Author Topic: NASA, Boeing rewriting the book on building the SLS Core Stage  (Read 4890 times)

Online Chris Bergin

FEATURE ARTICLE:

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/02/nasa-boeing-rewriting-book-building-sls-core-stage/

- by Philip Sloss

Everything you wanted to know about the SLS Core Stage but were afraid to ask! 4000 words, so remember to also click "Page 2"!

Offline Rocket Science

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Beefy article Philip, thank you for a great piece of work! :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator, Vintage auto racer

Online zubenelgenubi

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Ditto; thank you for writing a great article, Philip!
« Last Edit: 02/28/2018 08:53 PM by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline tesla

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Beautiful. The world's most powerful rocket is coming together!

What an incredible job the workforce did. I am so impressed.  :D

SLS/Orion will be THE exploration system. Thank you congress and America for the worldwide most epic space program!

GO SLS! GO NASA! GO Human Space Flight!
« Last Edit: 02/28/2018 09:00 PM by tesla »
Go SLS and Orion! God bless America.

Offline D_Dom

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« Last Edit: 02/28/2018 09:16 PM by D_Dom »
Space is not merely a matter of life or death, it is considerably more important than that!

Online Markstark

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Well done


« Last Edit: 03/01/2018 03:50 AM by Andy USA »

Online Johnnyhinbos

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Great construction, tremendous effort to put it together. Lots of blood sweat and tears went into it for sure (Iím talking about the article).

Now Iím just going to ball it up and toss it in the ocean...



(Sorry - couldnít help myself. Great job - interesting read, honestly!)
John Hanzl. Author, action / adventure www.johnhanzl.com

Online dglow

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The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?

Offline Fequalsma

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That would be... unfortunate.  And expensive.

The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?

Offline SimonFD

Great article!

Really looking forward to seeing this thing fly  8)
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Offline woods170

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The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?
That would be... unfortunate.  And expensive.

And we have a winner for the understatement of the year. ;)

Offline john smith 19

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Thank you for a very informative article. It has taught me several things.

There are several Structural Test Articles.

Essentially the architecture is the Shuttle SRBs and the ET in parallel, complete with through beam, rather than  a giant Titan III or Ariane 5 structure, right down to the on board APUs and presumably their highly toxic MMH fuel.

They are running 3 shifts, so the pay bill must be pretty big.

Historical side note. The Saturn IMU were spinning metal gyrocscopes spun up by large GN2 tanks. IIRC the IMU alone weighed about 150lbs.

BFS. The worlds first Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured A380 sized aerospaceplane tail sitter capable of flying in Earth and Mars atmospheres. BFR. The worlds biggest Methane fueled FFORSC engined CFRP structured booster for BFS. First flight to Mars by end of 2022. Forward looking statements. T&C apply. Believe no one. Run your own numbers. So, you are going to Mars to start a better life? Picture it in your mind. Now say what it is out loud.

Offline psloss

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right down to the on board APUs and presumably their highly toxic MMH fuel.
My understanding is the SRBs retained the Shuttle hydrazine-based HPUs; the Core Stage units went to helium spin-start / GH2 tap-off, which I believe is along the lines of the D4 CBCs.

Offline Starlab90

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That would be... unfortunate.  And expensive.

The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?

Not necessarily. EM-1 has performance margin, so it's possible to reduce throttle settings during the most stressing points in the flight. We're already doing that in at least one area I'm familiar with. Also, some of you will remember ET mods being made at KSC when cracks were found.

Even back when the STAs were planned to be built first, there was still a risk, because the time required to instrument the STAs, conduct the tests, and then do the post-test analysis meant that we wouldn't have the full results until CS-1 was complete. The most risk is actually with the ES STA, I'm told, and those tests are done.

But great article, Phillip! The link to the article is being forwarded around MSFC, as usual.

Online dglow

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The most risk is actually with the ES STA, I'm told, and those tests are done.

That's great news. Thanks for your insight, Starlab90.

Offline Hog

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Thank you for a very informative article. It has taught me several things.

There are several Structural Test Articles.

Essentially the architecture is the Shuttle SRBs and the ET in parallel, complete with through beam, rather than  a giant Titan III or Ariane 5 structure, right down to the on board APUs and presumably their highly toxic MMH fuel.

They are running 3 shifts, so the pay bill must be pretty big.


Emphasis mine.
I took that as running "24/7" on the Engine Section of the Core Stage, not around the clock on every section of the C/S.
Paul

Offline gtae07

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That would be... unfortunate.  And expensive.

The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?

This is common in aircraft development programs.  At least in the ones I've worked on, the first flight article is the first frame and the STA is the second.  It allows the flight article to proceed with getting outfitted while the STA is being tested.

You have to clear limit load before first flight, IIRC.  Any issues found in the later/ultimate cases get fixes retrofitted to the existing fleet before certification.

With a rocket I'd imagine there are probably fewer load cases, but the same principle would probably apply.

Offline MATTBLAK

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Wasn't Shuttle 'Challenger' originally an STA?
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Offline IanThePineapple

Wasn't Shuttle 'Challenger' originally an STA?

Yes, it was.
« Last Edit: 05/10/2018 01:21 AM by IanThePineapple »

Offline Rocket Science

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That would be... unfortunate.  And expensive.

The article says they're building STA tanks after the flight tanks... what happens if structural testing finds something?

This is common in aircraft development programs.  At least in the ones I've worked on, the first flight article is the first frame and the STA is the second.  It allows the flight article to proceed with getting outfitted while the STA is being tested.

You have to clear limit load before first flight, IIRC.  Any issues found in the later/ultimate cases get fixes retrofitted to the existing fleet before certification.

With a rocket I'd imagine there are probably fewer load cases, but the same principle would probably apply.
Welcome to the forum! :)
"The laws of physics are unforgiving"
~Rob: Physics instructor, Aviator, Vintage auto racer

Offline Hog

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Wasn't Shuttle 'Challenger' originally an STA?
Yup, originally STA-099 transformed into OV-099.  After her initial April 1983 flight, she was the workhorse of the fleet performing 85% of the mission load.

pics
#1 STA-099 in 1979. Contract Award to Rockwell International, Space Transportation Systems Division for conversion from STA-099 to OV-099 in Jan 1979, work started immediately. Conversion was completed in July 1982 and she was shipped to KSC July 5 1982.
#2 OV-099 Challenger just 4 years later(August 25, 1983) being towed from the OPF to the VAB following STS-6 getting ready for STS-8.  Look at how new her RCS panels look, very similar to Enterprises today.
Paul

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