Author Topic: Superluminal communication  (Read 2406 times)

Offline BSu

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Superluminal communication
« on: 06/29/2018 07:53 am »
Has there been any progress toward possible FTL communication for instant signaling between planets? If so would then then allow for communication into the near past (6-12 months)?

Offline nacnud

  • Extreme Veteran
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2415
  • Liked: 634
  • Likes Given: 252
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #1 on: 06/29/2018 08:15 am »
No

Offline BSu

  • Member
  • Posts: 4
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #2 on: 06/29/2018 08:56 am »
Is there any active research in this field? I would  imagine it would be a topic of interest for a variety of reasons:

1. Real time communication (and control) with probes in space and other planets.

2. Real time communication with astronauts.

3. Possibilty of sending information backward in time.

Offline 1

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 163
  • El Segundo, CA
  • Liked: 303
  • Likes Given: 5
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #3 on: 06/29/2018 10:07 am »
a) Welcome to the forum, but
b) you've posted the same question in three different threads. Please don't do that.

The answer, for all practical purposes, is 'no'. FTL only exists as a hypothetical concept.

Offline ppnl

  • Full Member
  • **
  • Posts: 220
  • Liked: 132
  • Likes Given: 19
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #4 on: 06/29/2018 05:05 pm »
Is there any active research in this field? I would  imagine it would be a topic of interest for a variety of reasons:

1. Real time communication (and control) with probes in space and other planets.

2. Real time communication with astronauts.

3. Possibilty of sending information backward in time.

There is very little to research as known science is pretty clear on the subject. If we ever do discover any FTL effect it will probably be from a totally unexpected result. Not something you can have a research project for.

Offline Bill Christie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2
  • Vancouver, Canada
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #5 on: 11/22/2018 10:46 pm »
Is there any active research in this field? I would  imagine it would be a topic of interest for a variety of reasons:

1. Real time communication (and control) with probes in space and other planets.

2. Real time communication with astronauts.

3. Possibilty of sending information backward in time.
We detect em wave signals front on only and therefore consider the travel time to be the distance divided by the speed of light. On average it takes about 14 minutes for light to get from Mars to earth. However, if matter is a rotating planar wave with greater velocity at greater radii, then signals would be instantaneous albeit very weak signals. If we could detect such weak signals, we might detect and communicate with intelligent life far away.
Real time communication might become possible, but I don't think going back in real time is (cause and effect).
 

Offline meberbs

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1896
  • Liked: 1789
  • Likes Given: 418
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #6 on: 11/23/2018 07:13 pm »
We detect em wave signals front on only and therefore consider the travel time to be the distance divided by the speed of light. On average it takes about 14 minutes for light to get from Mars to earth. However, if matter is a rotating planar wave with greater velocity at greater radii, then signals would be instantaneous albeit very weak signals. If we could detect such weak signals, we might detect and communicate with intelligent life far away.
Real time communication might become possible, but I don't think going back in real time is (cause and effect).
I am not sure what you think you mean by "front on only" for em waves, but I think you are confused because that term does not make sense in context.

Your statement about "if matter is a rotating planar wave" does not fit with any possible view of the universe that is consistent with what we know about physics.

Your statement about real time communication being possible, while stating that time travel is not possible is inconsistent due to special relativity. Special relativity states that those 2 things are equivalent, because there is no universal definition of "instantaneous." There is no frame to consider the universal frame, so any instantaneous communication could be used to also send messages back in time and create a time loop.

Offline Bill Christie

  • Member
  • Posts: 2
  • Vancouver, Canada
  • Liked: 0
  • Likes Given: 0
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #7 on: 11/24/2018 06:53 am »
We detect em wave signals front on only and therefore consider the travel time to be the distance divided by the speed of light. On average it takes about 14 minutes for light to get from Mars to earth. However, if matter is a rotating planar wave with greater velocity at greater radii, then signals would be instantaneous albeit very weak signals. If we could detect such weak signals, we might detect and communicate with intelligent life far away.
Real time communication might become possible, but I don't think going back in real time is (cause and effect).
I am not sure what you think you mean by "front on only" for em waves, but I think you are confused because that term does not make sense in context.

Your statement about "if matter is a rotating planar wave" does not fit with any possible view of the universe that is consistent with what we know about physics.

