Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 15, 2017 : UPDATES  (Read 58043 times)

Online Chris Bergin

CRS-13 UPDATE thread

NSF Threads for CRS-13 : Discussion / Updates / L2 Coverage November-December / ASDS / Party

NSF Articles for CRS-13:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS-13

NSF Articles for CRS missions :  https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/?s=CRS


Launch 15 December at ~1035 EST/1535 UTC on Falcon 9 (booster 1035.2) from SLC-40.



External cargo: Space Debris Sensor, MISSE-FF, TSIS



Other SpaceX resources on NASASpaceflight:
   SpaceX News Articles (Recent)  /   SpaceX News Articles from 2006 (Including numerous exclusive Elon interviews)
   SpaceX Dragon Articles  /  SpaceX Missions Section (with Launch Manifest and info on past and future missions)
   L2 SpaceX Section


Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #2 on: 11/20/2017 07:58 PM »
NASA:

13th SpaceX Commercial Resupply Mission Will Be Packed with Space Station Research

 

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FL. (November 20, 2017) – The SpaceX Falcon 9 vehicle is slated to launch its 13th cargo resupply mission (CRS-13) to the International Space Station no earlier than December from historic Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will carry more than a dozen International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory payloads to conduct research across a variety of areas aimed at improving life on Earth. From plant biology, to technology demonstrations aimed at enhancing bone growth, and more efficient treatments for the diabetic community, this launch will bring new innovative concepts to the microgravity environment of the space station. This launch will culminate a robust year of research on the U.S. National Lab, as more experiments than ever before have reached the orbiting laboratory.

 

Below are highlights of sponsored U.S. National Lab investigations that are part of the SpaceX CRS-13 mission:

 

Assessing Osteoblast Response to Tetranite™

Nikolaos Tapinos, Launchpad Medical (Boston, MA)

 

The goal of this investigation is to explore the ability of Tetranite™, a synthetic bone material capable of adhering bone to metal within minutes to accelerate bone repair. It is well known that microgravity affects bone cell growth and healing, mimicking the symptoms observed in osteoporosis. The investigators seek to evaluate the response of osteoblasts (a bone cell subtype responsible for renewing bones) to Tetranite™. Understanding bone cell-Tetranite™ interactions could provide insight into the post-fracture bone healing response and assist in the development of more effective treatments for patients with osteoporosis. In addition, this cell culture project should provide the basis for follow-on studies of the bone healing response in small rodents.

Hardware Partner: BioServe Space Technologies

 

 

Barley Germination and Malting in Microgravity

Dr. Gary Hanning, Budweiser (Ft. Collins, CO)

 

This project will explore the effects of spaceflight on the germination of strains of an important food crop, barley (Hordeum vulgare), including proprietary strains under development. Observing changes in gene expression and germination after exposure to microgravity contributes to knowledge about how different cultivars (plants of the same species that possess genetic differences) may be better prepared to handle Earth-based stress, such as temperature extremes or water scarcity. An important ingredient for Budweiser, barley is also the 4th largest cereal grain grown in the world and is grown in diverse environments. Studying barley in microgravity may reveal new information regarding the germination process and identify key genes that enable some cultivars to survive in stressful environments.

Hardware Partner: Space Tango

 

Characterizing Arabidopsis Root Attractions-2

Dr. Anna-Lisa Paul, University of Florida (Gainesville, FL)

 

An extension to the CARA project to: 1) conduct additional molecular analyses of the CARA samples, analyses that can significantly contribute to GeneLab and have been made possible by new advances in RNA isolation from small sample amounts, and 2) collect additional ISS imaging of plates (with no sample return) to extend data from the unique LMM imaging capabilities that were revealed by the initial CARA imaging.

