Author Topic: "Shuttle Sunday"  (Read 948 times)

Offline litton4

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"Shuttle Sunday"
« on: 09/24/2018 03:25 PM »
Apologies if this is the wrong location, but I dodn't want to pollute the Shuttle sections with stupid questions.

In all the time I've been on this site, I've never seen an explanation of "Shuttle Sunday"

I see Chris bump threads often enough for Shuttle Sunday (the STS-135 re-entry "video" being the latest example), but have never actually realised what SS actually is.

Can someone explain it??? Is it just a site tradition or is there a deeper meaning?

Thanks!
Dave Condliffe

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #1 on: 09/24/2018 03:37 PM »
Apologies if this is the wrong location, but I dodn't want to pollute the Shuttle sections with stupid questions.

In all the time I've been on this site, I've never seen an explanation of "Shuttle Sunday"

I see Chris bump threads often enough for Shuttle Sunday (the STS-135 re-entry "video" being the latest example), but have never actually realised what SS actually is.

Can someone explain it??? Is it just a site tradition or is there a deeper meaning?

Thanks!

It's just something Chris B started... like Throwback Thursday and Follow Friday on Twitter.  Alliteration to remember the past and the program from which this site was born in 2004 and the RTF from Columbia.

Offline Chris Bergin

Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #2 on: 09/24/2018 05:29 PM »
Because Sunday's ARE for Shuttles. ;D

Offline woods170

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Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #3 on: 09/27/2018 11:16 AM »
Because Sunday's ARE for Shuttles. ;D

More specifically: the very first shuttle, Columbia, was launched for the very first time on SUNDAY April 12, 1981.

Offline Lar

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Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #4 on: 09/28/2018 03:31 AM »
Because Sunday's ARE for Shuttles. ;D

More specifically: the very first shuttle, Columbia, was launched for the very first time on SUNDAY April 12, 1981.
It was a lot more challenging to watch things like that back in the day. No internet to get precise timings from, only the local and national print media and broadcast media. And you had to find a channel that carried it. But I watched the scrubs. Each time. And the launch. And the landing. Back then I believed we were at the dawn of a new era.
 
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

Offline JAFO

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Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #5 on: 09/29/2018 10:46 PM »
On my 9" black and white tv with rabbit ears before going to IBM 35 assembler class, carrying my backpack full of punchcards.
« Last Edit: 09/29/2018 10:48 PM by JAFO »
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Offline Hog

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Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #6 on: 10/01/2018 04:57 PM »
Tuning in Shuttle missions on the BUD(Big Ugly Dish) in my backyard.  AKA as the TVRO (TeleVision Receive Only)10 ft parabolic,
Back then it was called NASA Select and was set up so that managers and engineers had a realtime access to missions.

The changeover from Analogue to Digital was completed in 2005 after the 2nd return to flight of STS-114(STS-26 being the agencies 1st RTF).

I remember after the Test flights (STS-1-STS-4) when the mission numbers went from sequential to the Fiscal Year, Kennedy Space Center(prograde West to East-GEO) or Vandenberg(polar launches to the South-military missions using OV-103 Discovery missions) launch designations in 1984, the first digit is the Fiscal year 4 means 1984, 5 means 1985 and the 2nd digit was either 1 for Kennedy Space Center and "2" designates a Vandenberg AFB launch. And the 3rd digit(actually a letter) designated the sequence of that year. A=the first launch of the year, C- the 3rd launch, D=4th.  STS-62A was the first manifested launch from Vandenberg. 6=fiscal year 1986, "2"=Vandenberg AFB polar launch, and A=the first launch from Vandenberg that fiscal year.  The last launch using the conventional numbering was STS-9 and then I watched STS-41B and I thought I had missed like 30 launches when I saw STS-"41" on the screen during the STS-41B launch of Feb 3 1984. Obviously for the first post Challenger RTF mission, the mission numbering went back to the old numbering scheme with STS-26 pr STS-26(R) internally at NASA, R=reflight.

Satcom F2R  (COSPAR ID 1983-094A) was launched September 8, 1983. It replaced Satcom F-2 (COSPAR ID    1976-029A) which was launched on March 26, 1976. Both satellites were launched on a Delta 3000 launch vehicle.
For years NASA Select programming is carried on SATCOM F2R, transponder 13, located at 72 degrees West longitude.
It is now currently carried on Galaxy 13 (aka Horizons-1) located at 127º West longitude launched on October 1st 2003 on a Zenit-3SL launch vehicle from the Ocean Odyssey of Sea Launch.  This C-band service uses Transponder 11 using Vertical Polarity.

NTV-1
(Public-Education) is broadcast in HD
Video PID = 0x112 hex / 274 decimal,
AC-3   PID = 0x113 hex / 275 decimal,
MPEG I Layer II Audio PID = 0x114 hex / 276 decimal.

NTV-3
(Media) is also broadcast in High Definition
Program 103
Video PID  =  0x1031  hex  / 4145decimal
AC-3 PID    =  0x1034  hex  / 4148 decimal
MPEG I Layer II Aud PID = 0x1035 hex  /  4149 decimal   

NTV-4 (UHD) 
is now broadcast in Ultra High Definition (UHD)
Program 104
Compression Format: HEVC @ 13 Mbps
Video PID: 0x1041 hex/4161 decimal
MPEG I Layer II Audio PID: 0x1044 hex/ 4164 decimal
​AAC-LC PID:  0x1045 hex/4165 decimal


This is also a NASA’s Live Interactive Media Service (LIMS) available only on KU-band.
NASA LIMS (Live Satellite Interviews) Now KU-Band*

NASA’s Live Interactive Media Service (LIMS) has moved to KU-Band service. KU-Band parameters are provided prior to each event. NASA will schedule each LIMS event on a satellite in proximity of AMC18 whenever possible. AMC-18 is located at 139º West. AMCX-18 was launched on December 8 2006 on an Ariane 5ECA V174 launch vehicle from Kourou ELA-3 in French Guiana by Arianespace.

Uplink provider = TBD
Transponder = TBD
KU-Band

Bandwidth = 18 MHz
Transmission Format = DVB-S, 4:2:0
Data Rate = 12 Mbps
Modulation: QPSK/DVB-S
MPEG-4 encoding (MPEG-2 available upon request)
HD 16x9
*C-Band LIMS service is not available.
Paul

Online SkipMorrow

Re: "Shuttle Sunday"
« Reply #7 on: 10/03/2018 03:16 PM »
Are there other official audio and video sources today (perhaps streamed) that NASA staff (and families perhaps) can use from home? I remember the movie "The Right Stuff" and the wives would be listening on a special radio that allowed them to hear the radio calls. Other than watching NASA tv, I was wondering what else NASA staff might use to stay in touch when they are out of mission control.

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