Your statement about real time communication being possible, while stating that time travel is not possible is inconsistent due to special relativity. Special relativity states that those 2 things are equivalent, because there is no universal definition of "instantaneous." There is no frame to consider the universal frame, so any instantaneous communication could be used to also send messages back in time and create a time loop.
Thank you for your comments.

Imagine a photon coming around the sun and heading to earth. The path of that photon might bend somewhat but it lands on earth with a translational motion head on into someone's eyeball. Now imagine a photon whose path is bent so much that its path comes into a rotation. It will create a positron and electron. The hypothesis here is that the electron is a rotating wave. The em planar wave fronts fluctuate as they rotate about an axis.

We know that the electron moves in the direction of its axis of spin. In accordance with em wave theory, the electric field is perpendicular to the magnetic field and both are perpendicular to the direction of motion. Thus, when an electron rotating wave moves through space, its planar wave fronts must incline in order to maintain that perpendicular direction. Thus its effective length at any one time contracts and its time cycle slows down as the rotating planar wave fronts must travel a longer helical path through space. That is the Special Theory of Relativity for constant motion.

Time travel is merely slowing down ones clock while stationary observers keep their faster pace. The apparent connection between space and time is due to the rotating wave function of matter. If there are rotating waves, then perhaps highly evolved intelligence somewhere has increased detection of their weak signals and and used them in long distance communication.

The rotating wave model above assumes constant motion. It has four degrees of freedom: the x,y,z of space for the electron's translational (forward) motion and the rotational vector for time. For the General Theory a 5th degree of freedom is required to allow for gravity.

Offline meberbs

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1896
  • Liked: 1789
  • Likes Given: 418
Re: Superluminal communication
« Reply #8 on: 11/24/2018 04:15 pm »
Imagine a photon coming around the sun and heading to earth. The path of that photon might bend somewhat but it lands on earth with a translational motion head on into someone's eyeball.
The path can bend when it interacts with a medium, but it will then continue in a straight line unless the medium changes again. If there is a medium, its velocity is now less than the universal constant c though, so that is irrelevant to your previous statements. The path can also be bent by gravity, but this is really space-time being bent, is very slight, and basically is the light following the closest thing to a straight line that exists in bent space-time.

Now imagine a photon whose path is bent so much that its path comes into a rotation. It will create a positron and electron.
Bending so much it "comes into a rotation" is a phrase that makes no sense in this context. No matter what you mean, there is no way for a typical photonto spontaneously create a positron and an electron. Typical photons have nowhere near the energy and field strength to make this happen, and require multiple photons moving in (roughly) opposite directions. The situations where it is possible to generate electrons and positrons from photons have nothing to do with bent paths or rotations.

The hypothesis here is that the electron is a rotating wave. The em planar wave fronts fluctuate as they rotate about an axis.
Your hypothesis here is ill-defined and contrary to every experiment ever done on an electron, which all show the electron is a point particle (which due to quantum mechanics acts as a local wave, but "rotation" is not one of its fundamental properties.)

We know that the electron moves in the direction of its axis of spin.
No, spin does not refer to real motion of the electron, since it is a point particle.

In accordance with em wave theory, the electric field is perpendicular to the magnetic field and both are perpendicular to the direction of motion.
That is for EM wves far from any charges, not fields near an electron which is what you are now talking about.

Thus, when an electron rotating wave moves through space, its planar wave fronts must incline in order to maintain that perpendicular direction. Thus its effective length at any one time contracts and its time cycle slows down as the rotating planar wave fronts must travel a longer helical path through space. That is the Special Theory of Relativity for constant motion.
None of that makes any sense at all, besides the fact that you started from your nonsensical and incorrect hypothesis.

Time travel is merely slowing down ones clock while stationary observers keep their faster pace. The apparent connection between space and time is due to the rotating wave function of matter. If there are rotating waves, then perhaps highly evolved intelligence somewhere has increased detection of their weak signals and and used them in long distance communication.

The rotating wave model above assumes constant motion. It has four degrees of freedom: the x,y,z of space for the electron's translational (forward) motion and the rotational vector for time. For the General Theory a 5th degree of freedom is required to allow for gravity.
Again all nonsense. It sounds like you are referencing some made-up "rotating wave model" which does not in any way accurately describe the universe due to multiple inconsistencies with existing experiments. Specifics are hard to get into due to no actual definition of what the model is, just a bunch of statements that amount to word salad.
« Last Edit: 11/24/2018 04:15 pm by meberbs »

Tags: