Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion  (Read 11886 times)

Offline mn

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #20 on: 12/27/2017 07:26 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Offline Lars-J

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #21 on: 12/27/2017 10:19 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
« Last Edit: 12/27/2017 10:20 PM by Lars-J »

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #22 on: 12/28/2017 06:31 AM »
They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.

Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

Online deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #23 on: 12/28/2017 08:52 AM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
The real answer is that it very much depends on their licensing situation for launches from the FL pads.  Zuma is a bad general example for switching because the end-user for that payload is USG (presumably for defense/intel).  So, while the launch was being treated as a commercial launch for licensing, the speed with which it was able to get a new license for a launch from SLC-40 is not at all indicative of what is "normal". 

It likely won't matter at all for GTO launches because SpaceX should have licenses for both pads that will cover multiple launches of that type without a need to specify the specific payload/mission.  The challenge would only be for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another because with the exception of Iridium or CRS launches, SpaceX hasn't gotten licenses that allow for multiple launches to LEO.  The advantage for GTO is that they are all launching on a 90deg. azimuth whereas for LEO each launch is going to a different inclination and so launches on a different azimuth. 

My guess is that for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another will require at least 60 days for new licensing. 
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Online speedevil

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #24 on: 12/28/2017 11:23 AM »
Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

From memory, it was asked that she and others supply actual proposals for change with a deadline that has passed by now.
I wonder if these are public yet.


Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #26 on: 01/06/2018 10:16 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 


Has RemoveDEBRIS arrived at KSC? If so, when? Any photos?
« Last Edit: 01/06/2018 11:16 PM by Yeknom-Ecaps »

Offline brujhar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #27 on: 01/11/2018 11:58 PM »
Hello guys,

Do you know the exact launch date of this mission?
I read on some sites that it would be on 03/13/2018 at 00:00 a.m.
 
Thank you

Online ZachS09

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #28 on: 01/11/2018 11:59 PM »
http://www.launchphotography.com/Delta_4_Atlas_5_Falcon_9_Launch_Viewing.html

SpX-14 will launch on March 5, 2018 at either 06:00 UTC or 07:00 UTC (1 AM Eastern or 2 AM Eastern).
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : Mar. 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #29 on: 01/12/2018 01:10 AM »
With CRS missions I wouldn't count on a particular date staying the same for the next two months.

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #30 on: 01/16/2018 03:52 PM »
The SpaceflightNow schedule shows this moving to April 2.

Tags: Launch date