Author Topic: Lockheed Martin awarded a $2.9 Billion contract for 3 Next-Gen OPIR GEO Sats  (Read 2186 times)

Offline Targeteer

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Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Sunnyvale, California, has been awarded a $2,935,545,188 not-to-exceed undefinitized contract for three Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared Geosynchronous Earth Orbit Space Vehicles.  This contract encompasses requirements analysis, design/development, critical path flight hardware procurement, early manufacturing, and risk reduction efforts leading to a system critical design review.  Work will be performed in Sunnyvale, California, and is expected to be completed by April 30, 2021. This award is the result of a sole-source acquisition and is not a multiyear contract. Fiscal 2018 research, development, test and evaluation funds in the amount of $80,000,000 are being obligated at the time of award. Space and Missile Systems Center, Los Angeles Air Force Base, California, is the contracting activity (FA8810-18-C-0005).
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Online gongora

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$2.9B for preliminary work towards building 3 sats.  Looks like they'll get another contract to actually build them.

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Is this the follow-on to SBIRS?
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Offline Billium

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I wonder what the chances are these stats will allow for horizontal integration?


Offline russianhalo117

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Is this the follow-on to SBIRS?
Yes. NG-OPIR GEO replaces previously ordered and recently cancelled SBIRS-GEO 7 and 8 along with the older STSS 1 and 2.
NG-OPIR Polar (SSO?) replaces the following cancelled and flown payload series: SBIRS-LADS, SBIRS-Low-FDS 1, 2, and STSS-ATRR.

NG-OPIR GEO will use the newest LM-2100M bus and NG-OPIR Polar will use a Northrop Grumman bus from either of the yet to be merged product lines of NGAS (TRW) and NGIS (OATK). The bus has not been publicly announced at the time of this post.
« Last Edit: 08/16/2018 03:24 PM by russianhalo117 »

Online kevin-rf

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Seeing how the DOD is in a rush to replace the SBIRS platform as fast as possible, including canceling two already ordered birds. Does this mean SBIRS did not fully meet the expectations for it? Or with the way IR sensors have been advancing over the last decade did better technologies come along that the DOD wanted to leverage. Curious....
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Online gongora

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Seeing how the DOD is in a rush to replace the SBIRS platform as fast as possible, including canceling two already ordered birds. Does this mean SBIRS did not fully meet the expectations for it? Or with the way IR sensors have been advancing over the last decade did better technologies come along that the DOD wanted to leverage. Curious....

I don't know the answer to that, but wanted to point out there are other issues that could encourage a change in direction of older satellite programs.  Increased focus on cybersecurity, moving to more standardized ground systems, moving to newer satellite buses, etc.

Offline jbenton

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Seeing how the DOD is in a rush to replace the SBIRS platform as fast as possible, including canceling two already ordered birds. Does this mean SBIRS did not fully meet the expectations for it? Or with the way IR sensors have been advancing over the last decade did better technologies come along that the DOD wanted to leverage. Curious....

I don't know the answer to that, but wanted to point out there are other issues that could encourage a change in direction of older satellite programs.  Increased focus on cybersecurity, moving to more standardized ground systems, moving to newer satellite buses, etc.

SpaceNews has an article about this:

https://spacenews.com/lockheed-martin-secures-2-9-billion-air-force-contract-for-three-missile-warning-satellites/

They say that that the USAF is looking for more "survivability" (probably concerned with cyber-threats) They also said that the new sats will be similar to the old ones but with "modernized buses and sensors" so the new sensors (to be purchased separately, possibly with a different company) are part of it, but there's also something about today's buses that they like - maybe fuel efficiency, lighter weight for heavier payloads?

Online kevin-rf

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I thought the articles stated, Northrup was still making the primary IR sensor.

That said, with all the recent foreign programs focusing on satellite inspection, ASAT like like, but not ASAT tests, high power lasers, ect. I wonder if some the survivability is physical survivability.
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Offline Jim

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but there's also something about today's buses that they like - maybe fuel efficiency, lighter weight for heavier payloads?

No, just updating to remove obsolesce parts.

Offline russianhalo117

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Seeing how the DOD is in a rush to replace the SBIRS platform as fast as possible, including canceling two already ordered birds. Does this mean SBIRS did not fully meet the expectations for it? Or with the way IR sensors have been advancing over the last decade did better technologies come along that the DOD wanted to leverage. Curious....
Its the latter in that their are updated busses and hardware out there and with a long running programme there is presented obsolesce and outdated generations of technologies that need to be transitioned to the latest generation as the valuation of older technologies depreciates its worth over time. There are other factors. Instead building SBIRS 7 and 8 they decided to move on to the renamed follow on programmes.

Offline jbenton

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I thought the articles stated, Northrup was still making the primary IR sensor.

That said, with all the recent foreign programs focusing on satellite inspection, ASAT like like, but not ASAT tests, high power lasers, ect. I wonder if some the survivability is physical survivability.

Physical survivablity? Like armor or what?

(I may be misreading your post)

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