Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion  (Read 59221 times)

Online gongora

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CRS-14 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-14 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage March-April / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-14:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Successful launch April 2, 2018 at 1630:38 EDT/2030 UTC on Falcon 9 (reused booster 1039.2) from SLC-40.  Dragon reused from CRS-8.  Booster expended.



External cargo: ASIM, RRM3 MISSE-FF, PFCS



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 04/03/2018 02:39 AM by gongora »

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #1 on: 11/24/2017 11:34 PM »
Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM)

ASIM Page at Terma (prime contractor)

http://www.asim.dk/

ASIM on Twitter
Quote
[Tweet from Nov. 24, 2017]
Passed Qualification and Acceptance Review successfully. @Terma_Global will pick-up ASIM in Tortona Monday and ship the flight model to @NASAKennedy.

[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.

ASIM is an advanced observatory to be mounted on the outside of the European Columbus module at ISS.

Once the observatory is in operation, ASIM will observe and photograph the large electrical discharges from thunder clouds in the area between the earth’s atmosphere and space – the layers called the stratosphere and mesosphere. These spectacular electrical discharges, known as red sprites, blue jets, haloes, and elves, were observed for the first time in 1989. There is great scientific interest in a closer study, and while staying at ISS in September 2015, Astronaut Andreas Mogensen made a series of spectacular recordings of the huge lightning phenomena.

The Danish technology company Terma is technical lead on the observatory, while Torsten Neubert, chief consultant at DTU Space, is scientific lead on this exciting program led by ESA in collaboration with the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI). Terma and DTU Space have both played a key role in the development of the advanced instruments included in the observatory.

"It has been an exciting challenge for Terma. This is the first time that we have been the technical main contractor on such a large space project, and thus responsible for the development and completion to the European Space Agency (ESA). With ASIM, the Danish space community has proven its expertise and the high scientific and technical level that it masters", says Carsten Jørgensen, Senior Vice President of Terma’s Space business.

According to Kristian Pedersen, Director of DTU Space, ASIM proves Danish international leadership – both within space science and technology:

"Danish space exploration is important to Denmark. With ASIM, we show that Denmark has technological and scientific competencies at a high international level, and that we at DTU, through collaboration with Danish industry, are at the forefront within important space applications. In addition, we hope that the program will help to attract more young people to studies in natural science. We need these engineers in future."

At an event at Terma in Herlev today, ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen unveiled a 1:1 model of the 314 kg observatory with a total value of DKK 350 million. Andreas Mogensen's participation in the event at Terma has been arranged in collaboration with ESA and the Danish Board of Education and Research.



« Last Edit: 11/24/2017 11:54 PM by gongora »

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #2 on: 11/25/2017 12:07 AM »
[NOTE:  RRM3 seems to have moved to a later flight]

Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3)

RRM3 page at GSFC (This page has lots of pictures, animations, explanations, etc.)
Quote
Mission Overview

RRM3 builds on the first two phases of International Space Station technology demonstrations that tested tools, technologies, and techniques to refuel and repair satellites in orbit. RRM3 will demonstrate innovative methods to store, transfer and freeze standard cryogenic fluid and xenon in space.

The mission is scheduled to launch to the space station in early 2018 aboard the SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services Mission 14 (CRS-14). It has a projected two-year life on the space station, though NASA intends to accomplish RRM3's objectives within the first year. RRM3 is developed and operated by the Satellite Servicing Projects Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, under direction of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate.

RRM3 Primary Objectives

1. Perform cryogenic liquid methane transfer
2. Perform xenon gas transfer

RRM3 Secondary Objectives

1. Maintain cryogen fluid mass for six months via zero boil-off
2. Demonstrate and validate the Compact Thermal Imager - An instrument that utilizes available room on RRM3 to observe Earth to detect smoke and fires, as well as measure crop transevaporation.
3.Complete Machine Vision Tasks -In-space assessment of fiducials (decals) with unique patterns that enhance machine vision algorithms and aid in autonomous rendezvous and tool positioning.

[NASA Apr. 3, 2017] NASA Robotic Refueling Mission Departs Station (overview of RRM program to date)

« Last Edit: 03/14/2018 06:22 PM by gongora »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #3 on: 11/26/2017 05:50 AM »
Launch date is 13 March.