Hardware Partner: Zin Technologies, CASIS

 

Implantable Glucose Biosensers

Michail Kastelloizios, Biorasis (Storrs, CT)

 

This project seeks to improve the accuracy of a wireless, medically implantable continuous glucose biosensor (Glucowizzard™) for day-to-day diabetes management. Slow glucose transport within human tissue (through the capillary walls and surrounding tissue toward the sensing site of the biosensor) can create delays of up to 20 minutes in real-time monitoring of glucose levels. This delay can be detrimental in achieving tight glycemic control, which has been linked to serious secondary complications in patients with diabetes. The International Space Station provides a microgravity environment in which reduced fluid movement allows precise monitoring of the role of diffusion in glucose transport, thus improving the mathematical models that determine the accuracy of the Glucowizzard continuous glucose monitoring biosensor. The World Health Organization projects that the global diabetic population will reach 366 million by 2030. In order to prevent serious health problems, many people with diabetes currently use glucose biosensors that may inaccurately measure their glucose levels prior to self-administering insulin. Biorasis is addressing this critical need by studying fluid movement onboard the International Space Station in order to optimize the Glucowizzard™ continuous glucose monitoring biosensor.

Hardware Partner: Space Tango

 

Implantable Nanochannel System for Delivery of Therapeutics for Muscle Atrophy (Rodent Research-6)

Dr. Alessandro Grattoni, Houston Methodist Research Institute (Houston, TX)

 

An implantable drug delivery system that circumvents the need for daily injections will be tested in a rodent model with microgravity-induced muscle atrophy. Specifically, the drug formoterol, used in the management of asthma and other medical conditions, will be administered by controlled release from a nanochannel implant to achieve a constant and reliable dosage. If successful, this system could serve as a more reliable and accurate technology for drug delivery. In collaboration with Novartis and NanoMedical Systems, this validated system may rapidly translate into a commercial product. Sarcopenia, or muscle wasting, is a condition that affects more than 50% of the geriatric population, however therapeutics used to treat this condition are limited to physical activity or generic hormones. The most commonly used pharmaceutical intervention for sarcopenia is formoterol, but administrating these drugs requires a daily injection, which can be inconvenient. This collaboration between The Houston Methodist Research Institute, Novartis, and NanoMedical Systems plans to develop an implantable device that will safely administer formoterol over a long period of time, without patients needing a daily injection, improving quality of life.

Hardware Partner: BioServe Space Technologies

 

Optical Fiber Production in Microgravity

Michael Snyder, Made In Space (Mountain View, CA)

 

High-performance optical fiber is used extensively for the manufacture of efficient and compact ultraviolet, visible, and infrared fiber lasers due to its low intrinsic loss, wide transparency window, and small phonon energy. This technology enables advances in many different sectors, including medical devices such as laser scalpels and endoscopes, sensors for the aerospace and defense industry, and telecommunications applications. The optical fiber ZBLAN has the potential to far exceed the performance of other fibers in common use. Despite this, the terrestrially produced fiber suffers from physical impurities which contribute to light scattering and absorption loss, reducing performance. Microgravity has been shown to significantly reduce these imperfections, and production of fibers in space may enable not only improved materials but also new frontiers for manufacturing in space.

Hardware Partner: Made In Space

 

SPHERES Tether Slosh

Dr. Hans-Juergen Zachrau, AIRBUS DS Space Systems (Webster, TX)

 

This project will use existing SPHERES hardware to examine the active steering of a passive liquid-containing body in space. The Tether–Slosh experiment combines features of both the Tether–Demo and SPHERES–Slosh experiment into a single investigation utilizing hardware available on‐board International Space Station to conduct the experiment. By placing an acceleration sensor from Airbus DS into the Slosh tank and using an already certified WISENET sensor package, this experiment makes extensive use of resources already on International Space Station to generate data that will inform models for the automated steering of passive objects including disabled satellites. The small satellite market is projected to be valued at $5.32 billion by 2021; software that remotely enables the re-positioning of passive objects in LEO has the potential to expand small satellite use and accelerate satellite market development.

