Author Topic: Virgin Orbit LauncherOne : Orbital Test Flight : late 2018  (Read 1862 times)

Online gongora

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Tweet from Jeff Foust
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The FAA has issued a launch license to Virgin Orbit for its first LauncherOne mission: http://bit.ly/2yXXMfs
« Last Edit: 09/24/2018 10:06 PM by gongora »

Offline deruch

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Re: Virgin Orbit LauncherOne : Orbital Test Flight
« Reply #1 on: 06/29/2018 10:39 PM »
Seems an odd use of language that the payload is listed as: Mass Simulator with CubeSat.  As opposed to "mass simulator and cubesat."  Hmm.

I also note that on the page following that screenshot'd by gongora, there is a list of the AFSS (Autonomous Flight Safety System) testing Virgin must complete and demonstrate prior to the launch:
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No less than one week prior to flight, VO must proivde the FAA with the following for review and acceptance:
(a)    Valve Acceptance Test Reports
(b)    Flght Computer Qualification Test Report
(c)    Flight Computer Acceptance Test Report
(d)    End-to-End Test Plan and Procedures
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online gongora

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Re: Virgin Orbit LauncherOne : Orbital Test Flight
« Reply #2 on: 09/24/2018 10:06 PM »
1657-EX-ST-2018
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Virgin Orbit is designing a satellite launch vehicle that will be air launched from a modified 747 airplane. STA License is requested to operate an S-Band Transmitter located on Launcher One for the upcoming first launch. 747 will take-off from Mojave Air and Space Port in California with Launcher One in captive carry. Launcher One will be dropped and launched in the Western Sea Range restricted airspace off Point Mugu, California. Launch license to be provided by FAA-Commercial Space Transportation Office. Captive carry flight and orbital trajectory details have been provided to NTIA.

NET date is Nov. 17

Offline jongoff

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Seems an odd use of language that the payload is listed as: Mass Simulator with CubeSat.  As opposed to "mass simulator and cubesat."  Hmm.

I'm not positive, but I think I know who is building the cubesat in question...

Offline Comga

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Tweet from Jeff Foust
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The FAA has issued a launch license to Virgin Orbit for its first LauncherOne mission: http://bit.ly/2yXXMfs

"launch azimuth of 163 degrees"?
Isn't that almost straight "backwards" against the rotation of the Earth?
Why make achieving orbit so difficult?
« Last Edit: 09/26/2018 05:50 AM by Comga »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline envy887

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Tweet from Jeff Foust
Quote
The FAA has issued a launch license to Virgin Orbit for its first LauncherOne mission: http://bit.ly/2yXXMfs

"launch azimuth of 163 degrees"?
Isn't that almost straight "backwards" against the rotation of the Earth?
Why make achieving orbit so difficult?

No, backwards would be 270 degrees (i.e. due west). 163 degrees is south-southeast.

Offline jongoff

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Tweet from Jeff Foust
Quote
The FAA has issued a launch license to Virgin Orbit for its first LauncherOne mission: http://bit.ly/2yXXMfs

"launch azimuth of 163 degrees"?
Isn't that almost straight "backwards" against the rotation of the Earth?
Why make achieving orbit so difficult?

No, backwards would be 270 degrees (i.e. due west). 163 degrees is south-southeast.

Ah, so probably roughly parallel to the coast?

Offline Comga

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Tweet from Jeff Foust
Quote
The FAA has issued a launch license to Virgin Orbit for its first LauncherOne mission: http://bit.ly/2yXXMfs

"launch azimuth of 163 degrees"?
Isn't that almost straight "backwards" against the rotation of the Earth?
Why make achieving orbit so difficult?

No, backwards would be 270 degrees (i.e. due west). 163 degrees is south-southeast.

Ah, so probably roughly parallel to the coast?

Yeah, it's nowhere near "backwards". (slaps forehead)

At what azimuth do sun synchronous orbits launch from Vandenberg?
Isn't it >180 degrees, south-southwest?

Someone here knows the real reason.  I just hope said person can and will post it.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

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