Author Topic: Columbia STS-4 -1984  (Read 408 times)

Online catdlr

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Columbia STS-4 -1984
« on: 09/08/2018 04:24 AM »
Space Shuttle STS-4 Highlights 1982 NASA; 4th Flight of Columbia; Post Mission Press Conference Film

Jeff Quitney
Published on Sep 7, 2018

"Commander: Thomas K. Mattingly
Pilot: Henry W. Hartsfield, Jr.
Dates: June 17-July 4, 1982
Vehicle: Columbia OV-102
Payloads: IECM, MLR, NOSL, CFES, ACIP, DFI, SSIP (two experiments), GAS (nine experiments), and DOD
Landing site: Concrete runway 22 at Edwards AFB, CA

Narrated by the Commander and crew, this program contains footage selected by the astronauts, as well as their comments on the mission. Footage includes launch, onboard crew activities, and landing."

NASA film JSC-825

STS-4 was a NASA Space Shuttle mission, using the Space Shuttle Columbia. The mission launched on 27 June 1982 and landed a week later on 4 July. STS-4 was the fourth shuttle mission overall and was also the fourth mission for the Columbia.

From STS-4 onwards, NASA halted the appointment and training of complete backup flight crews. Instead, individual flight crew members were assigned backups who could take their place within the prime crew. The decision on whether to appoint a reserve crew member was made on a per-flight basis by flight management teams at Johnson Space Center. Consequently, the last NASA flight to have a full-time backup crew was STS-3...

STS-4 launched from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on 27 June 1982 at 11:00 am EST, with Ken Mattingly as commander, and Henry Hartsfield as the pilot. This mission marked the first time the Space Shuttle launched precisely at its scheduled launch time. It was also the last research and development flight in the program, after which NASA considered the shuttle operational.

STS-4's cargo consisted of the first Getaway Special payloads, including nine scientific experiments provided by students from Utah State University, and a classified US Air Force payload of two missile launch-detection systems. (A secret mission control center in Sunnyvale, California participated in monitoring the flight. Mattingly, who was an active-duty naval officer, later described the classified payload—two sensors for detecting missile launches— as "rinky-dink collection of minor stuff they wanted to fly". The payload failed to operate.)

In the shuttle's mid-deck, a Continuous Flow Electrophoresis System and the Mono-disperse Latex Reactor flew for the second time. The crew conducted a lightning survey with hand-held cameras and performed medical experiments on themselves for two student projects. They also operated the Remote Manipulator System with an instrument called the Induced Environment Contamination Monitor mounted on its end, designed to obtain information on gases or particles being released by the orbiter in flight.

Columbia landed on 4 July 1982 at 9:09 am PDT, on the 15,000 feet (4,600 m) concrete runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base, the first Shuttle landing on a concrete runway. President Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy greeted the crew upon arrival.

The flight lasted 7 days, 1 hour, 9 minutes and 31 seconds, and covered a total distance of 4,700,000 kilometers (2,900,000 mi) in 112 complete orbits. The mission achieved all objectives except for the Air Force payload, but two SRBs were lost when their main parachutes failed, causing the empty casings to impact the ocean at high velocity and sink. Columbia returned to KSC on 15 July.

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Reupload of a previously uploaded film, in one piece instead of multiple parts, and with improved video & sound.

Originally a public domain film from the US National Archives slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kqm6WKYK2Cc?t=001

« Last Edit: 09/08/2018 05:12 AM by catdlr »
Tony De La Rosa

Offline penguin44

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Re: Columbia STS-2 -1982
« Reply #1 on: 09/08/2018 04:43 AM »
Can we get post title changed to say sts-4?

Online catdlr

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Re: Columbia STS-4 -1984
« Reply #2 on: 09/08/2018 05:12 AM »
Can we get post title changed to say sts-4?

Done, thanks for catching my mistake.
Tony De La Rosa

Offline penguin44

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Re: Columbia STS-4 -1984
« Reply #3 on: 09/09/2018 05:02 AM »
Can we get post title changed to say sts-4?

Done, thanks for catching my mistake.

No problem. Just want to make sure everyone sees the great video you posted! Thanks for posting it. I'd never seen it before myself so it was a nice treat to watch it today.

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