Author Topic: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion  (Read 65343 times)

Online meekGee

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #480 on: 12/24/2017 01:51 PM »
They need a license for the second stage, not for the roadster.

If there's no footage planned, why even bother launching it in the first place?
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Offline Oersted

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #481 on: 12/24/2017 02:07 PM »
Does SpaceX have access to a big enough vacuum chamber to make sure nothing in the roadster explodes?

No, but they have access to SPACE!

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Offline WizZifnab

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #482 on: 12/24/2017 03:04 PM »
I assume that Elon maintains ownership of the Tesla after its deployed right?  At what point could someone decide to 'salvage' it?

I was initially thinking about a time capsule in the trunk.  But then thought maybe put some things that would appreciate in value.  So that the longer its out there the more valuable they become.  To actually encourage development of commercial technology to rendezvous and retrieve...at the very least as a 'prize'.

Maybe on Elon's death he releases a list of a few things that might encourage retrieval in the distant future?  Hopefully the vehicle itself would be left orbiting in space.

Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #483 on: 12/24/2017 03:13 PM »
I assume that Elon maintains ownership of the Tesla after its deployed right?  At what point could someone decide to 'salvage' it?

I was initially thinking about a time capsule in the trunk.  But then thought maybe put some things that would appreciate in value.  So that the longer its out there the more valuable they become.  To actually encourage development of commercial technology to rendezvous and retrieve...at the very least as a 'prize'.

Maybe on Elon's death he releases a list of a few things that might encourage retrieval in the distant future?  Hopefully the vehicle itself would be left orbiting in space.

Quote
If I manage to find the Tesla Roadster in Mars orbit and retrieve it, can I keep it? @elonmusk

Quote
Yes

Tweets are not exactly legally binding, but someone's floated the idea to Elon already.

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/944783379022540800
« Last Edit: 12/24/2017 03:13 PM by tvg98 »

Online Coastal Ron

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #484 on: 12/24/2017 03:25 PM »
Quote
If I manage to find the Tesla Roadster in Mars orbit and retrieve it, can I keep it? @elonmusk

Quote
Yes

Tweets are not exactly legally binding, but someone's floated the idea to Elon already.

https://twitter.com/elonmusk/status/944783379022540800

That could create some level of demand to go to Mars (i.e. to retrieve something of potential value). Maybe not a $1B worth, but little by little Musk is likely enticing people to go to Mars...
If we don't continuously lower the cost to access space, how are we ever going to afford to expand humanity out into space?

Offline Comga

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #485 on: 12/24/2017 04:57 PM »
A dark red, carbon fiber bodied <3 m car in interplanetary space will be nigh on impossible to find.
A car attached to a white, 4 my 6 meter aluminum second stage has a somewhat greater chance.
What would be the advantage of separating other than seeing it drift off?
Given the Elon-logic  of launching his car onto space, that may be enough
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online docmordrid

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #486 on: 12/24/2017 05:01 PM »
Unless they want to test a higher mass payload adapters separation.
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Offline dodo

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #487 on: 12/24/2017 05:02 PM »
Higher resolution images now released by SpaceX

Is there any reason why the car appears to be slanted on the adapter? Seems like the best way to have it sliding sideways during ascent.

P.S.: On second though, maybe a silly question. Perhaps it's the only way it fits.
« Last Edit: 12/24/2017 05:09 PM by dodo »

Online meekGee

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #488 on: 12/24/2017 05:12 PM »
A dark red, carbon fiber bodied <3 m car in interplanetary space will be nigh on impossible to find.
A car attached to a white, 4 my 6 meter aluminum second stage has a somewhat greater chance.
What would be the advantage of separating other than seeing it drift off?
Given the Elon-logic  of launching his car onto space, that may be enough
A solar-powered beacon/transponder and a retro-reflector would be much better for locating it at some future date.

And yes, the drift-off shot is half the PR value here.

