Author Topic: A failed Venus probe is coming home  (Read 4055 times)

Offline ejb749

  • Member
  • Posts: 63
  • Troy, MI
  • Liked: 37
  • Likes Given: 7
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #20 on: 07/11/2018 04:21 PM »
I found this article with that photo...

http://www.russianspaceweb.com/venera72_kosmos482.html

Offline Archibald

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2551
  • Liked: 447
  • Likes Given: 1039
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #21 on: 07/11/2018 04:45 PM »
They should have hired Wonderwoman for the job. She would have flipped that agressive soviet probe with the tip of a finger.
« Last Edit: 07/11/2018 04:45 PM by Archibald »
... that ackward moment when you realize that Jeff Bezos personal fortune is far above NASA annual budget... 115 billion to 18 billion...

Online Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 738
  • Germany
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 272
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #22 on: 07/11/2018 05:04 PM »
2 large objects burned up in 1981 and 1983.
It is believed that it was the probe (Cosmos 482) and "blok L" (stage 4).

Online Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 738
  • Germany
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 272
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #23 on: 07/11/2018 05:11 PM »
The still-in-orbit object 1972-023E is called a "fragment" in RAE-table.
« Last Edit: 07/11/2018 05:11 PM by Alter Sachse »

Offline gwiz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 482
  • Cornwall
  • Liked: 74
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #24 on: 07/11/2018 06:34 PM »
The photograph clearly shows that 1972-023E is the complete probe and it was still in orbit in 2011.  Clearly when whatever separated in June 1972 (capsule thermal cover would be my guess) the wrong item was labelled as debris.

Online Phillip Clark

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2324
  • Hastings, England
  • Liked: 354
  • Likes Given: 879
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #25 on: 07/11/2018 07:41 PM »
Vaguely recall someone getting a good photo of Kosmos 482 and showing it was still the complete vehicle with the capsule still attached.

Depends when the photo was taken of course.
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Online Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 738
  • Germany
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 272
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #26 on: 07/12/2018 07:17 AM »
1972-023E
(2018 July 09)
52.05 112.39min 202-2471 km

Offline gwiz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 482
  • Cornwall
  • Liked: 74
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #27 on: 07/12/2018 02:27 PM »
Depends when the photo was taken of course.
2011, see this link posted above by ejb749:
http://www.russianspaceweb.com/venera72_kosmos482.html
« Last Edit: 07/12/2018 02:27 PM by gwiz »

Online Phillip Clark

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2324
  • Hastings, England
  • Liked: 354
  • Likes Given: 879
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #28 on: 07/12/2018 03:08 PM »
I note that Anatoly Zak says "With less degree of certainty, it can be speculated that the Venus lander is still attached to the main probe while its upper stage is not" (my own emphasis).

After my earlier posting, I realised that the appearance of Object E would be too early for the timed separation of the capsule.   This normally happens in the final stage of the approach to Venus and Venera 8's descent was on July 22.   One would expect that the Venera/Cosmos 382 capsule would have separated at about the same time.   Maybe the capsule separated earlier than planned?   Or maybe some other part of the spacecraft broke away?

Zak refers to objects, presumably from the Molniya-M's fourth stage, were found in New Zealand.   I assume that these are what Geoff Perry referred to as the "Ashburton balls" at the time.
I've always been crazy but it's kept me from going insane - WJ.

Offline gwiz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 482
  • Cornwall
  • Liked: 74
  • Likes Given: 2
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #29 on: 07/12/2018 06:29 PM »
I note that Anatoly Zak says "With less degree of certainty, it can be speculated that the Venus lander is still attached to the main probe while its upper stage is not" (my own emphasis).
If the capsule separated, where is it?  It must have a higher ballistic coefficient than the main probe and photo shows that the probe is still in orbit as 1972-023E, so the capsule should be as well.  Whatever separated in June 1972 and took over the 1972-023A designation had a lower ballistic coefficient than 1972-023E, as shown by its much more rapid decay rate.

Online Alter Sachse

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 738
  • Germany
  • Liked: 140
  • Likes Given: 272
Re: A failed Venus probe is coming home
« Reply #30 on: 07/15/2018 06:44 PM »
I want to quote Spaceflight vol. 44 (September 2002):
"In early June 2002 the Action Report issued by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Centers
Orbit lnformation Group included a change-of-name for the object catalogued as 1972-
023E. It had previously been designated simply as "debris" but the amendment renamed it as
"Cosmos 482 Descent craft"."
....
"The object catalogued as 1972-23E was not catalogued until about June 29, 1972,..."


Tags: