miles up? Might provide a few minutes of light every now and then.

Maybe it would rotate to have the beam over one place but even then, not a very high duty cycle. I would think something in geosynch would be better suited? This makes zero sense to me.
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline SciNews

  • Full Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 334
  • Romania
  • Liked: 311
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: China's Space Moon
« Reply #7 on: 10/20/2018 04:50 PM »
China Daily exclusive interview with Wu Chunfeng
http://europe.chinadaily.com.cn/a/201810/19/WS5bc922f3a310eff303283431.html
Quote
However, Wu stressed that much work still needs to be done, both in terms of scientific feasibility and business models, to tap into the full potential of China's artificial moons.
Looks more like a publicity stunt than an actual plan. The story was not picked up by Xinhua.

Tags: