Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion  (Read 62816 times)

Online gongora

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CRS-14 Discussion thread

NSF Threads for CRS-14 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage March-April / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-14:

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Successful launch April 2, 2018 at 1630:38 EDT/2030 UTC on Falcon 9 (reused booster 1039.2) from SLC-40.  Dragon reused from CRS-8.  Booster expended.



External cargo: ASIM, RRM3 MISSE-FF, PFCS



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section
« Last Edit: 04/03/2018 02:39 AM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #1 on: 11/24/2017 11:34 PM »
Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM)

ASIM Page at Terma (prime contractor)

http://www.asim.dk/

ASIM on Twitter
Quote
[Tweet from Nov. 24, 2017]
Passed Qualification and Acceptance Review successfully. @Terma_Global will pick-up ASIM in Tortona Monday and ship the flight model to @NASAKennedy.

[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.

ASIM is an advanced observatory to be mounted on the outside of the European Columbus module at ISS.

Once the observatory is in operation, ASIM will observe and photograph the large electrical discharges from thunder clouds in the area between the earth’s atmosphere and space – the layers called the stratosphere and mesosphere. These spectacular electrical discharges, known as red sprites, blue jets, haloes, and elves, were observed for the first time in 1989. There is great scientific interest in a closer study, and while staying at ISS in September 2015, Astronaut Andreas Mogensen made a series of spectacular recordings of the huge lightning phenomena.

The Danish technology company Terma is technical lead on the observatory, while Torsten Neubert, chief consultant at DTU Space, is scientific lead on this exciting program led by ESA in collaboration with the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI). Terma and DTU Space have both played a key role in the development of the advanced instruments included in the observatory.

"It has been an exciting challenge for Terma. This is the first time that we have been the technical main contractor on such a large space project, and thus responsible for the development and completion to the European Space Agency (ESA). With ASIM, the Danish space community has proven its expertise and the high scientific and technical level that it masters", says Carsten Jørgensen, Senior Vice President of Terma’s Space business.

According to Kristian Pedersen, Director of DTU Space, ASIM proves Danish international leadership – both within space science and technology:

"Danish space exploration is important to Denmark. With ASIM, we show that Denmark has technological and scientific competencies at a high international level, and that we at DTU, through collaboration with Danish industry, are at the forefront within important space applications. In addition, we hope that the program will help to attract more young people to studies in natural science. We need these engineers in future."

At an event at Terma in Herlev today, ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen unveiled a 1:1 model of the 314 kg observatory with a total value of DKK 350 million. Andreas Mogensen's participation in the event at Terma has been arranged in collaboration with ESA and the Danish Board of Education and Research.



« Last Edit: 11/24/2017 11:54 PM by gongora »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #2 on: 11/25/2017 12:07 AM »
[NOTE:  RRM3 seems to have moved to a later flight]

Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3)

RRM3 page at GSFC (This page has lots of pictures, animations, explanations, etc.)
Quote
Mission Overview

RRM3 builds on the first two phases of International Space Station technology demonstrations that tested tools, technologies, and techniques to refuel and repair satellites in orbit. RRM3 will demonstrate innovative methods to store, transfer and freeze standard cryogenic fluid and xenon in space.

The mission is scheduled to launch to the space station in early 2018 aboard the SpaceX Commercial Resupply Services Mission 14 (CRS-14). It has a projected two-year life on the space station, though NASA intends to accomplish RRM3's objectives within the first year. RRM3 is developed and operated by the Satellite Servicing Projects Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, under direction of NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate.

RRM3 Primary Objectives

1. Perform cryogenic liquid methane transfer
2. Perform xenon gas transfer

RRM3 Secondary Objectives

1. Maintain cryogen fluid mass for six months via zero boil-off
2. Demonstrate and validate the Compact Thermal Imager - An instrument that utilizes available room on RRM3 to observe Earth to detect smoke and fires, as well as measure crop transevaporation.
3.Complete Machine Vision Tasks -In-space assessment of fiducials (decals) with unique patterns that enhance machine vision algorithms and aid in autonomous rendezvous and tool positioning.

[NASA Apr. 3, 2017] NASA Robotic Refueling Mission Departs Station (overview of RRM program to date)

« Last Edit: 03/14/2018 06:22 PM by gongora »

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #3 on: 11/26/2017 05:50 AM »
Launch date is 13 March.


[Terma Press Release, Nov. 20, 2017]
DENMARK’S NEXT MAJOR SPACE PROJECT PREPARED FOR LAUNCH
Quote
Herlev, Denmark – Denmark's next major space project, The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM), is on its way to the U.S. to be prepared for launch from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the International Space Station (ISS). The launch date is scheduled for Tuesday, 13 March 2018, and ASIM is planned for launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #5 on: 11/28/2017 07:36 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 07:38 AM by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline jpo234

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #6 on: 11/28/2017 09:08 AM »
http://www.thedailystar.net/science/space-science/satellite-test-space-garbage-collection-methods-surrey-space-centre-removedebris-1453465
Quote
RemoveDEBRIS is due for launch in January next year.
https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

The Daily Star article indicating the January date is from 24 August, so likely out of date. Image showing launch on a Falcon 9 mission to ISS.

That ...thing going up to the ISS doesn't look like a Dragon at all. If anything it looks like a Cygnus...
« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 09:09 AM by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline JamesH65

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #7 on: 11/28/2017 03:52 PM »
CRS-14 will be carrying new SD cards and wireless dongle HW for the AstroPi mission. https://astro-pi.org/

Got some stuff I did going up! Hopefully....

Offline Star One

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #8 on: 11/28/2017 08:38 PM »
BBC news article and video about the RemoveDebris mission.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41973646

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #9 on: 11/29/2017 05:37 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #10 on: 11/30/2017 09:26 PM »
Slides from NAC HEO Committee meeting still show CRS-14 launching around Feb. 11.  External payloads shown as RRM3, ASIM, PFCS.
The page,which shows the February date, is dated 10/14/2017, so not really up-to-date.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #11 on: 12/04/2017 11:49 AM »
Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #12 on: 12/04/2017 03:50 PM »
They found the perfect truck to take the ESA payload to the Cape  ;D

Tweet from Terma:
Quote
ASIM is ready for the CRS-14 mission to the International @Space_Station . Today ASIM left the integration facilities in Milan and is on its way to Dallas, Texas http://bit.ly/2BfLsTZ

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM released from US customs in Dallas. Picked up and en route to @NASAKennedy.

Tweet from ASIM:
Quote
ASIM arrived and offloaded at @NASAKennedy. Ready for unpacking and check-out processing.

Offline Svetoslav

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #13 on: 12/04/2017 04:28 PM »
EnduroSat is being listed for that launch:

http://one.endurosat.com/#!/launch

This could very well be the third satellite of Bulgaria, after Bulgaria 1300 in 1981 and BulgariaSat-1 in 2016.

Online rory

Quote
Last week @ASIM_Payload – the red sprites, blue jets & elves hunter – was shipped to @NASAKennedy from #Frankfurt. Launching next year to @Space_Station it will monitor what happens above thunderstorms from space: ⛈️⚡ http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/937660093784625152

Whoops.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #15 on: 12/13/2017 11:17 AM »
Quote
Presents came early this year @NASAKennedy: unpacking the high-altitude thunderstorm observer @ASIM_Payload for testing – launching to @Space_Station next year. Shiny!

http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Atmosphere_Space_Interactions_Monitor

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/940917300353433601

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #16 on: 12/18/2017 01:34 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.  It will be delivered in a box to the ISS where it will be unpacked by the astronauts and attached to a slide table for deployment using the Japanese Experiment Module Robotic Manipulator System, developed by JAXA.   

Once in orbit the ADR experiments on board the spacecraft will be performed.  In the first of two capture experiments a net will be discharged at one of the deployed target cubesats to demonstrate net capture in space.  The second capture experiment will see a harpoon launched at a deployable target plate made of representative satellite panel materials – the first harpoon capture in orbit.  The third experiment involves vision-based navigation by deploying the second cubesat and demonstrating rendezvous navigation using cameras and a LiDaR.  Finally, the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft will deploy a large dragsail to speed de-orbit, where it will burn up as it enters Earth’s atmosphere.   

Professor Sir Martin Sweeting, Executive Chairman of SSTL commented “Since the beginning of the space era, orbital debris has progressively been building up and there are now almost 7,000 tons of it around the Earth. It is now time for the international space community to begin to mitigate, limit and control space junk and I am very pleased that the RemoveDEBRIS consortium is leading the way with an innovative ADR mission which I hope will be a precursor to future operational ADR missions.” 

“This is an excellent example of what can be achieved when Industry and Academia are working together to tackle real problems” said Prof G Aglietti, Director of the Surrey Space Centre, and current Principal Investigator for the project.

The RemoveDEBRIS mission, which started in 2013 and at peak times has had more than 60 people assigned to the mission, is led by the Surrey Space Centre and draws on the expertise of some of Europe’s most prominent space companies and institutions.
 
Mission & Consortium coordination - Surrey Space Centre (UK)
Satellite system engineering - ASF (France)
Platform & Avionics – SSTL (UK)
Harpoon – Airbus (UK)
Net – Airbus (Germany)
Vision Based Navigation – CSEM (Switzerland)/INRIA/Airbus (Toulouse)
Cubesat dispensers – Innovative solutions in space (Holland)
Target cubesats – Surrey Space Centre (UK)/STE
Dragsail – Surrey Space Centre (UK)
The project is co-funded by the European Commission and the research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n°607099.
 
ENDS

http://www.sstl.co.uk/Press/SSTL-ships-RemoveDEBRIS-mission-for-ISS-launch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #17 on: 12/18/2017 02:09 PM »
The RemoveDEBRIS satellite platform was designed and manufactured by SSTL in Guildford UK, and will fly four space debris removal technologies and two target cubesats.  The platform, which is approximately one metre cubed, has a flight mass of less than 100kg and is due to be the largest satellite deployed from the ISS to date.

That will not help Dragon's pressurized cargo density  :)

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #18 on: 12/27/2017 06:53 PM »
Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

Online IanThePineapple

Is there any indication which pad this will launch from?  The manifest has this and TESS launching a week apart. Is 39A being used for regular launches once FH is off the pad?

39A will launch most/all CRS and all gov missions (including NASA and DoD) once FH-1 is off the pad and they do some pad checkouts. There might be a few commercial launches from there every now and then if a certain period of time is packed with a bunch of planned flights or if 40 is down for inspections/repairs.

Offline mn

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #20 on: 12/27/2017 07:26 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #21 on: 12/27/2017 10:19 PM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
« Last Edit: 12/27/2017 10:20 PM by Lars-J »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #22 on: 12/28/2017 06:31 AM »
They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.

Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #23 on: 12/28/2017 08:52 AM »
As a general question, now that they have two east coast pads. (perhaps this belongs in the manifest thread?)

How far in advance do they need to know which pad a particular mission would use? can that be decided in the last couple of weeks when they do the vehicle integration to the TEL? or are there reasons why it needs to be known earlier?

Does payload processing/fairing integration need to know which pad before it begins? or can any payload easily move to either HIF after processing?

Zuma is your answer. (was going to be 39A, is now using 40)

They can be flexible. Only FH and Crew launches require 39A - everything else can be shifted between the pads on pretty short (weeks) notice.
The real answer is that it very much depends on their licensing situation for launches from the FL pads.  Zuma is a bad general example for switching because the end-user for that payload is USG (presumably for defense/intel).  So, while the launch was being treated as a commercial launch for licensing, the speed with which it was able to get a new license for a launch from SLC-40 is not at all indicative of what is "normal". 

It likely won't matter at all for GTO launches because SpaceX should have licenses for both pads that will cover multiple launches of that type without a need to specify the specific payload/mission.  The challenge would only be for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another because with the exception of Iridium or CRS launches, SpaceX hasn't gotten licenses that allow for multiple launches to LEO.  The advantage for GTO is that they are all launching on a 90deg. azimuth whereas for LEO each launch is going to a different inclination and so launches on a different azimuth. 

My guess is that for moving a LEO launch from one pad to another will require at least 60 days for new licensing. 
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

Offline speedevil

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #24 on: 12/28/2017 11:23 AM »
Based on Gwynne Shotwell’s testimony to the National Space council in October, it seems getting the FAA launch license updated is one of the limiting factors currently (although hopefully moves are afoot to improve that).

From memory, it was asked that she and others supply actual proposals for change with a deadline that has passed by now.
I wonder if these are public yet.


Offline Yeknom-Ecaps

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #26 on: 01/06/2018 10:16 PM »
Quote
Mon, 18 Dec 2017
SSTL ships RemoveDEBRIS mission for ISS launch

Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has shipped the RemoveDEBRIS spacecraft to the Kennedy Space Center in Florida for launch to the International Space Station (ISS) inside a Dragon capsule on board the SpaceX CRS-14 re-supply mission, a service provided through supply agent, Nanoracks.  RemoveDEBRIS is an Active Debris Removal (ADR) demonstration mission led by the Surrey Space Centre at the University of Surrey and co-funded by the European Commission and partners. 
 


Has RemoveDEBRIS arrived at KSC? If so, when? Any photos?
« Last Edit: 01/06/2018 11:16 PM by Yeknom-Ecaps »

Offline brujhar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #27 on: 01/11/2018 11:58 PM »
Hello guys,

Do you know the exact launch date of this mission?
I read on some sites that it would be on 03/13/2018 at 00:00 a.m.
 
Thank you

Offline ZachS09

http://www.launchphotography.com/Delta_4_Atlas_5_Falcon_9_Launch_Viewing.html

SpX-14 will launch on March 5, 2018 at either 06:00 UTC or 07:00 UTC (1 AM Eastern or 2 AM Eastern).
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #29 on: 01/12/2018 01:10 AM »
With CRS missions I wouldn't count on a particular date staying the same for the next two months.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #30 on: 01/16/2018 03:52 PM »
The SpaceflightNow schedule shows this moving to April 2.

Online vaporcobra

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #31 on: 01/24/2018 12:10 AM »
A hefty delay, although very likely a symptom of ISS scheduling instead of SpaceX schedule movement.

Also, crossposting from the Manifest thread:

Confirmation that 1382 is CRS-14, NET March 5, and includes a recovery attempt onshore (LZ-1).

https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=81987&RequestTimeout=1000
https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/els/reports/STA_Print.cfm?mode=current&application_seq=81985&RequestTimeout=1000

The NET is of course now outdated, according to SpaceflightNow.

Offline cuddihy

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #32 on: 01/27/2018 06:18 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?

Online IanThePineapple

So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?

I think it goes up on CRS-16

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #34 on: 01/27/2018 06:34 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?
I think it goes up on CRS-16

Yes, Spaceflight 101's ISS Calendar shows it being installed in December, during SpX/CRS-16's visit.  They don't give a source, but I assume they are working from the ISS FPIP.

Edit: Is there a recent public source (beyond SF101's calendar) for IDA-3 being on the SpX/CRS-16 manifest?
SpaceNews, 16 July 2016:
Quote
NASA is developing a third IDA to replace the one lost in last year’s launch failure. That third adapter is tentatively scheduled to launch on SpaceX’s CRS-16 cargo mission in 2018, said Kirk Shireman, NASA ISS program manager, during a July 13 briefing at the ISS Research and Development Conference in San Diego.
The stand down following Amos-6 could have delayed SpaceX CRS missions sufficiently for it to have been scheduled at some point on CRS-14 (was it?), but other issues may have shifted it back to CRS-16.
« Last Edit: 01/27/2018 07:13 PM by kdhilliard »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #35 on: 01/27/2018 07:28 PM »
IDA takes the whole trunk.  We know there are other external payloads scheduled on SpX-14 and SpX-15.

Offline catdlr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #36 on: 02/04/2018 11:56 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQtSSyu175A?t=001

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Offline Svetoslav

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #37 on: 02/09/2018 08:01 AM »
EnduroSat is being moved from this flight to Cygnus on may.

Offline Roy_H

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #38 on: 02/09/2018 06:50 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.
"If we don't achieve re-usability, I will consider SpaceX to be a failure." - Elon Musk

Offline sewebster

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #39 on: 02/09/2018 07:20 PM »
This Satellite Might Be The Solution To Space Junk


Tech Insider
Published on Feb 4, 2018

There is an estimated 7,000 tons of junk orbiting the Earth. The Surray Space Center wants to clean it up, so they designed a satellite called RemoveDebris. It will test cheap methods of picking up litter in space. The satellite will go up into space and deploy artificial space junk. It can use nets or harpoons to capture the junk. Finally, the satellite will enter Earth's atmosphere and while it's dragged down the junk will burn up. Where does space debris come from? Debris comes from old bits of rocket, disused satellites, or debris from collisions. Space debris is a major threat to space assets. The Internet, GPS, and weather tracking all use satellites and RemoveDebris could keep them same from junk.

What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.

Well, two separate problems... rendezvous, and dealing with the junk when you get there... adds significantly complexity to include rendezvous if you are just trying to validate the second step...

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #40 on: 02/09/2018 07:30 PM »
What? Its going to take up its own junk? Seems like a pretty lame test, the challenge it to capture fast-moving junk in orbit, all this does is show that they can take something up and de-orbit burning in the atmosphere. This is done routinely with every launch upper stage.
One step at a time.  RemoveDEBRIS has no propulsion.  Safety issues would make it nigh-impossible to keep something with propulsion inside the ISS.

Also, there are other missions that have tested noncooperative rendezvous.  RemoveDEBRIS is mostly testing technologies for what to do after the rendezvous.

1. Net: Deploy a CubeSat and then hit it with a net at 7m distance.
2. Vision Based Navigation: Deploy another CubeSat and image it using a camera and LIDAR.
3. Harpoon: Hit a target at a range of 1.5m.
4. Dragsail: An inflatable dragsail is included on the main platform.

https://www.surrey.ac.uk/surrey-space-centre/missions/removedebris

Offline Greg Hullender

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #41 on: 02/11/2018 03:32 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #42 on: 02/11/2018 04:21 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?
I assume the above poster meant 'inside the safety envelope of ISS' rather than actually inside ISS.

Even something that can only achieve 1m/s can bang into stuff or get wedged in parts of ISS structure and damage things.
'proving' it's safe would be very hard indeed.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #43 on: 02/11/2018 04:42 PM »
Wouldn't an ion engine be safe inside the ISS?
I assume the above poster meant 'inside the safety envelope of ISS' rather than actually inside ISS.

Even something that can only achieve 1m/s can bang into stuff or get wedged in parts of ISS structure and damage things.
'proving' it's safe would be very hard indeed.

Was just about to post that plus the question of whether an ion drive even works in 1 atmosphere...  why bring it inside?
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Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #44 on: 02/11/2018 06:03 PM »
Maybe I misunderstood, but I thought the comment was about someone stating that this payload was moved from a Dragon resupply flight to a Cygnus flight.  And since this would make it pressurized cargo (needing to spend at least some amount of time inside both Cygnus and ISS, which are both fully "inside" in that context) it would then have to be moved outside somehow if it is to be deployed outside.

This is based on my understanding that Cygnus does not offer unpressurized cargo, as Dragon does, and that the comment about changes to manifest was referring to the debris mitigation test system.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #45 on: 02/11/2018 09:44 PM »
The comment about a payload moving involved a 1U cubesat. Both Cygnus and Dragon bring up cubesats as pressurized cargo all the time.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #46 on: 02/12/2018 09:49 AM »
One step at a time.  RemoveDEBRIS has no propulsion.  Safety issues would make it nigh-impossible to keep something with propulsion inside the ISS.

Here's what NanoRacks' Kaber Deployer payload guide(.pdf) says:

Quote
4.5.9 Propulsion System

The propulsion system will need to be assessed for hazard potential.  NanoRacks will assist in the identification of hazards.  Mechanical hazards may be related to pressure containment, flow containment, leakage, etc.  Systems may also have hazard potential if inadvertent operation of the propulsion system in or around ISS could be catastrophic or critical.  Depending on hazard potential, both mechanical and electrical fault tolerance may be required.   Systems with toxic propellant may not be allowed onboard ISS but might be approvable if outside ISS.  Propellants with explosive potential may not be approvable.  Acceptable propellant type must be coordinated with NanoRacks and documented in the ICA.

Other sections talk about the necessary inhibits for interior payloads, etc.  So, having a fueled propulsion system on your satellite while it is still inside the ISS is perfectly possible depending on design.
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February 15, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-032
NASA Invites Media to Upcoming Space Station Cargo Launch


Media accreditation now is open for the launch of the next SpaceX delivery of supplies and equipment, including science investigations, to the International Space Station, currently targeted for no earlier than April.

A Dragon cargo spacecraft, previously flown on SpaceX’s eighth commercial resupply mission to the station for NASA, will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida.

Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at CCAFS and NASA’s neighboring Kennedy Space Center. Credentialing deadlines are as follows:

    International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4:30 p.m. EST Thursday, March 1, for access to CCAFS or 4:30 p.m. Monday, March 19, for access to Kennedy media activities only.
    U.S. media must apply by 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 23.


Highlights of space station research that will be facilitated by Dragon’s arrival are:

    The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, an Earth observatory that will study severe thunderstorms and their role in the Earth’s atmosphere and climate.
    An investigation that seeks to better understand how the lack of gravity affects a process used to produce high-performance products from metal powders. This research could lead to improved manufacturing techniques.
    Continuing research on growing food in space, as the Veggie Passive Orbital Nutrient Delivery System experiment tests a new way to deliver nutrients to plants.

Among the cargo that will enable National Laboratory research, which is managed by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, is a platform that will enable testing of materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, and investigations into the process of antibiotic release and technology for the evaluation of drug safety and effectiveness.

This is the 14th SpaceX mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract.

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and makes research breakthroughs not possible on Earth. The space station has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, more than 220 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

For launch countdown coverage, NASA's launch blog, and more information about the mission, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #48 on: 02/15/2018 11:48 PM »
Among the cargo that will enable National Laboratory research, which is managed by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, is a platform that will enable testing of materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space

Did the external payloads change, or is this something going up in the pressurized cargo?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #49 on: 02/16/2018 02:54 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #50 on: 02/16/2018 03:03 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home


ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/09/2018
 
Robonaut: The crew prepared and stowed Robonaut in preparation for return on SpaceX-14. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.
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Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #51 on: 02/20/2018 02:22 PM »
https://twitter.com/ASIM_Payload/status/965952257891229697
Quote
April 2nd #CRS14 instant launch window to ISS is at 20:30 UTC, i.e. 22:30 CEST in Europe and 16:30 EDT at Kennedy Space Center.

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Offline IntoTheVoid

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #53 on: 02/24/2018 02:59 PM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home


ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/09/2018
 
Robonaut: The crew prepared and stowed Robonaut in preparation for return on SpaceX-14. Robonaut is a humanoid robot designed with the versatility and dexterity to manipulate hardware, work in high risk environments, and respond safely to unexpected obstacles. It is comprised of a torso with two arms and a head, and two legs with end effectors that enable the robot to translate inside the ISS by interfacing with handrails and seat tracks.

 I don't understand why they would consider sending the one off model back rather than one of the newer model quintuplets.
In either case, it sounds like a return trip would be perfect for one of the Commercial Crew Demo flights. Strap him in.

Offline Asteroza

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #54 on: 02/26/2018 06:44 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #55 on: 02/26/2018 06:58 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

What makes you say that? Would be pretty sad to see it go to waste :(

Offline Lar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #56 on: 02/26/2018 11:44 PM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

What makes you say that? Would be pretty sad to see it go to waste :(
Strip away the NASA PR and what exactly did it accomplish? Might have missed that but...
"I think it would be great to be born on Earth and to die on Mars. Just hopefully not at the point of impact." -Elon Musk
"We're a little bit like the dog who caught the bus" - Musk after CRS-8 S1 successfully landed on ASDS OCISLY

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Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

What makes you say that? Would be pretty sad to see it go to waste :(
Strip away the NASA PR and what exactly did it accomplish? Might have missed that but...

Yeah, I never understood the point of it. I totally forgot about it for like 2-3 years until a few days back.

Offline archae86

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #58 on: 02/26/2018 11:58 PM »
Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...
I got "inside whisper" information that it had a battery safety problem that was unlikely to get solved to NASA's satisfaction, and thus it was not likely to get used in the future.  I heard the whisper months ago, but believe the underlying information was years old at that point.  It is possible that the whisper referred to some other piece of station hardware, but I suspect it was this one.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #59 on: 02/27/2018 12:16 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

What makes you say that? Would be pretty sad to see it go to waste :(
Strip away the NASA PR and what exactly did it accomplish? Might have missed that but...

Robonaut basically broke down weeks after it was launched to the ISS and has very, very infrequently undergone unsuccessful repair attempts in the years since. Just a wall decoration at this point. Not really sure why it existed in the first place, but it really never had even a slight chance to do whatever it was supposed or hope to do
« Last Edit: 02/27/2018 12:17 AM by vaporcobra »

Offline the_other_Doug

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #60 on: 02/27/2018 01:17 AM »
Unrelated, but I'd bet that CRS-14 will be tasked with returning Robonaut to Earth for repairs. https://spectrum.ieee.org/automaton/robotics/space-robots/robonaut-has-been-broken-for-years-and-now-nasa-is-bringing-it-home

Doubt Robonaut will get a chance to ride back up on Dragon, so I guess it's goodbye...

What makes you say that? Would be pretty sad to see it go to waste :(
Strip away the NASA PR and what exactly did it accomplish? Might have missed that but...

Robonaut basically broke down weeks after it was launched to the ISS and has very, very infrequently undergone unsuccessful repair attempts in the years since. Just a wall decoration at this point. Not really sure why it existed in the first place, but it really never had even a slight chance to do whatever it was supposed or hope to do

It always seemed to me like several different groups were approaching the same problems -- such as how to manipulate objects outside the station -- from different directions.

Primary means has been EVA, use suited astronauts to the best of their gloved hands' abilities.  But EVA is risky, certainly riskier than bouncing around inside the tin cans.  So, is there any way to do the things we've been doing via EVA without sending the crew outside?

One group developed DEXTRE, to try and do fine manipulation with an advanced arm end-effector.  Another group developed Robonaut, who has the same style of manual dexterity as a human's and can be controlled directly by human hands.

As of now, while DEXTRE is somewhat effective, neither it nor Robonaut has proven successful to the extent that EVA can be done away with.  And to be honest, Robonaut would never have done EVA in place of humans, it was a demo model, to see if it would work at all.

So, it looks like people in suits are still going to be called upon to effect repairs and such outside, on long voyages.
-Doug  (With my shield, not yet upon it)

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #61 on: 02/27/2018 02:22 AM »
So, it looks like people in suits are still going to be called upon to effect repairs and such outside, on long voyages.

Precisely. At least so long as NASA is the one tasked with developing robotic EVA equipment...

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #62 on: 02/27/2018 05:50 AM »
Well, the article that was originally mentioned in this thread says that Robonaut broke down when they tried to add the legs (because of issues with the upgrade). So while there may be other issues and limitations it kinda seems like that was why they stopped using it?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #63 on: 02/27/2018 01:53 PM »
Well, the article that was originally mentioned in this thread says that Robonaut broke down when they tried to add the legs (because of issues with the upgrade). So while there may be other issues and limitations it kinda seems like that was why they stopped using it?

Why did it need legs... in space?
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Offline eeergo

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #64 on: 02/27/2018 01:56 PM »
Well, the article that was originally mentioned in this thread says that Robonaut broke down when they tried to add the legs (because of issues with the upgrade). So while there may be other issues and limitations it kinda seems like that was why they stopped using it?

Why did it need legs... in space?

To attach itself to structure while having two hands for dexterity.

Another solutions could of course be devised, but the whole advertised point of Robonaut was to use an anthropomorphic figure in order to better utilize ISS' external interfaces, which were designed for human use (although, as we know, not so much for using both hands and feet at the same time, so the whole point of Robonaut was a bit dubious at best).
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #65 on: 02/27/2018 03:27 PM »
Well, the article that was originally mentioned in this thread says that Robonaut broke down when they tried to add the legs (because of issues with the upgrade). So while there may be other issues and limitations it kinda seems like that was why they stopped using it?
Why did it need legs... in space?
To attach itself to structure while having two hands for dexterity.

Another solutions could of course be devised, but the whole advertised point of Robonaut was to use an anthropomorphic figure in order to better utilize ISS' external interfaces, which were designed for human use (although, as we know, not so much for using both hands and feet at the same time, so the whole point of Robonaut was a bit dubious at best).

Robonaut's "snake legs" were a pleasant departure from its otherwise anthropomorphic design.  As this article (with video) says, "These legs are not for walking".

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #66 on: 03/05/2018 12:56 PM »
https://twitter.com/ASIM_Payload/status/970582752004362240
Quote
Preparations for #CRS14 launch are on-going. One week from now, March 12, @ASIM_Payload is going into the Dragon trunk at @SpaceX  PPF, Cape Canaveral. Payload preps will be done March 9.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #67 on: 03/07/2018 01:21 PM »
[The Costa Rica Star] First Costa Rican Satellite will be Launched April 2
Quote
Costa Rica will launch on April 2 its first satellite to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral, Florida, U.S.A.

This initiative known as Irazu Project ... was designed to help with different environmental investigations.
...
Since February 21 the device was delivered to the Japanese Agency for Aerospace Exploration (JAXA) which will be in charge of sending it to space together with other satellites and the supply equipment for the International Space Station (ISS) on April 2.

American company SpaceX is in charge of the launching, which will be done with the famous rocket Falcon 9.
« Last Edit: 03/07/2018 01:22 PM by gongora »

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #68 on: 03/07/2018 01:28 PM »
UBAKUSAT too.
The cubesats Ubakusat and Ibazu will be deployed by J-SSOD during EC-55.
Launch could be on SpX-14.
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/news/180228_ubakusat.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/news/180228_irazu.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
Launch in April confirmed.
https://twitter.com/JAXA_Kiboriyo/status/970582130408304640
Google translation
Quote
Ultra small satellite made by Turkey and Costa Rica was handed over to JAXA!
The satellite "UBAKUSAT" in Turkey is released from "Kibo" as part of a cooperative agreement on use of "Kibo" concluded between Turkey Transportation Maritime Communications Department and # JAXA in September 2016.
Costa Rica's satellite is the first satellite of Costa Rica, with the name "Irazu", cooperated with Kyushu Institute of Technology. The two satellites will be transported to the ISS around April and will be released during # Kanai astronaut 's stay.

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #69 on: 03/07/2018 01:52 PM »
And also 1KUNS-PF.
http://global.jaxa.jp/press/2018/01/20180119_kibocube.html?utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter
Quote
Deployment Schedule, 1KUNS-PF
January 16, 2018: 1KUNS-PF handed over to JAXA
Around March 2018: launch to the ISS
Spring timeframe 2018: deployment from Kibo with a robotic arm

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #70 on: 03/12/2018 07:19 AM »
https://twitter.com/ASIM_Payload/status/972927879196508160
Quote
@ASIM_Payload is in the #CRS14 Dragon Trunk. Secured and continuity on the heater connectors. Thanks @SpaceX. Great work. We are go for launch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #71 on: 03/12/2018 03:54 PM »
Quote
After a busy weekend, our #SpaceStormHunter is GO for launch on April 2 🚀 The 314 kg of the @ASIM_Payload are now sitting inside @SpaceX's #CRS14 Dragon at Cape Canaveral. All connections looking good! 👍
asim.dk/payload.php

https://twitter.com/esaspaceflight/status/973223552584306688?s=21

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #72 on: 03/12/2018 04:30 PM »
So Dragon is being mated to the second stage in the SPIF?  Or is this just an adapter mate?  Or have I mis-interpreted and this is in the spacecraft addition at SLC 40?

 - Ed Kyle

Looks like the full stage (CRS-3):

« Last Edit: 03/12/2018 04:32 PM by jpo234 »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #73 on: 03/12/2018 04:35 PM »
So Dragon is being mated to the second stage in the SPIF?  Or is this just an adapter mate?  Or have I mis-interpreted and this is in the spacecraft addition at SLC 40?

 - Ed Kyle

I think the picture with Dragon in it is an older picture.  They're certainly not integrating it yet, the CRS-14 LV hasn't been through the static fire yet.
« Last Edit: 03/12/2018 04:37 PM by deruch »
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #74 on: 03/12/2018 04:42 PM »
File photo or fit check would be my guess.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #76 on: 03/14/2018 05:03 PM »
    Stephanie Murphy and Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance – Murphy, founder of Alpha Space, and Gittleman, the company’s president and chief executive officer, will discuss Alpha Space’s Materials International Space Station Experiment flight facility (MISSE-FF). MISSE will be permanently installed on the exterior of the orbiting laboratory and provide the ability to test materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, with flight opportunities for experimenters approximately every six months. Testing on MISSE may benefit a variety of industries, including advanced manufacturing of products ranging from protective clothing for astronauts to solar cells.
    Kim de Groh, NASA’s Glenn Research Center – De Groh, a senior materials research engineer, will talk about how exposing 138 polymer and composite samples to the space environment, via MISSE-FF, will provide critical data to improve predictions of materials durability for spacecraft and component lifetimes in low-Earth orbit.
 
This suggest that MISSE-FF 1 will fly on SpX-14.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #77 on: 03/14/2018 05:14 PM »
    Stephanie Murphy and Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance – Murphy, founder of Alpha Space, and Gittleman, the company’s president and chief executive officer, will discuss Alpha Space’s Materials International Space Station Experiment flight facility (MISSE-FF). MISSE will be permanently installed on the exterior of the orbiting laboratory and provide the ability to test materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, with flight opportunities for experimenters approximately every six months. Testing on MISSE may benefit a variety of industries, including advanced manufacturing of products ranging from protective clothing for astronauts to solar cells.
    Kim de Groh, NASA’s Glenn Research Center – De Groh, a senior materials research engineer, will talk about how exposing 138 polymer and composite samples to the space environment, via MISSE-FF, will provide critical data to improve predictions of materials durability for spacecraft and component lifetimes in low-Earth orbit.
 
This suggest that MISSE-FF 1 will fly on SpX-14.

Did RRM3 move to a later flight?

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #78 on: 03/14/2018 05:17 PM »
    Stephanie Murphy and Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance – Murphy, founder of Alpha Space, and Gittleman, the company’s president and chief executive officer, will discuss Alpha Space’s Materials International Space Station Experiment flight facility (MISSE-FF). MISSE will be permanently installed on the exterior of the orbiting laboratory and provide the ability to test materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, with flight opportunities for experimenters approximately every six months. Testing on MISSE may benefit a variety of industries, including advanced manufacturing of products ranging from protective clothing for astronauts to solar cells.
    Kim de Groh, NASA’s Glenn Research Center – De Groh, a senior materials research engineer, will talk about how exposing 138 polymer and composite samples to the space environment, via MISSE-FF, will provide critical data to improve predictions of materials durability for spacecraft and component lifetimes in low-Earth orbit.
 
This suggest that MISSE-FF 1 will fly on SpX-14.

Did RRM3 move to a later flight?
RRM3 or the PFCS.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #79 on: 03/14/2018 05:48 PM »
    Stephanie Murphy and Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance – Murphy, founder of Alpha Space, and Gittleman, the company’s president and chief executive officer, will discuss Alpha Space’s Materials International Space Station Experiment flight facility (MISSE-FF). MISSE will be permanently installed on the exterior of the orbiting laboratory and provide the ability to test materials, coatings, and components in the harsh environment of space, with flight opportunities for experimenters approximately every six months. Testing on MISSE may benefit a variety of industries, including advanced manufacturing of products ranging from protective clothing for astronauts to solar cells.
    Kim de Groh, NASA’s Glenn Research Center – De Groh, a senior materials research engineer, will talk about how exposing 138 polymer and composite samples to the space environment, via MISSE-FF, will provide critical data to improve predictions of materials durability for spacecraft and component lifetimes in low-Earth orbit.
 
This suggest that MISSE-FF 1 will fly on SpX-14.

Did RRM3 move to a later flight?
RRM3 or the PFCS.
RRM3

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #80 on: 03/14/2018 06:14 PM »
There is a MISSE-FF overview in the CRS-13 thread if anyone isn't already familiar with it:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1707908#msg1707908

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #82 on: 03/27/2018 07:11 PM »
With Iridium slipping to Sat 3/31, let's preempt a few questions:
1. Odds of this effecting CRS-14 = Almost no chance
2. Station will take priority for Visiting Vehicle schedule
3. 2 days btw 2 launches is totally doable.

Offline rosbif73

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #83 on: 03/28/2018 11:04 AM »
With Iridium slipping to Sat 3/31, let's preempt a few questions:
1. Odds of this effecting CRS-14 = Almost no chance
2. Station will take priority for Visiting Vehicle schedule
3. 2 days btw 2 launches is totally doable.

Sorry to be pedantic, but:

Odds of this effecting (i.e. performing) CRS-14 = zero!
Odds of this affecting (i.e. having an effect on) CRS-14...

Offline drnscr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Updates
« Reply #84 on: 03/28/2018 11:46 PM »
I know it’s an optical illusion but it sure looked like vehicles were awfully close to the pad during the static fire

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #85 on: 03/29/2018 07:18 PM »
M1382 CRS-14 Launch Hazard Areas visualization based on issued NOTMAR and NOTAMs.

Green launch hazard area A doesn't include LZ-1 this time.
Orange landing/splashdown area B is relatively far away compare to previous CRS missions.
Despite the FCC application referring to LZ-1 recovery, this is apparently expendable mission for block4 B1039.2.

If this is indeed expendable it will be the sixth mission in a row that expended a booster (5 of the 6 intentionally  :)) )

Offline ZachS09

Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #87 on: 03/29/2018 08:46 PM »
Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.
I feel that same.  Isn't that amazing?
Space is not Highlander.  There can, and will, be more than one.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Updates
« Reply #88 on: 03/29/2018 08:56 PM »
I know it’s an optical illusion but it sure looked like vehicles were awfully close to the pad during the static fire

Yeah, I was curious and looked it up: The vehicles are 4 miles (6.5 km) from the pad while the camera is located 10 miles (16 km) away  :)

Offline ZachS09

Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.
I feel that same.  Isn't that amazing?

It ain't amazing. It's more like redundant and annoying.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #90 on: 03/29/2018 09:59 PM »
Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.
I feel that same.  Isn't that amazing?

It ain't amazing. It's more like redundant and annoying.

Think of it from SpaceX's standpoint...  cost of doing business for a day...
It's cheaper to give the soon to be outdated stages a Viking funeral... then it is to recover and chop them up...
Soon enough... they will be back to the "new normal" of recovering every one they can... no worries...  :)
« Last Edit: 03/29/2018 10:00 PM by John Alan »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #91 on: 03/30/2018 01:01 AM »
Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.
I feel that same.  Isn't that amazing?

It ain't amazing. It's more like redundant and annoying.
I bet they'd recover them for you if you brought a big enough check...and a trailer. ;)

Offline Don S

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #92 on: 03/30/2018 04:37 AM »
Even though SpaceX expends their boosters for a reason, I'm getting sick and tired of them doing "expendable" missions rather than landing the boosters.

It seems that they are now going to recover tomorrows launch, which is nice.

I feel the same way, when they can recover on some missions, the boosters should be recovered instead of dropping somewhat randomly into the ocean.  It would be sweet to see them at all of their facilities entrances... 

These Boosters I feel are going to be pieces of History.

Offline penguin44

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #93 on: 03/30/2018 05:03 AM »
Are you sure? According to the other thread it's now an expendable launch. Huh. I don't know what is what now!

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #94 on: 03/30/2018 05:13 AM »
I should be precise, by "tomorrow" I meant Iridium 5 NEXT flight 5 : March 30, 2018

Iridium5 Falcon is vertical.


The picture shows the Grid fins and legs mounted.   Sorry the picture did not come over with the quote.

NRC Quest already reached northern part of appropriate hazard area "destination LZ 005" and is waiting in this "landing zone" for B1041.2 splashdown.
High Speed Fairing Boat Mr.Steven is heading to southern part of area.

Also reports of NRC Quest on station.
« Last Edit: 03/30/2018 05:16 AM by Don S »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #95 on: 03/30/2018 06:11 AM »
I should be precise, by "tomorrow" I meant Iridium 5 NEXT flight 5 : March 30, 2018

Iridium5 Falcon is vertical.


The picture shows the Grid fins and legs mounted.   Sorry the picture did not come over with the quote.

NRC Quest already reached northern part of appropriate hazard area "destination LZ 005" and is waiting in this "landing zone" for B1041.2 splashdown.
High Speed Fairing Boat Mr.Steven is heading to southern part of area.

Also reports of NRC Quest on station.

Right.  All of that is true, but the West Coast ASDS is not on station and won't be leaving the dock in Los Angeles.  So, no recovery of Iridium 5.  What they are doing is continuing their reentry/landing testing over the water and using a forward stationed NRC Quest to receive telemetry data (otherwise the landing would be over the horizon from ground stations) and observe.  Mr. Steven will be further downrange to attempt recovery of the fairing half.  This is the same thing they did on the previous Iridium launch that wasn't recovered but also had legs and grid fins on it. 

As this thread is about CRS-14, any further discussion or questions about the Iridium-5 launch should be done in the appropriate thread: 
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=44634.0
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #96 on: 03/31/2018 12:57 AM »
There is a MISSE-FF overview in the CRS-13 thread if anyone isn't already familiar with it:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1707908#msg1707908

Alas none of this gives a mass for MISSE-FF.  Total external cargo is 926 kg per the mission overgview.
ASIM is 314 kg per their website. PFCS is 111 kg although it presumably has a FRAM as well, usually about
45 kg I believe.  That would leave 456 kg from MISSE-FF which seems on the high side.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #97 on: 03/31/2018 01:32 AM »
There is a MISSE-FF overview in the CRS-13 thread if anyone isn't already familiar with it:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1707908#msg1707908

Alas none of this gives a mass for MISSE-FF.  Total external cargo is 926 kg per the mission overgview.
ASIM is 314 kg per their website. PFCS is 111 kg although it presumably has a FRAM as well, usually about
45 kg I believe.  That would leave 456 kg from MISSE-FF which seems on the high side.

Here is another data point, may help if you have the final numbers from CRS-13
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1754318#msg1754318

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #98 on: 03/31/2018 12:32 PM »
There is a MISSE-FF overview in the CRS-13 thread if anyone isn't already familiar with it:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1707908#msg1707908

Alas none of this gives a mass for MISSE-FF.  Total external cargo is 926 kg per the mission overgview.
ASIM is 314 kg per their website. PFCS is 111 kg although it presumably has a FRAM as well, usually about
45 kg I believe.  That would leave 456 kg from MISSE-FF which seems on the high side.

The original planned NASA SpX-13 unpressurized payload mass (as shown in the ISS planning doc gongora linked) including MISSE-FF: 1080 kg 

The actual flown mass of the unpressurized payload mass of SpX-13 (once MISSE-FF was dropped from the manifest):  645 kg

Which suggests that the mass was about 435 kg (not sure if an empty passive FRAM was left in the trunk when it was dropped, so that mass may need to be further adjusted).  But, they were planning to launch with a certain number of the sample carrier slots already filled (7 on SpX-13).  So, if you're interested in strictly the Flight Facility and not including any of the sample carriers and samples' mass, it will be less.  If you're just interested in the launching mass of the whole experiment in launch configuration then it's probably pretty good.  Though it may be minorly different from the launch configuration mass on SpX-14 because the number of filled slots during launch will likely be different.  The number of filled slots is determined by trunk packing geometry and separations to the other trunk cargo.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #99 on: 03/31/2018 01:33 PM »

Which suggests that the mass was about 435 kg (not sure if an empty passive FRAM was left in the trunk when it was dropped, so that mass may need to be further adjusted).  But, they were planning to launch with a certain number of the sample carrier slots already filled (7 on SpX-13).  So, if you're interested in strictly the Flight Facility and not including any of the sample carriers and samples' mass, it will be less.  If you're just interested in the launching mass of the whole experiment in launch configuration then it's probably pretty good.  Though it may be minorly different from the launch configuration mass on SpX-14 because the number of filled slots during launch will likely be different.  The number of filled slots is determined by trunk packing geometry and separations to the other trunk cargo.
If I understand this correctly, the MISSE-FF will be launched with empty slots, and the first five MSC will be installed by SSRMS shortly after arrival. Maybe I didn´t read it correct.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2531.html
Quote
The MISSE-FF launches on a SpaceX Dragon Vehicle to the ISS, in the trunk area.
The facility is removed from the Dragon trunk by the ISS robotic arm, and placed on ELC 2, Site 3 on the starboard truss.
Five MSCs accompany the facility to orbit, and are robotically attached to the MISSE-FF shortly after arrival.
The facility has 12 “slots” for the attachment of 12 MSCs when the facility is fully populated. However, typical operations only have 11 or fewer MSCs installed- leaving one “slot” as a temporary berthing position during operations to retrieve MSCs that have completed their duration on orbit. Those MSCs can be replaced with new ones that contain new experiments/samples.
At the end of an experiment’s time on orbit, the MSC is retrieved by the ISS robotic arm and placed on the MISSE Transfer Tray (MTT) to be moved inside ISS through the Japanese Experiment Module’s (JEM) airlock.
Approximately six months later, additional MSCs are flown to orbit and attached to the facility- beginning a rotation process and continue to be manifested approximately every six months thereafter.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #100 on: 03/31/2018 02:21 PM »
Which suggests that the mass was about 435 kg (not sure if an empty passive FRAM was left in the trunk when it was dropped, so that mass may need to be further adjusted).  But, they were planning to launch with a certain number of the sample carrier slots already filled (7 on SpX-13).  So, if you're interested in strictly the Flight Facility and not including any of the sample carriers and samples' mass, it will be less.  If you're just interested in the launching mass of the whole experiment in launch configuration then it's probably pretty good.  Though it may be minorly different from the launch configuration mass on SpX-14 because the number of filled slots during launch will likely be different.  The number of filled slots is determined by trunk packing geometry and separations to the other trunk cargo.
If I understand this correctly, the MISSE-FF will be launched with empty slots, and the first five MSC will be installed by SSRMS shortly after arrival. Maybe I didn´t read it correct.
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/experiments/2531.html
Quote
<snip explanation about 5 carriers being loaded after arrival on station>

I just remembered that in the Updates thread there was a picture of the Dragon's Trunk with the payloads already integrated: https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45224.msg1803164#msg1803164

It's launching with at least 1 Sample Carrier slot already filled. [MISSE-FF is the payload in the upper right.  The sample carrier is the blue box hanging off the bottom left corner.  The two similar boxes in the middle of the payload are the payload avionics boxes.]  The 5 additional sample carriers mentioned in that NASA explanation are being transported in the pressurized section of the Dragon, in CTBs.  They will be transferred out through the JEM A/L and robotically installed on the Flight Facility after that is on the ELC.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #101 on: 04/01/2018 07:27 PM »
There is a MISSE-FF overview in the CRS-13 thread if anyone isn't already familiar with it:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=42775.msg1707908#msg1707908

Alas none of this gives a mass for MISSE-FF.  Total external cargo is 926 kg per the mission overgview.
ASIM is 314 kg per their website. PFCS is 111 kg although it presumably has a FRAM as well, usually about
45 kg I believe.  That would leave 456 kg from MISSE-FF which seems on the high side.

The original planned NASA SpX-13 unpressurized payload mass (as shown in the ISS planning doc gongora linked) including MISSE-FF: 1080 kg 

The actual flown mass of the unpressurized payload mass of SpX-13 (once MISSE-FF was dropped from the manifest):  645 kg

Which suggests that the mass was about 435 kg (not sure if an empty passive FRAM was left in the trunk when it was dropped, so that mass may need to be further adjusted).  But, they were planning to launch with a certain number of the sample carrier slots already filled (7 on SpX-13).  So, if you're interested in strictly the Flight Facility and not including any of the sample carriers and samples' mass, it will be less.  If you're just interested in the launching mass of the whole experiment in launch configuration then it's probably pretty good.  Though it may be minorly different from the launch configuration mass on SpX-14 because the number of filled slots during launch will likely be different.  The number of filled slots is determined by trunk packing geometry and separations to the other trunk cargo.

Good catch!! I remember those figures changing but I was not smart enough to apply the obvious inference for this mission.
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Offline RocketLover0119

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #102 on: 04/01/2018 08:36 PM »
Thanks Chris G for asking my question I pm'ed to you during the pre-launch conference! :)
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #103 on: 04/01/2018 09:17 PM »
A few photos from the "What's on Board" science briefing.

Offline Norm38

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #104 on: 04/02/2018 02:41 AM »
This booster is expendable is to test landing procedures/practices that push the bounds. This booster has already flown.  trade between land or do demonstration to fly a trajectory toward the limits to collect data for the future.

Does that essentially mean fly until out of fuel? They could just burn to depletion, true depletion to find the margin. Or are they still tuning aero simulations and can’t fully predict performance so they need the data not for fuel margin but for lift/drag?

Offline OneSpeed

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #105 on: 04/02/2018 03:44 AM »
This booster is expendable is to test landing procedures/practices that push the bounds. This booster has already flown.  trade between land or do demonstration to fly a trajectory toward the limits to collect data for the future.

Does that essentially mean fly until out of fuel? They could just burn to depletion, true depletion to find the margin. Or are they still tuning aero simulations and can’t fully predict performance so they need the data not for fuel margin but for lift/drag?

They already have a good idea of propellant margin from residuals on previous landings. They also have good data for L/D for AoA they have already flown. Perhaps they will try more extreme AoA to find the thermal and structural limits of the F9 fuselage. The higher AoA they can fly, in general, the more fuel they can save.
« Last Edit: 04/02/2018 04:16 AM by OneSpeed »

Offline marsbase

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #106 on: 04/02/2018 03:28 PM »
Who funded Dragon?  The first statement by Jessica Jensen at the CSR-14 Pre-launch Presser was careful to emphasize that SpaceX paid its own development cost: 
Reusability is really important for the future of spaceflight. It's the only way we're going to get thousands of people to space to explore the stars, the moon, Mars, and to make life multi-planetary. Otherwise, it's just going to be a cost-prohibitive dream. So we want to make a note that while SpaceX has put in all our own money, we developed all this technology on our own. We did have guidance from our partners.   https://gist.github.com/theinternetftw/fc34833bb504da2018031477a813dbdb

But the NasaSpaceFlight.com article written by William Graham and posted today says that:
Dragon first flew in December 2010, with a short test mission that ended with the spacecraft being recovered successfully in the Pacific Ocean. The spacecraft’s first two flights were made under NASA’s Commercial Orbital Transportation Services program, which funded development of Dragon and Cygnus ahead of the operational CRS resupply contracts being awarded.   https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/04/crs-14-spacex-falcon-9-second-flight-previously-flown-dragon/

It's obviously important to SpaceX to be seen as funding its own tech.  It matters politically.  So what's the actual story here?  Did SpaceX fund all its own tech or did Nasa pay for developement of the Dragon?

Offline rockets4life97

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #107 on: 04/02/2018 03:34 PM »
Who funded Dragon?  [snip]

I think Jessica Jensen is saying that SpaceX funded Dragon re-usability. It is clear NASA funded Dragon development (although perhaps SpaceX would have done that development anyway). However, NASA wasn't asking for reusability at the time (not sure if they are now).

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #108 on: 04/02/2018 03:37 PM »
Who funded Dragon?  [snip]

I think Jessica Jensen is saying that SpaceX funded Dragon re-usability. It is clear NASA funded Dragon development (although perhaps SpaceX would have done that development anyway). However, NASA wasn't asking for reusability at the time (not sure if they are now).

This is the distinction that makes so many fans for SpaceX. The contract was to develop a spacecraft, SpaceX added the additional goal of making it reusable. Same for Falcon. No doubt they could have made more money in the short term by going expendable, but they were thinking longer term.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #109 on: 04/02/2018 03:37 PM »
Who funded Dragon?  [snip]

I think Jessica Jensen is saying that SpaceX funded Dragon re-usability...

And Falcon reusability.  (Who funded what portion of the initial development is a debate we really don't need to start again.)

Offline yg1968

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #110 on: 04/02/2018 04:26 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?
I think it goes up on CRS-16

Yes, Spaceflight 101's ISS Calendar shows it being installed in December, during SpX/CRS-16's visit.  They don't give a source, but I assume they are working from the ISS FPIP.

Edit: Is there a recent public source (beyond SF101's calendar) for IDA-3 being on the SpX/CRS-16 manifest?
SpaceNews, 16 July 2016:
Quote
NASA is developing a third IDA to replace the one lost in last year’s launch failure. That third adapter is tentatively scheduled to launch on SpaceX’s CRS-16 cargo mission in 2018, said Kirk Shireman, NASA ISS program manager, during a July 13 briefing at the ISS Research and Development Conference in San Diego.

Yes, IDA-3 was initially planned for CRS-14 but was later pushed to CRS-16 in July of 2016. See here:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29401.msg1681173#msg1681173
« Last Edit: 04/02/2018 04:31 PM by yg1968 »

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #111 on: 04/02/2018 04:37 PM »
So IDA-3 is not going up on this one is it?
I think it goes up on CRS-16

Yes, Spaceflight 101's ISS Calendar shows it being installed in December, during SpX/CRS-16's visit.  They don't give a source, but I assume they are working from the ISS FPIP.

Edit: Is there a recent public source (beyond SF101's calendar) for IDA-3 being on the SpX/CRS-16 manifest?
SpaceNews, 16 July 2016:
Quote
NASA is developing a third IDA to replace the one lost in last year’s launch failure. That third adapter is tentatively scheduled to launch on SpaceX’s CRS-16 cargo mission in 2018, said Kirk Shireman, NASA ISS program manager, during a July 13 briefing at the ISS Research and Development Conference in San Diego.

Yes, IDA-3 was initially planned for CRS-14 but was later pushed to CRS-16 in July of 2016. See here:
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=29401.msg1681173#msg1681173

There was a recent FPIP shown at last month's NASA Advisory Council meeting (it still shows the IDA on SpX-16):
https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=45328.msg1803456#msg1803456
« Last Edit: 04/02/2018 04:38 PM by gongora »

Offline EspenU

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #112 on: 04/02/2018 07:10 PM »
Does anyone have an overview of how far behind ISS Dragon will be after launch?

Station should be visible over Europe from where I am 3 min after launch. So hopefully there is a chance to see Dragon trailing behind a couple of minutes later.

Offline northenarc

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #113 on: 04/02/2018 07:11 PM »
 It was noted by Chris Gebhardt in the update thread that 'Blast Danger Area (BDA)' was clear. How large is that area? I ask because in a clip I saw of the static fire it appeared (and appearances can be deceiving) as though vehicles were still passing 'fairly', though not outrageously, close to the pad. 

Offline Tomness

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #114 on: 04/02/2018 08:54 PM »
Really enjoyed Dan Huot & Randy Bresnik, its been awhile since Ive seen an astronaut with Randy's enthusiasm, I am sure PAO was like let Randy keep talking,  this is really good stuff

Offline Lar

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #115 on: 04/02/2018 09:00 PM »
Coverage has a couple slipups.

Commentator said "coming up on the final 2 minutes of the mission" instead of countdown (I am glad the mission went more than just 2 minutes more!)

Display tracking map had a Drone Ship location on the globe.

Maybe this is so routine that they aren't double checking things?
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Offline Ronsmytheiii

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #116 on: 04/02/2018 09:11 PM »
Cool screenshot from the tracking camera, "just cause"
And this is a good reminder that just because one of your fellow space enthusiasts occasionally voices doubts about the SpaceX schedule announcements or is cautious about believing SpaceX has licked a problem before actually seeing proof that's true, it doesn't mean they hate SpaceX.

Offline rsdavis9

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #117 on: 04/02/2018 09:11 PM »
I could have sworn that the spacex commentor said 3rd burn for the 2nd stage. As far as I know it just has 2 burns on this mission.

EDIT: I guess these missions are going so well and boringly that we have to pick on the small stuff.
At least we got to see the earth from orbit this time...
« Last Edit: 04/02/2018 09:15 PM by rsdavis9 »
With ELV best efficiency was the paradigm. The new paradigm is reusable, good enough, and commonality of design.
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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #118 on: 04/02/2018 09:19 PM »
Congratulations to SpaceX and NASA for the successful launch!

The onboard camera footage looked a bit lower in resolution compared to previous flights. Perhaps a requirement from NOAA?
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline JFARNS

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #119 on: 04/02/2018 09:19 PM »
He said the third burn would put the second stage into the Indian Ocean.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #120 on: 04/02/2018 09:23 PM »
Congratulations to SpaceX and NASA for the successful launch!

The onboard camera footage looked a bit lower in resolution compared to previous flights. Perhaps a requirement from NOAA?

Looks more like it was going through S-band, might have been in a Ku-band handover on TDRSS.
And this is a good reminder that just because one of your fellow space enthusiasts occasionally voices doubts about the SpaceX schedule announcements or is cautious about believing SpaceX has licked a problem before actually seeing proof that's true, it doesn't mean they hate SpaceX.

Offline rsdavis9

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #121 on: 04/02/2018 09:26 PM »
He said the third burn would put the second stage into the Indian Ocean.

And that would be the 2nd burn.
One burn to orbit.
One burn to deorbit.
Usually there is a circularization burn, but dragon doesn't need it because it burns its own engines.
With ELV best efficiency was the paradigm. The new paradigm is reusable, good enough, and commonality of design.
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Offline yokem55

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #122 on: 04/02/2018 09:48 PM »
The first stage burn was really long for a LEO mission. MECO was at 2:45 at about 7800 km/hr. This is almost as fast as staging on a GTO mission.

I'm really curious to find out how well the stage handled it's reentry and landing burns.

Offline whitelancer64

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #123 on: 04/02/2018 09:52 PM »
It was noted by Chris Gebhardt in the update thread that 'Blast Danger Area (BDA)' was clear. How large is that area? I ask because in a clip I saw of the static fire it appeared (and appearances can be deceiving) as though vehicles were still passing 'fairly', though not outrageously, close to the pad.

The "Blast Danger Area" (BDA) is a 2,700 ft radius area around Pad 39A

per: https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/02/fire-lc-39a-falcon-9-crs-10-launch/
« Last Edit: 04/02/2018 09:59 PM by whitelancer64 »
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Online niwax

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #124 on: 04/02/2018 10:01 PM »
The first stage burn was really long for a LEO mission. MECO was at 2:45 at about 7800 km/hr. This is almost as fast as staging on a GTO mission.

I'm really curious to find out how well the stage handled it's reentry and landing burns.

Possibly a test for FH center core high speed reentry?

Online meekGee

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #125 on: 04/02/2018 11:12 PM »
This has got to be the shortest mission-specific thread ever.  Coming in late and judging by #posts, I first thought it must have been a scrub.

Have we sunk so low?  Are SpaceX launches now, god help us, BORING?

:)
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Offline marsbase

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #126 on: 04/02/2018 11:34 PM »
This has got to be the shortest mission-specific thread ever.  Coming in late and judging by #posts, I first thought it must have been a scrub.

Have we sunk so low?  Are SpaceX launches now, god help us, BORING?
Did you watch the CRS-14 Pre-launch Press Conference?  NASA had 3 people there.  The Air Force had one person there. And SpaceX had one person.  Almost all of the questions from the press and social media sites were for SpaceX.  So, no it's not boring.  SpaceX is where the action is.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #127 on: 04/02/2018 11:40 PM »
The first Block 5 launch is going to be a recovery attempt, right?
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Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #128 on: 04/02/2018 11:42 PM »
Display tracking map had a Drone Ship location on the globe.

While they didn't have the ASDS on station, they did send the support ship which is what receives the telemetry from the descending stage.  It's possible that the location marker on the map is actually showing that ship's location and has just been labelled "droneship" because on recovery missions they are staged close enough to the ASDS for people to get the idea. 
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Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #129 on: 04/02/2018 11:44 PM »
Congratulations to SpaceX and NASA for the successful launch!

The onboard camera footage looked a bit lower in resolution compared to previous flights. Perhaps a requirement from NOAA?

Looks more like it was going through S-band, might have been in a Ku-band handover on TDRSS.

I don't believe SpaceX uses TDRSS. 
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Offline rickl

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #130 on: 04/03/2018 12:36 AM »
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the apparent debris that was visible on the video after solar array deploy.



The first object flew past quickly from left to right at T+15:03 to 15:05.

The second one moved much more slowly and tumbled.  It was visible from T+15:10 to 15:24 when it disappeared in front of the solar panel.  It seemed to me to have lodged in the wiring harness.
The Space Age is just starting to get interesting.

Offline terryy

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #131 on: 04/03/2018 12:41 AM »
I've been tracking the max velocity numbers at MECO from all the webcasts which has the speed gauges.  I noticed on today's mission they had a max speed at MECO of 7,889 km/hr.  This is considerably faster than the previous four CRS missions which typically have a max speed at MECO of ~6,000 km/hr.  Anyone know why?  Is it because they used some more of the reserve recovery fuel since they weren't going to recover it?  Just found it curious.

Interestingly enough the previous highest speed for a CRS mission was CRS-8 at 6,658 km/hr.  Which just happens to be the stage that was re-flown today.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #132 on: 04/03/2018 12:46 AM »
I've been tracking the max velocity numbers at MECO from all the webcasts which has the speed gauges.  I noticed on today's mission they had a max speed at MECO of 7,889 km/hr.  This is considerably faster than the previous four CRS missions which typically have a max speed at MECO of ~6,000 km/hr.  Anyone know why?  Is it because they used some more of the reserve recovery fuel since they weren't going to recover it?  Just found it curious.

Interestingly enough the previous highest speed for a CRS mission was CRS-8 at 6,658 km/hr.  Which just happens to be the stage that was re-flown today.

Typically CRS missions aim for RTLS meaning low staging velocity close to shore, this was a water landing test at the most extreme reentry regime.

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #133 on: 04/03/2018 02:19 AM »
I've been tracking the max velocity numbers at MECO from all the webcasts which has the speed gauges.  I noticed on today's mission they had a max speed at MECO of 7,889 km/hr.  This is considerably faster than the previous four CRS missions which typically have a max speed at MECO of ~6,000 km/hr.  Anyone know why?  Is it because they used some more of the reserve recovery fuel since they weren't going to recover it?  Just found it curious.

Interestingly enough the previous highest speed for a CRS mission was CRS-8 at 6,658 km/hr.  Which just happens to be the stage that was re-flown today.

Yes, if you go and compare the length of the first stage burns (either in the webcasts or from the presskits) you will see that they had a longer burn prior to MECO.  Normally now they are doing RTLS with the booster but this time they weren't.  Also, as you point out CRS-8 for having a high MECO speed, that was also the last CRS mission with a downrange recovery attempt (first successful ASDS landing). 
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Online Michael Baylor

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #134 on: 04/03/2018 04:17 AM »
Did you watch the CRS-14 Pre-launch Press Conference?  NASA had 3 people there.  The Air Force had one person there. And SpaceX had one person.  Almost all of the questions from the press and social media sites were for SpaceX.  So, no it's not boring.  SpaceX is where the action is.
According to Chris G, there were only 10 members of the press at the prelaunch conference. I am not saying your claim isn't valid, but the evidence supporting it is not the greatest.

Offline bjornl

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #135 on: 04/03/2018 07:57 AM »
Interestingly enough the previous highest speed for a CRS mission was CRS-8 at 6,658 km/hr.  Which just happens to be the stage that was re-flown today.
This was the first stage from CRS-12; Dragon was from CRS-8.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #136 on: 04/03/2018 09:07 AM »
I have not heard any calls about the re-entry burn start/complete in the webcast. Has there been re-entry burn?
« Last Edit: 04/03/2018 09:12 AM by Demidrol »

Offline marsbase

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #137 on: 04/03/2018 12:09 PM »
Did you watch the CRS-14 Pre-launch Press Conference?  NASA had 3 people there.  The Air Force had one person there. And SpaceX had one person.  Almost all of the questions from the press and social media sites were for SpaceX.  So, no it's not boring.  SpaceX is where the action is.
According to Chris G, there were only 10 members of the press at the prelaunch conference. I am not saying your claim isn't valid, but the evidence supporting it is not the greatest.
I could only see 4 or 5 members of the press on the video and there were questions from online participants too.  There was clearly much more interest in the launch platform than in NASA or the science packages. So maybe NASA was MORE boring than SpaceX?

Offline ZachS09

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #138 on: 04/03/2018 12:12 PM »
I have not heard any calls about the re-entry burn start/complete in the webcast. Has there been re-entry burn?

I’m not sure. Maybe this new landing profile involved reentering the atmosphere WITHOUT conducting an entry burn, and using a 3-engine landing burn at the last second.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #139 on: 04/03/2018 02:50 PM »
I seem to recall hearing on the webcast in the flight audio loop a call out saying that Stage 1 AFTS had been safed. That was considerably after the time frame where the first stage would have "landed". Could this be some proof that Stage 1 survived its landing regime and splashdown and SpaceX has to deal with another floater? ::)

*edit* Time marker 27:38 in the video above
« Last Edit: 04/03/2018 02:57 PM by BunkerTheHusky »

Offline LouScheffer

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #140 on: 04/03/2018 02:56 PM »
I have not heard any calls about the re-entry burn start/complete in the webcast. Has there been re-entry burn?

