Author Topic: SpaceX Falcon 9 : Merah Putih (Telkom 4) : August 7, 2018 - DISCUSSION  (Read 41078 times)

Offline vaporcobra

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1050
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Liked: 1841
  • Likes Given: 2234
So, thats gonna be Block 5?

After CRS-15, every orbital launch will be Block 5.

Online ZachS09

So, thats gonna be Block 5?

After CRS-15, every orbital launch will be Block 5.

Unless the Inflight Abort Test uses Core B1042, which is a Block 4 model.
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline lonestriker

  • Member
  • Posts: 35
  • Houston We Have A Problem
  • Liked: 29
  • Likes Given: 38
So, thats gonna be Block 5?

After CRS-15, every orbital launch will be Block 5.

Unless the Inflight Abort Test uses Core B1042, which is a Block 4 model.

That flight won't go orbital, so vaporcobra is correct still.

Online ZachS09

I understand that; however, I was making a statement based on the earlier model in general whether the plan was to go orbital or suborbital.
« Last Edit: 06/06/2018 02:31 AM by ZachS09 »
"Liftoff of Falcon 9: the world's first reflight of an orbital-class rocket."

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3502
  • US
  • Liked: 2844
  • Likes Given: 1715
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE (From SSL)

June 21, 2018

Maxar’s SSL ships first of three advanced communications satellites scheduled to launch on the SpaceX Falcon 9 this summer

Commercially driven advances help SSL customers to connect people and transform lives around the world

Palo Alto, Calif. – SSL, a Maxar Technologies company (formerly MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd.) (NYSE: MAXR, TSX: MAXR), today announced it shipped the first of three satellites that SSL will deliver to the SpaceX launch base at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida over the next month. Driven by commercial advances, the three satellites will bring communications capability to connect people and transform lives around the globe.

Telstar 19 VANTAGE, an advanced high throughput satellite (HTS) built for Telesat, one of the world’s leading satellite operators, marks the 50th SSL-built communications satellite to launch this decade. It arrived safely at the launch base this week for a launch scheduled next month.

Two more SSL communications satellites are scheduled to ship to SpaceX launch base over the next month including a second HTS for Telesat, Telstar 18 VANTAGE, and the Merah Putih satellite (previously known as Telkom-4), for Indonesia’s largest telecommunication and network provider, PT Telkom Indonesia (Persero) Tbk.

“SSL has a long legacy of leveraging its commercial mindset to provide satellite operators with spacecraft systems that address their requirements and enable global transformation,” said Dario Zamarian, group president, SSL. “The cadence this month of shipping out three satellites for launch demonstrates our ongoing market leadership and commitment to quality, reliability, and performance.”

Telstar 19 VANTAGE

Telstar 19 VANTAGE is one of a new generation of Telesat spacecraft designed to serve today’s bandwidth intensive applications. It will support a range of services, including advanced broadband connectivity for consumer, enterprise and mobility users across the Americas and Atlantic from its prime orbital location of 63 degrees West, the same location used today by Telesat’s Telstar 14R.

Like all Telesat VANTAGE satellites, Telstar 19 VANTAGE combines broad regional beams and powerful HTS spot beams enabling customers to maximize throughput and spectral efficiency while optimizing network performance. Its Ka-band HTS capacity will serve Telesat customers operating in Northern Canada, the Caribbean, the North Atlantic Ocean, and South America. Additional Ku-band HTS spot beams will serve growing South American markets in Brazil and the Andean region. Telstar 19 VANTAGE will also bring new Ku-band broadbeam capacity over the North Atlantic Ocean enhancing Telesat’s coverage of this important mobility market.

Telstar 18 VANTAGE

Telstar 18 VANTAGE, the third HTS in Telesat’s global fleet, will be located at 138 degrees East, an ideal position for connecting Asia to the Americas. It will replace and expand on the capabilities of Telesat’s Telstar 18 satellite through its extensive C-band coverage of Asia, its Ku-band HTS spot beams over Indonesia and Malaysia, and its six additional Ku-band regional beams. These high performance beams will enable Telstar 18 VANTAGE to meet growing demand for mobility, enterprise networks and telecom services across the Asia region. As previously announced, Telesat has partnered with APT Satellite of Hong Kong in the design and procurement of this spacecraft, which APT calls Apstar-5C. 

“Telesat has worked closely with SSL and the Maxar family of companies for many years and we are pleased to have collaborated with them on our newest Telstar VANTAGE high throughput satellites,” said Dan Goldberg, President and CEO of Telesat. “These state-of-the-art spacecraft are going to provide important competitive advantages for our customers across the Americas and Asia. It’s great news that Telstar 19 VANTAGE is now at the launch base and that Telstar 18 VANTAGE is nearly finished and in the queue to ship.”

