Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Hispasat 30W-6 (1F) : March 6, 2018 - UPDATES  (Read 77495 times)

Online Chris Bergin

UPDATE thread for Hispasat 30W-6 (Hispasat 1F) mission.

NSF Threads for Hispasat 30W-6 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage November-December,
 January-February / Party
NSF Articles for Hispasat 30W-6 :
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/02/falcon-9-static-fire-slc-40-hispasat-30w-6/
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/03/spacex-50-falcon-9-heavy-hispasat-launch/

Successful launch on March 6, 2018 at 0033 EST/0533 UTC on Falcon 9 (B1044) from SLC-40 at Cape Canaveral.  Payload mass was about 6mT.  Although a drone ship landing was initially planned, the offshore weather on the new launch date led to the decision to expend the booster.

Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section




Hispasat Press Release July 1, 2014:
Quote
Spanish satellite telecommunications operator HISPASAT has chosen Space Systems/Loral (SSL) to produce the Hispasat 1F, to be located at orbital position 30º West. The Hispasat 1F will serve as a replacement for the Hispasat 1D and will give the Group additional Ku band capacity, in the Andean region and in Brazil. Likewise, the Hispasat 1F will expand the Group’s transatlantic capacity in Europe-America and America-Europe connectivity. Ka band capacity with European coverage will furthermore be incorporated, in order to enable HISPASAT to continue expanding its broadband service offer in the region.

The Hispasat 1F is expected to have a useful life of 15 years. The satellite will be built on the SSL 1300 satellite platform, with 11.5 kW power and a multi-mission payload distributed across:

    48 Ku band transponders, which serve three coverage areas:

 - Europe and North Africa, with coverage on the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands, the Canary Islands,  the Azores, Cape Verde and Madeira; Mauritius, Morocco, Mediterranean countries in North West Africa and  the large part of the European continent visible from 30º West.

 - The Americas, with coverage from Canada to Patagonia, not including Brazil.

 - South America, with coverage over the large part of the continent, especially in Brazil.

     6 Ka band beams, with coverage on the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic and Canary Islands, North West Africa and South East and Central Europe.
    1 Ka BSS band beam, with coverage centred in the Iberian Peninsula.
    1 C band beam, with coverage centred in Brazil.

In the words of their managing director, Carlos Espinós, “HISPASAT is once again placing its trust in SSL, given the high-quality and reliability of their products. SSL has provided us with a compelling opportunity to team together. We are sure their 1300 platform is best suited for delivering the high service performance our company designed the Hispasat 1F to deliver. Furthermore, we are pleased to note that as a leader in geostationary satellite manufacturing, SSL benefits from Spanish built components on nearly all of its satellites”.

Indeed, John Celli, president of SSL, confirmed that “Hispasat 1F is the third satellite that SSL will build for HISPASAT and we are pleased to welcome our colleagues back to our facility. Our companies share a focus on quality, reliability and value and we look forward to teaming together again to build an outstanding satellite”.

The 1300 platform makes it possible to house a wide range of payloads for commercial communications satellites and its wide in-orbit experience serves to testify the high reliability it provides. In fact, the Hispasat 1F will be the Group’s third satellite to be built based on this experience. Furthermore, SSL’s expertise in manufacturing such large, complex satellites guarantees the Hispasat 1F will be delivered in line with HISPASAT requirements.
Hispasat page for 30W-6


Hispasat 30W-6 on Gunter's Space Page
« Last Edit: 03/06/2018 05:09 AM by gongora »

Online Chris Bergin

 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 January 16, 2018

SSL-built satellite for HISPASAT arrives at SpaceX launch base

PALO ALTO, Calif. - SSL, a Maxar Technologies company (formerly MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.), and a leading provider of innovative satellites and spacecraft systems, announced today that the advanced Hispasat 30W-6 satellite, previously called Hispasat 1F, has arrived at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, where it will launch aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 launch vehicle. Advances on the satellite demonstrate SSL’s ability to collaborate with its customers on innovations that will drive future space capabilities.

 “It has been an honor to work closely with the Hispasat team to implement advances on a powerful state of the art communications satellite,” said Dario Zamarian, group president, SSL. “With Hispasat 30W-6 now at launch base, we are helping drive the industry forward with innovations that will help reduce mass and improve performance, resulting in a better business case for satellite communications.”

 SSL and Hispasat worked together to include key developments on Hispasat 30W-6, which has a primary mission of providing communications services in Europe and the Americas. It carries a photonics demonstration, which will prove the value of using photonics for data routing within the satellite. In the future, this technology is expected to reduce satellite mass and enhance payload performance. The photonics receiver, provided by DAS Photonics, replaces traditional microwave components with optical, solid-state components that enable greater flexibility and throughput.

 Hispasat 30W-6 was designed to provide service for television, broadband, corporate networks and other telecommunications applications. It will replace Hispasat 30W-4 at 30 degrees West longitude where it will provide service to Europe, North Africa, and the Americas.

 “Hispasat 30W-6 is the fourth satellite that SSL has provided to our company,” said Carlos Espinós, chief executive officer at HISPASAT. “SSL has been a flexible and reliable partner in working with us on technological advances that make satellite communications more cost effective and enable next generation space systems and missions. We look forward to using Hispasat 30W-6 to expand our service offerings and capacity in the covered regions.”