Hardware Partner: AIRBUS DS Space Systems

 

Zaiput Flow Technologies – Galactic Grant

Andrea Adamo, Zaiput Flow Technologies (Boston, MA)

 

This experiment will explore the effects of microgravity on a device for the continuous separation of immiscible liquids as part of continuous flow chemistry approaches. Continuous flow chemistry, the process of performing chemical reactions in a tube or pipe, has many advantages over batch chemistry for some applications, including faster reaction times, separation of reactants from products, quick reaction optimization, easy scale-up, and the integration of typically separate processes. While common separation methods rely on liquid sedimentation, this system has the unique characteristic of relying on surface forces to accomplish liquid-liquid extraction. To serve the needs of chemical production, the device needs to be scaled-up, which requires understanding the effect that gravity and length scales have on the flow path as it relates to separation efficiency.

Hardware Partner: Space Tango

 

“This launch culminates an impressive year of research onboard the International Space Station and the U.S. National Laboratory,” said CASIS Director of Operations Ken Shields. “We thank our launch partners and NASA for the continued support as we look to many more fruitful years of International Space Station utilization and the mounting discoveries that will come from this incredible research facility.”

 

To learn more about these investigations and other station research, visit www.spacestationresearch.com.

 

# # #

 

About CASIS: The Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) is the non-profit organization selected to manage the ISS National Laboratory with a focus on enabling a new era of space research to improve life on Earth. In this innovative role, CASIS promotes and brokers a diverse range of research in life sciences, physical sciences, remote sensing, technology development, and education.

 

Since 2011, the ISS National Lab portfolio has included hundreds of novel research projects spanning multiple scientific disciplines, all with the intention of benefitting life on Earth. Working together with NASA, CASIS aims to advance the nation’s leadership in commercial space, pursue groundbreaking science not possible on Earth, and leverage the space station to inspire the next generation.

 

About the ISS National Laboratory: In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation's newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users, and advancing STEM education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low Earth orbit, and varied environments of space.

 

# # #

Offline catdlr

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #3 on: 11/21/2017 10:06 PM »

November 21, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-138
NASA to Highlight Science on Next Resupply Mission to Space Station


NASA will host a media teleconference at 1 p.m. EST Wednesday, Nov. 29, to discuss a number of science investigations
 and instruments launching to the International Space Station on the next SpaceX
 commercial resupply mission.

SpaceX is targeting no earlier than Dec. 4 for the launch of its Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

Kirt Costello, deputy chief scientist for the International Space Station Program at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, and Mike Roberts, deputy chief scientist at the Center of Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS), will kick off the call with an overview of the research and technology aboard Dragon. Also participating in the briefing will be:

Andrew Rush, president and chief executive officer, Made in Space, will discuss its Fiber Optics
 payload, which will test manufacturing fiber optic filaments in a microgravity environment. This could lead to production of higher-quality fiber optic products both in space and on Earth.
Brian Hess, chief executive officer, and Grayson Allen, chief financial officer, both of LaunchPad Medical, will discuss an investigation using synthetic bone material
 to accelerate bone repair.
Dong Wu, project scientist at the NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and Peter Pilewskie, lead scientist at the University of Colorado, Boulder, will discuss NASA’s Total and Spectral Solar Irradiance Sensor
 (TSIS), a new instrument launching to station that will measure the Sun’s energy input to Earth.
Joseph Hamilton, principal investigator, NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, will discuss the Space Debris Sensor
, an external tool which will measure the orbital debris environment around the space station.
Yasaman Shirazi, mission scientist at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Silicon Valley, California, will discuss an investigation testing drug delivery systems for combatting muscle breakdown
 in microgravity.
To participate in the teleconference, media must contract Cheryl Warner at 202-358-1100 or cheryl.m.warner@nasa.gov by 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 28, for dial-in information.

Audio of the teleconference will be streamed live online at:

https://www.nasa.gov/live

-end-
Tony De La Rosa

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #4 on: 11/27/2017 04:48 PM »

L2 has the Static Fire as NET November 29.

Update:
That's no longer the case, so we'll have to watch for new dates.

