Author Topic: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)  (Read 1724 times)

Online speedevil

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LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« on: 01/25/2018 10:27 AM »
Perhaps slightly jumping the gun on this one, as launch is some way off, but there have been some interesting publications recently. This is not the LISA pathfinder mission ( http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=23410.0 ) which has recently terminated.





From the video - showing LISA pathfinder performance has - after some work - not only gotten to hoped for performance for it, which was a factor of 7 within LISA, but beat that as soon as it was turned on, and ended up once the limits were understood beating the required LISA spec.

LISA results will end up being very very different from LIGO.

LIGO is going to end up as time goes on, with some dozen or two events a year, for the advanced network.

The events last seconds to a handful of seconds.

LISA when it's turned on will be hearing thousands of ongoing events - we know of around a dozen binary white dwarfs for example that it will be able to hear that are basically static.

Large inspiralling black holes will inspiral over decade-day timescales.
Smaller black holes may be visible a few months before their detection in LIGO, allowing preparing for these events.

10-100 massive black hole mergers a year.
5-50 extreme-mass-ratio inspirals (>100) a year.
Thousands of binaries in our galaxy that we can pick up. (tens of millions that cannot be resolved).

Also on the above channel are a couple of videos on how to simulate and recover signals from gravitational wave detectors.
« Last Edit: 01/25/2018 10:29 AM by speedevil »

Offline kenny008

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Re: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« Reply #1 on: 01/25/2018 02:37 PM »
LISA has always been one of my favorite long-term observatories.  For decades, our observatories have all been methods of observing and analyzing the EM spectrum.  Having a completely new medium for sensing cosmic events will open up all kinds of new surprises.  Very exciting to see this presentation.

Online speedevil

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Re: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« Reply #2 on: 01/26/2018 05:55 PM »
To get further into the future, is it possible or impossible to localise a continuous GW source, given LISA will be orbiting in one plane?

Offline as58

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Re: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« Reply #3 on: 01/26/2018 07:17 PM »
To get further into the future, is it possible or impossible to localise a continuous GW source, given LISA will be orbiting in one plane?

Yes, sky localisation will be possible. Accuracy depends on a lot of things (how strong a source, how long observation, where exactly on the sky, etc.), but in some cases it should be better than one square degree.

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« Reply #4 on: 01/26/2018 10:42 PM »
LISA mission passes review successfully and begins next stage of development
January 22, 2018
Quote
Before an ESA mission reaches the launch pad, it has to go through a number of approval procedures that ensure the mission´s readiness.  The future space-based gravitational wave observatory, the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), has recently passed its Mission Definition Review (MDR) with flying colours.
The MDR´s goal is to review and confirm that:
- LISA´s present mission design is feasible and suitable,
- the mission requirements meet LISA´s science requirements,
- the requirements are mature and adequate to the current phase,
- the technology developments are adequate to the current phase, and
- the interfaces between spacecraft, payload ground segment and launcher are well defined.

“I am very satisfied that LISA passed the assessment so well. Now we are heading to the next phase. 2018 will be filled with further examinations, investigations and technology development. It’s great to see LISA making so much progress”, says Prof. Dr. Karsten Danzmann, director at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics (Albert Einstein Institute), director of the Institute for Gravitational Physics at Leibniz Universität Hannover, and LISA Consortium Lead.

LISA is scheduled for launch into space in 2034 as a mission of the European Space Agency (ESA). It is supported by many ESA member states as well as NASA and many scientists working together across the Atlantic.

LISA will consist of three satellites spanning an equilateral triangle with each side approx. 2.5 million kilometres long. Gravitational waves passing through the constellation change these distances by a fraction of the diameter of an atom. LISA´s key technologies were successfully demonstrated with ESA´s LISA Pathfinder mission, which operated from late 2015 until mid 2017.

LISA will measure low-frequency gravitational waves with oscillation periods ranging from 10 seconds to more than half a day, which cannot be observed with detectors on the earth. These are emitted by events such as supermassive black holes with millions of times the mass of our Sun merging at the centres of galaxies, the orbital motions of tens of thousands of binary stars in our Galaxy, and possibly exotic sources such as cosmic strings.

Further information:
https://www.lisamission.org
http://sci.esa.int/lisa/

https://www.lisamission.org/?q=news/top-news/lisa-mission-passes-review-successfully-and-begins-next-stage-development

Offline bolun

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Offline jbenton

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Re: LISA gravitational wave observatory (2034)
« Reply #6 on: 09/15/2018 12:13 AM »
LIGO seemingly disproves (or at least casts doubts) on any more than 3 spacial dimensions:

https://phys.org/news/2018-09-gravitational-dose-reality-extra-dimensions.html

Putting this here because this seems to be the sort of observations that LISA might make.

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