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Offline cscott

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #489 on: 12/24/2017 05:31 PM »
P.S.: On second though, maybe a silly question. Perhaps it's the only way it fits.
Yeah.  I think if you scroll back you can find NSF renders on a slanted orientation from before the Elon reveal, based solely on the published payload volume and the roadster dimensions. (And the fact that the jack points on the bottom frame of the car are the logical lift points.)
« Last Edit: 12/24/2017 05:32 PM by cscott »

Offline Comga

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #490 on: 12/24/2017 06:10 PM »
P.S.: On second though, maybe a silly question. Perhaps it's the only way it fits.
Yeah.  I think if you scroll back you can find NSF renders on a slanted orientation from before the Elon reveal, based solely on the published payload volume and the roadster dimensions. (And the fact that the jack points on the bottom frame of the car are the logical lift points.)
Not true
The roadster fits within a 3.0 meter circle.
Fitting within the dynamic envelope is not the reason for tiliting it.
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Online aero

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #491 on: 12/24/2017 06:33 PM »
Dimensions of the Tesla Roadster, 2011 - 155″ L x 44″ H

How does that fit into a 3-meter circle? A 4-meter circle, yes.
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Offline mme

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #492 on: 12/24/2017 06:54 PM »
It would make some more sense to me to maximize the publicity for Tesla to launch the new roadster than the old one which is no longer available to buy.
There's no such thing as a new roadster unless you wait until 2020. I think using a new car (for models they are currently making) would be a real blunder given that Teslas tend to have long delivery times.
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Offline whatever11235

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #493 on: 12/24/2017 08:06 PM »
It would make some more sense to me to maximize the publicity for Tesla to launch the new roadster than the old one which is no longer available to buy.
There's no such thing as a new roadster unless you wait until 2020. I think using a new car (for models they are currently making) would be a real blunder given that Teslas tend to have long delivery times.

There is a prototype of new roadster.

Offline Jimmy Murdok

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #494 on: 12/24/2017 08:15 PM »
The inner fairing is 4,6m  the car is 3,946 mm x 1,873 mm. The hypotenuse is 4,367. Clearance is a bit tight but on space technology should be fine.

Offline First Mate Rummey

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #495 on: 12/24/2017 08:48 PM »
It would make some more sense to me to maximize the publicity for Tesla to launch the new roadster than the old one which is no longer available to buy.
There's no such thing as a new roadster unless you wait until 2020. I think using a new car (for models they are currently making) would be a real blunder given that Teslas tend to have long delivery times.

There is a prototype of new roadster.

Not only a prototype, already tested by some journalists (you can find videos on YouTube), but you can already also reserve it now, and it is quite expensive, so this would really be the right time for sponsoring it:
https://www.tesla.com/roadster?redirect=no

Offline cscott

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #496 on: 12/24/2017 10:32 PM »
Having built prototype hardware before---no *way* am I launching my only prototype into space.  The custom tooling for one off prototypes (before mass production) starts is insanely expensive, and there's only a small number of prototypes so you'd be setting the entire r&d process by months-to-years by losing access to one.

It's a silly idea.  The point of a mass simulator is to throw something you don't care about losing. Musk has 7 kids and a Model X as his daily driver. The first gen roadster, a fun toy from his bachelor life, fits the bill as a throwaway payload.  The one-and-only next-gen roadster? Not.
« Last Edit: 12/24/2017 10:33 PM by cscott »

Offline Lar

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #497 on: 12/24/2017 10:46 PM »
That could create some level of demand to go to Mars (i.e. to retrieve something of potential value). Maybe not a $1B worth, but little by little Musk is likely enticing people to go to Mars...
Or to Mars orbit, anyway...
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Offline Comga

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #498 on: 12/25/2017 12:04 AM »
The inner fairing is 4,6m  the car is 3,946 mm x 1,873 mm. The hypotenuse is 4,367. Clearance is a bit tight but on space technology should be fine.
There is no “hypotenuse” 😉
From above the car fits nicely in a circle the diameter of its length.
But your conclusion is correct. 
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline garcianc

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Re: Falcon Heavy Demo Mission Payload Discussion
« Reply #499 on: 12/25/2017 01:28 AM »
The inner fairing is 4,6m  the car is 3,946 mm x 1,873 mm. The hypotenuse is 4,367. Clearance is a bit tight but on space technology should be fine.
There is no “hypotenuse” 😉
From above the car fits nicely in a circle the diameter of its length.
But your conclusion is correct.
I think what Jimmy Murdok meant by hypotenuse is the diagonal, which is more important than the length. ~20cm of clearance (~10cm at each corner) is tight for a non-standard payload sitting atop a rocket that will shake the ground a mile away.

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