[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #5 on: 11/28/2017 07:36 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 07:38 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jpo234

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #6 on: 11/28/2017 09:08 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

That ...thing going up to the ISS doesn't look like a Dragon at all. If anything it looks like a Cygnus...
« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 09:09 AM by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline JamesH65

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #7 on: 11/28/2017 03:52 PM »
CRS-14 will be carrying new SD cards and wireless dongle HW for the AstroPi mission. https://astro-pi.org/

Got some stuff I did going up! Hopefully....

Offline Star One

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #8 on: 11/28/2017 08:38 PM »
BBC news article and video about the RemoveDebris mission.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41973646

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #9 on: 11/29/2017 05:37 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.

Online Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #10 on: 11/30/2017 09:26 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.
The page,which shows the February date, is dated 10/14/2017, so not really up-to-date.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #11 on: 12/04/2017 11:49 AM »
Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #12 on: 12/04/2017 03:50 PM »
They found the perfect truck to take the ESA payload to the Cape  ;D

Tweet from Terma:
Quote
ASIM is ready for the CRS-14 mission to the International @Space_Station . Today ASIM left the integration facilities in Milan and is on its way to Dallas, Texas http://bit.ly/2BfLsTZ

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM released from US customs in Dallas. Picked up and en route to @NASAKennedy.

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM arrived and offloaded at @NASAKennedy. Ready for unpacking and check-out processing.

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #13 on: 12/04/2017 04:28 PM »
EnduroSat is being listed for that launch:

http://one.endurosat.com/#!/launch

This could very well be the third satellite of Bulgaria, after Bulgaria 1300 in 1981 and BulgariaSat-1 in 2016.

Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

Whoops.

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #15 on: 12/13/2017 11:17 AM »
Quote
Presents came early this year @NASAKennedy: unpacking the high-altitude thunderstorm observer @ASIM_Payload for testing – launching to @Space_Station next year. Shiny!

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/940917300353433601

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #16 on: 12/18/2017 01:34 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.  It will be delivered in a box to the ISS where it will be unpacked by the astronauts and attached to a slide table for deployment using the Japanese Experiment Module Robotic Manipulator System, developed by JAXA.   

Once in orbit the ADR experiments on board the spacecraft will be performed.  In the first of two capture experiments a net will be discharged at one of the deployed target cubesats to demonstrate net capture in space.  The second capture experiment will see a harpoon launched at a deployable target plate made of representative satellite panel materials – the first harpoon capture in orbit.  The third experiment involves vision-based navigation by deploying the second cubesat and demonstrating rendezvous navigation using cameras and a LiDaR.  Finally, the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft will deploy a large dragsail to speed de-orbit, where it will burn up as it enters Earth’s atmosphere.   

Professor Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of SSTL commented “Since the beginning of the space era, orbital debris has progressively been building up and there are now almost 7,000 tons of it around the Earth. It is now time for the international space community to begin to mitigate, limit and control space junk and I am very pleased that the RemoveDEBRIS consortium is leading the way with an innovative ADR mission which I hope will be a precursor to future operational ADR missions.” 

“This is an excellent example of what can be achieved when Industry and Academia are working together to tackle real problems” said Prof G Aglietti, Director of the Surrey Space Centre, and current Principal Investigator for the project.

The RemoveDEBRIS mission, which started in 2013 and at peak times has had more than 60 people assigned to the mission, is led by the Surrey Space Centre and draws on the expertise of some of Europe’s most prominent space companies and institutions.
 
Mission & Consortium coordination - Surrey Space Centre (UK)
Satellite system engineering - ASF (France)
Platform & Avionics – SSTL (UK)
Harpoon – Airbus (UK)
Net – Airbus (Germany)
Vision Based Navigation – CSEM (Switzerland)/INRIA/Airbus (Toulouse)
Cubesat dispensers – Innovative solutions in space (Holland)
Target cubesats – Surrey Space Centre (UK)/STE
Dragsail – Surrey Space Centre (UK)
The project is co-funded by the European Commission and the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n°607099.
 
ENDS

http://www.sstl.co.uk/Press/SSTL-ships-RemoveDEBRIS-mission-for-ISS-launch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #17 on: 12/18/2017 02:09 PM »
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.

That will not help Dragon's pressurized cargo density  :)

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #18 on: 12/27/2017 06:53 PM »
Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

Offline IanThePineapple

Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

39A will launch most/all CRS and all gov missions (including NASA and DoD) once FH-1 is off the pad and they do some pad checkouts. There might be a few commercial launches from there every now and then if a certain period of time is packed with a bunch of planned flights or if 40 is down for inspections/repairs.

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