I’m not sure. Maybe this new landing profile involved reentering the atmosphere WITHOUT conducting an entry burn, and using a 3-engine landing burn at the last second.
As far as I can recall, there has never been a case where the stage was destroyed during entry, or survived but was damaged enough it could not restart/land.  So SpaceX has not yet found the shortest entry burn that could be used.  This would have been (and maybe still is) a great set of experiments for the old block 3/4 boosters they are not trying to re-use.  Try shorter and shorter entry burns, and for each one make sure the landing burn still works, the grid fins were not destroyed, and so on.  They would not want to try this with a block 5, since finding the edge of the envelope means losing a booster.

Online stcks

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #141 on: 04/03/2018 02:58 PM »
I seem to recall hearing on the webcast in the flight audio loop a call out saying that Stage 1 AFTS had been safed. That was considerably after the time frame where the first stage would have "landed". Could this be some proof that Stage 1 survived its landing regime and splashdown and SpaceX has to deal with another floater? ::)

Yes the callout was at T+7:44, over a minute later than a typical GTO mission. Does it prove anything? Nope. What it suggests is that the first stage flew to a higher apogee (and in fact, this is confirmed if you compare the telemetry) and thus the stage spent more time falling back.

Online gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #142 on: 04/03/2018 03:20 PM »
Could this be some proof that Stage 1 survived its landing regime

In the post launch press conference Jessica Jensen said they didn't do a landing test, there was no soft landing in the ocean.

Offline whitelancer64

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #143 on: 04/03/2018 03:23 PM »
I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the apparent debris that was visible on the video after solar array deploy.


The first object flew past quickly from left to right at T+15:03 to 15:05.

The second one moved much more slowly and tumbled.  It was visible from T+15:10 to 15:24 when it disappeared in front of the solar panel.  It seemed to me to have lodged in the wiring harness.

It was most likely just flecks of ice. The thrusters are doing small firings at this point, and the primary byproduct of hydrazine combustion is water. Some small bits of ice build up on the thrusters and occasionally come loose.
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Offline Demidrol

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #144 on: 04/03/2018 03:51 PM »
That was considerably after the time frame where the first stage would have "landed".
Presumably this is due to more late MECO.

Offline deruch

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #145 on: 04/03/2018 05:17 PM »
Did you watch the CRS-14 Pre-launch Press Conference?  NASA had 3 people there.  The Air Force had one person there. And SpaceX had one person.  Almost all of the questions from the press and social media sites were for SpaceX.  So, no it's not boring.  SpaceX is where the action is.
According to Chris G, there were only 10 members of the press at the prelaunch conference. I am not saying your claim isn't valid, but the evidence supporting it is not the greatest.

Easter weekend (it's a 3-day, right?) launch with the prelaunch conference on Easter Sunday itself.  Not sure one should take too much from the attendance at this one.
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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #146 on: 04/03/2018 05:29 PM »
In the post launch press conference Jessica Jensen said they didn't do a landing test, there was no soft landing in the ocean.

I missed the post news conference. Thanks for this info I didn't have!

Offline sewebster

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #147 on: 04/04/2018 01:57 AM »
I have not heard any calls about the re-entry burn start/complete in the webcast. Has there been re-entry burn?

I’m not sure. Maybe this new landing profile involved reentering the atmosphere WITHOUT conducting an entry burn, and using a 3-engine landing burn at the last second.
As far as I can recall, there has never been a case where the stage was destroyed during entry, or survived but was damaged enough it could not restart/land.  So SpaceX has not yet found the shortest entry burn that could be used.  This would have been (and maybe still is) a great set of experiments for the old block 3/4 boosters they are not trying to re-use.  Try shorter and shorter entry burns, and for each one make sure the landing burn still works, the grid fins were not destroyed, and so on.  They would not want to try this with a block 5, since finding the edge of the envelope means losing a booster.

Maybe, but they might have already landed something that was more damaged by entry than they liked... e.g. for re-use, or even reliable landing.

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #148 on: 04/04/2018 07:26 AM »
The 5 additional sample carriers mentioned in that NASA explanation are being transported in the pressurized section of the Dragon, in CTBs.  They will be transferred out through the JEM A/L and robotically installed on the Flight Facility after that is on the ELC.
This JAXA schedule http://iss.jaxa.jp/kiboexp/plan/status/images/schedule_180404.pdf suggest, that on April,13 will be "Prepare for outside boarding" (google translation) of the MISSE Transfer Tray, so we can expect the installation of the five MISSE Sample Carriers in the week starting with April, 16.

Online sanman

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #149 on: 04/04/2018 10:20 AM »
They would not want to try this with a block 5, since finding the edge of the envelope means losing a booster.

Also, even the shortest "successful" landing could incur thermal and mechanical loads that significantly shorten the life of the booster. An optimal landing is also one that preserves the longevity of the vehicle.

Offline LouScheffer

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #150 on: 04/04/2018 01:45 PM »
They would not want to try this with a block 5, since finding the edge of the envelope means losing a booster.

Also, even the shortest "successful" landing could incur thermal and mechanical loads that significantly shorten the life of the booster. An optimal landing is also one that preserves the longevity of the vehicle.
However you define "successful", they do not want to get too close to this boundary with a Block 5, either to see it fail or reduce its life.  Hence these experiments are best done with boosters that they do not intend to re-use.  That's why now is an excellent time to try this, since they do not intend to keep or reuse the older block 3/4 boosters anyway.

Offline su27k

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #151 on: 04/05/2018 12:50 PM »
More photos from Artemyev

Why do I always end up feeling like the Russians have better photographers?  Or maybe they just have cleaner windows, IDK?

I wonder if there're agreements between NASA and SpaceX to limit the resolution of the photos taken, because SpaceX doesn't want to show too much details of the Dragon hardware?

Offline OnWithTheShow

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #152 on: 04/05/2018 01:59 PM »
They would not want to try this with a block 5, since finding the edge of the envelope means losing a booster.

Also, even the shortest "successful" landing could incur thermal and mechanical loads that significantly shorten the life of the booster. An optimal landing is also one that preserves the longevity of the vehicle.

You also wont know about the damage unless you recover the booster to inspect it.

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #153 on: 04/05/2018 06:31 PM »
More photos from Artemyev

Why do I always end up feeling like the Russians have better photographers?  Or maybe they just have cleaner windows, IDK?

While we learn by taking selfies they're learning the rule of thirds & composition.

I do wonder, if Roskosmos partnered with an IMAX documentary/"mission" production company, what kind of companion large-format feature that the cosmonauts could shoot, perhaps as a companion work to A Beautiful Planet 3D.

A thought.

(Not knocking the photographic/cinematographic abilities of the NASA/ESA/JAXA/CSA astronaut corps--they've done a great job over the decades--the popular Shuttle/Station/Hubble IMAX titles of past and present are a testament of their skills and dedication.)
« Last Edit: 04/05/2018 06:36 PM by zubenelgenubi »
Support your local planetarium!

Offline jeng_eo

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #154 on: 04/06/2018 08:50 AM »
I noticed in the ISS Daily Summary Report that they used "Forced Based Capture, a software enhancement to the Latching End Effector (LEE)" to catch the dragon but I could not find further information about this. Does anyone know more about this new procedure?

Offline eeergo

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #155 on: 04/06/2018 09:06 AM »
I noticed in the ISS Daily Summary Report that they used "Forced Based Capture, a software enhancement to the Latching End Effector (LEE)" to catch the dragon but I could not find further information about this. Does anyone know more about this new procedure?

The snare cable on the new LEE-A (the old POA-LEE) was found to be damaged during a few trial runs shortly after swapping it during the latest US EVAs. From 03/21'2 ISS Status Report:

Quote
During a survey of LEE A on February 28th, one of the snare cables was found to be damaged. CSA analysis predicts load limit exceedances for certain SpaceX-14 capture scenarios. Ground teams are coordinating to determine the forward path for SpacX-14 capture operations.

They performed some tests in the last few days before SpX-14's arrival, grappling the SPDM and other PDGFs on Station to assess loads, and apparently they developed a new procedure to make loads acceptable. A new LEE is coming up on SpX-15, it remains to be seen whether they accept the current LEE-A as-is or prefer to swap it out directly with the new unit.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #156 on: 04/07/2018 04:45 PM »
Here is a link to a 245 megapixel stitched photo of B1039.2 I shot on the morning before launch. Scroll in to see all the little details!

https://easyzoom.com/imageaccess/807980b0ca5f40b7b38281628e74f4fc
« Last Edit: 04/07/2018 05:03 PM by BradyKenniston »

Offline Olaf

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-14 : April 2, 2018 - Discussion
« Reply #157 on: 04/16/2018 03:32 PM »
The 5 additional sample carriers mentioned in that NASA explanation are being transported in the pressurized section of the Dragon, in CTBs.  They will be transferred out through the JEM A/L and robotically installed on the Flight Facility after that is on the ELC.
As we have learned today, there are only four additional sample carriers. The fifth must be the one, which was already on earth installed on MISSE-FF.
https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2018/04/
Quote
The crew then reconfigured the JEM ORU Transfer Interface (JOTI) and installed the MISSE-FF Transfer Tray (MTT) on the slide table and loaded it with 4 MISSE Sample Carriers.

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