Offline mainmind

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #5 on: 11/27/2017 06:36 PM »

L2 has the Static Fire as NET November 29.

Update:
That's no longer the case, so we'll have to watch for new dates.

Flight plan now has the launch moved to 8 Dec w/ capture on the 10th. Any word as to why the four day move?


--

(Note from me...this is solid info, but waiting for a new Static Fire date which will show the firm new target date as this will be a placeholder until the former is ready. All responses to the discussion thread as we're keeping this on updates...which the above is per this note :) - Chris).
« Last Edit: 11/27/2017 08:07 PM by Chris Bergin »

Offline ChrisGebhardt

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #6 on: 11/28/2017 07:13 PM »
Confirmed publicly now by NASA to be the 8th at 13:20 EST because of SLC-40 readiness.

"NASA and our commercial cargo provider SpaceX are targeting the 13th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for no earlier than 1:20 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 8. This new launch date will allow SpaceX to finalize pad readiness, and provide an additional launch opportunity Saturday, Dec. 9, if needed. Carrying about 4,800 pounds of cargo including critical science and research, the Dragon spacecraft will spend a month attached to the space station."
« Last Edit: 11/28/2017 07:13 PM by ChrisGebhardt »

Offline jpo234

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #7 on: 11/29/2017 03:46 PM »
Per NSF's news weeks ago:

https://twitter.com/StephenClark1/status/935910448821669888
Quote
NASA’s Bill Gerstenmaier confirms SpaceX has approved use of previously-flown booster (from June’s CRS-13 cargo launch) for upcoming space station resupply launch set for Dec. 8.

It's probably NASA that gave the approval and the booster was from CRS-11, but here it is.
« Last Edit: 11/29/2017 08:28 PM by Chris Bergin »
You want to be inspired by things. You want to wake up in the morning and think the future is going to be great. That's what being a spacefaring civilization is all about. It's about believing in the future and believing the future will be better than the past. And I can't think of anything more exciting than being out there among the stars.

Offline gongora

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #8 on: 11/29/2017 03:50 PM »
MISSE-FF wasn't ready in time.

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #9 on: 11/29/2017 06:28 PM »
New TEL vertical


Offline jacqmans

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #10 on: 11/30/2017 10:11 AM »

Offline Eagandale4114

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #11 on: 11/30/2017 09:46 PM »
Webcast link

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #12 on: 12/01/2017 04:11 PM »
NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting its 13th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for 1:20 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 8. Coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website Thursday, Dec. 7, with two briefings.

Loaded with about 4,800 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket. The payloads include crucial materials to directly support several of the more than 250 science and research investigations to be conducted on the orbiting laboratory during Expeditions 53, 54 and 55.

About 10 minutes after launch, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit and deploy its solar arrays. A carefully choreographed series of thruster firings are scheduled to allow the spacecraft to rendezvous with the space station. NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba will grapple Dragon using the space station’s robotic arm. It then will be installed on the station’s Harmony module.

Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will begin at 4:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 10, on NASA TV, with installation coverage set to begin at 7:30 a.m.

The Dragon spacecraft will spend approximately one month attached to the space station. It will remain until Jan. 6 when the spacecraft will return to Earth with results of earlier experiments, splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California.

Media at the agency’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida will have the opportunity to participate in special tours and briefings Dec. 7 and 8, as well as view the launch. The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed. For more information about media accreditation, contact Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

Media badges will be issued at the Press Accreditation Office located on State Road 3, Merritt Island.

Please note that RSVPs will be required for the following events:

-L-1 Media Tour
-L-1 Remote Camera Setup

-L-0 Pad Photo Opportunity
-Launch (NASA Causeway or VAB Roof)

When you RSVP please indicate in the subject line your name, affiliation and specific area(s) related to your RSVP. RSVPs must be sent to ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov no later than 4 p.m., Dec. 5.

L-1 Day (Thursday, Dec. 7)

Press Site Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Badging Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Launch Complex 39B Update Tour (10 a.m.)

Media will get an up-close view of the refurbished launch pad, including the newly finished flame trench. Launch Complex 39B is one of many areas being upgraded at Kennedy to accommodate future NASA and commercial launches.

Prelaunch News Conference on NASA TV (11 a.m.)

A prelaunch status briefing will be held at Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium at 11 a.m. and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. Media who would like to call in should phone the NASA News Center at 321-867-2468.

Remote Camera Setup (1:30 p.m.)

A limited number of news media will be able to establish sound-activated remote cameras to capture the liftoff from outside the Launch Complex 40 pad perimeter.

“What’s on Board” Science Briefing on NASA TV (3:30 p.m.)

A science, research and technology briefing will air live at 3:30 p.m. on NASA Television and the agency’s website at http://www.nasa.gov/ntv. This briefing is for NASA Social participants and interested media.

L-0 Day (Friday, Dec. 8)

Press Site Hours of Operation: 8 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Badging Hours of Operation: 8:30 – 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Pad Photo Opportunity

Media will have the opportunity to photograph the vehicle on the launch pad (3:15 a.m.)

One-on-One Interview Opportunities (10 a.m. – 12 p.m.)

Media will have the opportunity to interview mission experts at the Press Site.

Launch Viewing

News media wanting to view the launch from either the NASA Causeway or the VAB roof (space is limited) need to arrive to the Press Site by 11:30 a.m.

Post-Launch News Conference (3 p.m.)

A post-launch news conference will occur at about 3 p.m. in Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website. Media who would like to call in should phone the NASA News Center at 321-867-2468.

NASA TV Launch Coverage

NASA TV live coverage will begin at 12:45 p.m. For NASA TV downlink information, schedules and links to streaming video, visit http://www.nasa.gov/ntv.

Audio only of the news conferences and launch coverage will be carried on the NASA “V” circuits, which may be accessed by dialing 321-867-1220, -1240, -1260 or -7135. On launch day, "mission audio," the launch conductor’s countdown activities without NASA TV launch commentary, will be carried on 321-867-7135. Launch also will be available on local amateur VHF radio frequency 146.940 MHz heard within Brevard County on the Space Coast.

NASA Web Prelaunch and Launch Coverage

Prelaunch and launch day coverage of the SpaceX CRS-13 flight will be available on the NASA website. Coverage will include live streaming and blog updates beginning at 12:45 p.m. as the countdown milestones occur. On-demand streaming video, podcast and photos of the launch will be available shortly after liftoff. For questions about countdown coverage, contact the newsroom at 321-867-2468. You can follow countdown coverage on our launch blog at http://blogs.nasa.gov/spacex.

Post-Launch News Conference on NASA TV

A post-launch news conference will occur at about 3 p.m. in Kennedy’s Press Site TV Auditorium and air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website at http://www.nasa.gov/ntv. Media who would like to call in should phone the NASA News Center at 321-867-2468.

Learn more about the SpaceX CRS-13 mission by going to the mission home page at:

http://www.nasa.gov/spacex

-end-

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #13 on: 12/01/2017 05:34 PM »
Static Fire article:
https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2017/12/slc-40-comes-back-with-crs-13-static-fire/ - by Chris Gebhardt

TEL expected to be still mainly "grey" as they've only painted some of it as of today.

Also there is a claim the F9 will "look" a bit different than you'd expect. Nothing dramatic, more amusing (and practicable), but I want to "see" it before blurting anything else in public. I'll see if SpaceX want to confirm/comment on it before we see the booster rollout.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #14 on: 12/02/2017 07:17 AM »
December 01, 2017
MEDIA ADVISORY M17-142

NASA Television to Air Launch of Next Space Station Resupply Mission


NASA commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting its 13th commercial resupply services mission to the International Space Station for no earlier than 1:20 p.m. EST Friday, Dec. 8.

Mission coverage will begin on NASA Television and the agency’s website Thursday, Dec. 7, with two news briefings.

