Author Topic: RLVs and the quest for "airline-like operations"  (Read 7954 times)

Offline john smith 19

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Re: RLVs and the quest for "airline-like operations"
« Reply #60 on: 06/10/2018 06:05 PM »
IIRC  the Saturn was running a backup copy of the flight guidance on an Apollo Guidance Computer which took over. IOW the computer was on a payload. Since this was not happening with the Atlas, range safety destroyed it.


No, the Saturn launch vehicle guidance system was unaffected by the strike.  The spacecraft avionics, including the AGC, were knocked offline by the surge.
The perils of relying on memory without checking facts.
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Offline john smith 19

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Re: RLVs and the quest for "airline-like operations"
« Reply #61 on: 06/10/2018 06:08 PM »
They still are developed months in advance.  DoLILU, which has been available in most vehicles since the '70s, only provides for adjustments for winds in the first 100k ft.  The trajectory is basically the same.
I'm quite surprised at that. NASA made quite a point of DoLILU. They gave the impression all other ELV's had their ascent programs designed months in advance and once it was out of spec it was months before it could be reused.
« Last Edit: 06/10/2018 06:25 PM by john smith 19 »
BFS. The worlds first Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured A380 sized aerospaceplane tail sitter capable of flying in Earth and Mars atmospheres. BFR. The worlds biggest Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured booster for BFS. First flight to Mars by end of 2022. Forward looking statements. T&C apply. Believe no one. Run your own numbers. So, you are going to Mars to start a better life? Picture it in your mind. Now say what it is out loud.

Offline Jim

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Re: RLVs and the quest for "airline-like operations"
« Reply #62 on: 06/10/2018 06:13 PM »
The climb into LEO is basically the same for most launches of a specific vehicle, especially for a GTO comsat. There isn't much to change

Offline laszlo

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Re: RLVs and the quest for "airline-like operations"
« Reply #63 on: 06/10/2018 08:06 PM »

1.  It had nothing to do with being "certified for instrument flying".  Most of the entry is done on instruments.  The orbiter was more instrumented than "certified" aircraft. 
a.  The main reason was moisture in the clouds
b.  NASA wanted visual cues since there was no go around capability.
Which comes down to Shuttle being VFR rated only.  Different words, same result.  :(
...

IMC is not the same as IFR.
VFR is not the same as not IFR.
Not IMC is not the same as VFR.

IMC is instrument meteorological conditions, not enough visibility to use external references.
VFR is visual flight rules, which is navigation and control procedures using external visual references.
IFR is instrument flight rules, which is navigation and control procedures using internal instrument references.

You can pretty much mix and match those three in any combination. For example, it is perfectly possible to be flying VFR in IMC. Typically this is an emergency situation. You can also fly IFR in non-IMC conditions. This is routinely done for traffic, rather than weather avoidance. It's also the safest option for night flying. IFR in IMC is the safe option for flying through clouds (at least through certain types of clouds).

So while the Shuttle was not supposed to fly through clouds, it could if it had to and it was flying under IFR regardless.

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