 SSL

SSL, based in Palo Alto, California, is a leading provider of advanced spacecraft systems, with broad expertise to support commercial and government satellite operators and innovative space missions. The company designs and manufactures spacecraft for services such as direct-to-home television, video content distribution, broadband internet, mobile communications, in-orbit servicing, space exploration, and Earth observation. As a Silicon Valley innovator for 60 years, SSL’s advanced product line includes state-of-the-art small satellites, and sophisticated robotics and autonomous solutions for remote operations.  SSL is a Maxar Technologies company (NYSE: MAXR; TSX: MAXR).  For more information, visit www.sslmda.com

 Maxar

Maxar Technologies (formerly MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates) is a leading global provider of advanced space technology solutions for commercial and government markets including satellites, Earth imagery, geospatial data and analytics. As a trusted partner, Maxar Technologies provides unmatched end-to-end advanced systems capabilities and integrated solutions expertise to help our customers anticipate and address their most complex mission critical challenges with confidence. With more than 6,500 employees in over 21 locations, the Maxar Technologies portfolio of commercial space brands includes: SSL, MDA, DigitalGlobe, and Radiant Solutions. Every day millions of people rely on Maxar Technologies to communicate, share information and data, and deliver insights that empower a better world. Maxar trades on the Toronto Stock Exchange and New York Stock Exchange as MAXR. For more information visit www.maxar.com.

Online Chris Bergin

Static Fire now NET Feb 20 for a launch on the 25th

Online Chris Bergin

Rolling out for the Static Fire test.

Online Chris Bergin

B1044.1 is *supposed* to be lofting a spacecraft so heavy it negates a safe landing of the booster, but visual observations note fins and landing legs.

Could be another "very high retrothrust landing" test

Online Chris Bergin

44 now erect on SLC-40!

Online Chris Bergin

Falcon 9 preparing for static fire test at SLC-40 before the Hispasat 30W-6 mission -
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/02/falcon-9-static-fire-slc-40-hispasat-30w-6/

- By Ian Atkinson.

Online Chris Bergin

Static Fire Window is 1800-0000 Eastern.
« Last Edit: 02/20/2018 10:12 PM by Chris Bergin »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Quote
Static fire test of Falcon 9 complete—targeting February 25 launch of Hispasat 30W-6 from Pad 40 in Florida.

https://twitter.com/spacex/status/966187350740127744

Offline Raul

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Hispasat 30W-6 Launch Hazard Areas based on issued NOTMAR.
There is also included M1393 droneship position as possible landing position.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Launch weather forecast is 80% GO:

Quote
Launch day probability of violating launch weather constraints: 20%
Primary concern(s): Cumulus Cloud Rule
   
Delay day probability of violating launch weather constraints: 30%
Primary concern(s): Cumulus Cloud Rule, Thick Cloud Rule

Online Michael Baylor

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LANDING ATTEMPT ALERT!!!

OCISLY is leaving Port Canaveral right now. As usual, Hawk is the tug.

Online stcks

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heading out!

Online docmordrid

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https://twitter.com/ChrisG_NSF/status/966425748448915456

Chris G - NSF @ChrisG_NSF
Hot damn, ASDS Of Course I Still Love You is heading out of Port Canaveral. Timing is right for it to be leaving to try to catch the #HispaSat core this weekend, previously thought to be expendable! #SpaceX #Falcon9
4:33 PM - Feb 21, 2018
« Last Edit: 02/21/2018 10:39 PM by docmordrid »
DM

Online Michael Baylor

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GO Quest and GO Pursuit are now in pursuit of OCISLY. This is GO Pursuit's first recovery assignment for SpaceX. Most likely, one of the boats will support OCISLY and the other will support fairing recovery tests. Note that these boats do not have a net like Mr. Steven, so the best that they can do is collect data and pull something out of the water.

Most likely, GO Quest will support OCISLY and GO Pursuit will support fairings.

Online catdlr

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SpaceX - Hipasat 30W-6 - Static Fire Test 02-20-2018

USLaunchReport
Published on Feb 21, 2018

Looked like the way SpaceX used to load.A large LOX cloud formed down range for a mile.(Too dark to film) This must be a Block 3 Falcon. Hopefully, we will see fairing recovery.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6AfmLztuKCA?t=001

Tony De La Rosa

Offline lrk

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SpaceX - Hipasat 30W-6 - Static Fire Test 02-20-2018
Looked like the way SpaceX used to load.A large LOX cloud formed down range for a mile.(Too dark to film) This must be a Block 3 Falcon.

Hipasat is flying on core 1044's maiden flight, which is a Block 4 core. 

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Launch weather forecast issued on L-3, no real change - still 80% GO:

Quote
Launch day probability of violating launch weather constraints: 20%
Primary concern(s): Cumulus Cloud Rule
   
Delay day probability of violating launch weather constraints: 30%
Primary concern(s): Cumulus Cloud Rule, Thick Cloud Rule

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Airspace closure area and launch hazard area

Offline RocketLover0119

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Confirmed by SFN, that the S1 has Titanium fins!

"Long-distance views of the Falcon 9 rocket standing on the Complex 40 launch pad Wednesday revealed its first stage booster — newly-manufactured for the Hispasat mission — is fitted with titanium grid fins used for steering during descent back to Earth."

(Picture and info are from their post test fire article)
https://spaceflightnow.com/2018/02/21/spacex-fires-up-falcon-9-rocket-for-weekend-launch-from-florida/
« Last Edit: 02/22/2018 09:43 PM by RocketLover0119 »
"The Falcon has landed"

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