Packed with almost 4,800 pounds of research, crew supplies and hardware, the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft will launch on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

NASA TV mission coverage is as follows:


Thursday, Dec. 7
•11 a.m. – Prelaunch news conference with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program, SpaceX, and the 45th Space Wing at Patrick Air Force Base
•3:30 p.m. – “What’s on Board” science briefing, highlighting research testing: fiber optic filaments, how plants respond to microgravity, the accuracy of a biosensor used for diabetes management, a drug delivery system for combatting muscle atrophy and instruments to measure the Sun’s energy input to Earth and orbital debris.


Friday, Dec. 8
•12:45 p.m. – Launch commentary coverage begins
•3 p.m. – Post-launch news conference with representatives from NASA’s International Space Station Program and SpaceX


Sunday, Dec. 10
•4:30 a.m. – Dragon rendezvous at the space station and capture
•7:30 a.m. – Installation coverage

About 10 minutes after launch on Dec. 8, Dragon will reach its preliminary orbit and deploy its solar arrays. A carefully choreographed series of thruster firings are scheduled to bring the spacecraft to rendezvous with the space station. NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei and Joe Acaba will capture Dragon using the space station’s robotic arm. Ground controllers will then send commands to robotically install the spacecraft on the station’s Harmony module.

The Dragon spacecraft will spend approximately one month attached to the space station, returning to Earth Jan. 6, with results of previous experiments.

The deadline for media to apply for accreditation for this launch has passed, but more information about media accreditation is available by contacting Jennifer Horner at 321-867-6598 or jennifer.p.horner@nasa.gov.

For the latest schedule of prelaunch briefings, events and NASA TV coverage, visit:

https://www.nasa.gov/content/spacex-crs-13-briefings-and-events

Learn more about the SpaceX CRS-13 mission at:

https://www.nasa.gov/spacex

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #15 on: 12/02/2017 12:49 PM »
Window opens at midday, but while SpaceX has been hitting the top of the window lately at 39A, it's less likely with the first prop load at 40 after the repairs.

This thread - updates - to be used for photos of 40 when they rollout, etc. Discussion thread for.....err, discussion :)

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #16 on: 12/02/2017 02:06 PM »
Per L2, Static Fire now moved to NET Monday.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #17 on: 12/02/2017 10:52 PM »
Quote
The TEL was raised @SpaceX #pad40 ca 1PM today Sat 12/2/17-as I was watching from Titusville, FL. Bird flew overhead this view. Static fire test apparently delayed to Mon ahead of Fri Dec 8 target launch of #CRS13 cargo mission for @NASA to @Space_Station #ISS. Cred: @ken_kremer

https://twitter.com/ken_kremer/status/937086552186015744

Online Chris Bergin

Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #18 on: 12/02/2017 11:06 PM »
Let's add one of our photos for a bit of a closer look at the new TEL.

Tweeted this out:
https://twitter.com/NASASpaceflight/status/937110378928013312

Still working on the new TEL at SLC-40 today. Back to vertical.

Needs to be lowered to horizontal, rolled back and then the Falcon 9 booster is mated in the HIF. Rollout. Power On. Prop Load. Ignition. Still NET Monday for the Static Fire test for CRS-13.

NSF Member photo.

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Re: SpaceX Falcon 9 : CRS-13 : Dec 8, 2017 : UPDATES
« Reply #19 on: 12/03/2017 07:05 PM »
Article from Friday about expected CRS-13 static fire and future increasing launch cadence:

http://www.floridatoday.com/story/tech/science/space/2017/12/01/spacex-cape-canaveral-test-fire-help-company-increase-rocket-launch-rate-nasa-iss-crs-13-florida/913240001/

Includes interesting info on some pad changes to increase resilience:

Quote
improvements to Launch Complex 40 include protection of hardware with steel and concrete casings as well as a transition to underground infrastructure.

General Monteith thinks these would also enable a much quicker recovery (2 months) in the event of another catastrophic failure at the pad.

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