Merah Putih

Merah Putih, a name which represents the red and white of the Indonesian flag, will be integrated into Telkom’s greater telecommunications network to provide service throughout the 17 thousand islands of the Indonesian archipelago, as well as India and other parts of South and Southeast Asia. Satellite forms the telecommunications backbone that connects Indonesia, along with other technologies, such as submarine cable.

Merah Putih, which was completed ahead of schedule, will replace Telkom-1, at 108 degrees East, where it will expand on Telkom’s coverage to serve new markets. Its all C-band payload will enhance both internet and telephone service for populations in remote regions and offload backhaul for cellular service.

“Satellite plays a vital role in our telecommunications infrastructure,” said Mr. Mr. Zulhelfi Abidin, Chief Technology Officer of Telkom. “SSL has been an excellent spacecraft supplier and has completed the satellite construction ahead of schedule. We look forward to traveling to Florida to see the satellite launch later this summer.”

I did a Google search on Telkom 4 yesterday and was wondering why I got an article about a red and white satellite.

Offline ChrisGebhardt

  • Assistant Managing Editor
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6859
  • ad astra scientia
  • ~1 AU
  • Liked: 5408
  • Likes Given: 674
Quote
HAWTHORNE, Calif. – June 29, 2018. Media accreditation is now open for SpaceX's Merah Putih (Telkom 4) mission from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The launch is targeted for no earlier than August.   
 
A Falcon 9 rocket will deliver Merah Putih to a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO).

Online zubenelgenubi

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1570
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Liked: 394
  • Likes Given: 1169
Given the current capabilities of the Eastern Range, safety procedures, etc., what's the minimum amount of time allowed between a launch of a Falcon 9 from SLC-40 and a Delta-IV (Heavy) from SLC-37?
Support your local planetarium!

Offline vaporcobra

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1050
  • Tacoma, WA
  • Liked: 1841
  • Likes Given: 2234
Given the current capabilities of the Eastern Range, safety procedures, etc., what's the minimum amount of time allowed between a launch of a Falcon 9 from SLC-40 and a Delta-IV (Heavy) from SLC-37?

Range-wise, CCAFS was unwilling to do a SpaceX and ULA launch within 24 hours of each other. Maybe that's changed, but it's a good baseline.

Offline guckyfan

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6711
  • Germany
  • Liked: 1759
  • Likes Given: 1728
Given the current capabilities of the Eastern Range, safety procedures, etc., what's the minimum amount of time allowed between a launch of a Falcon 9 from SLC-40 and a Delta-IV (Heavy) from SLC-37?

Range-wise, CCAFS was unwilling to do a SpaceX and ULA launch within 24 hours of each other. Maybe that's changed, but it's a good baseline.

Wasn't it the other way around? The range was willing but ULA was not happy with it. Or do I remember wrong?

Edit: Fixed quote
« Last Edit: 06/30/2018 06:22 AM by guckyfan »

Online jjyach

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 120
  • Denver, CO
  • Liked: 505
  • Likes Given: 41
Well ULA had an Atlas at the pad with a sensitive and important payload atop of it, so it made sense for all not to take the possible risk from launching from a pad so close, especially if there had been a falcon launch issue, and that who knows what effects even a successful launch might have on that payload.

Offline High Bay 4

  • Member
  • Posts: 17
  • Chicago
  • Liked: 3
  • Likes Given: 46
The question is if Merah Putih doesn’t get off the ground by 8/4 does SpaceX have to stand down and PSP get Range priority?

Offline hopalong

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 109
  • Milton Keynes
  • Liked: 54
  • Likes Given: 36
The question is if Merah Putih doesn’t get off the ground by 8/4 does SpaceX have to stand down and PSP get Range priority?

I would say PSP get priority as they would have booked that date first, also it is more launch window sensitive than Merah Putih.
« Last Edit: 06/30/2018 02:38 PM by hopalong »

Offline ChrisGebhardt

  • Assistant Managing Editor
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6859
  • ad astra scientia
  • ~1 AU
  • Liked: 5408
  • Likes Given: 674
The question is if Merah Putih doesn’t get off the ground by 8/4 does SpaceX have to stand down and PSP get Range priority?

I would say PSP get priority as they would have booked that date first, also it is more launch window sensitive than Merah Putih.

To answer the 3 questions:

1. Time between two launches of different rockets (i.e. not 2 Falcon 9s or a Falcon 9 and Falcon Heavy) is max 36hrs to reconfigure the range between a Falcon 9 and an Atlas V or Delta IV.  Can be done in less time because of the Falcons AFTS.

2. It was ULA that nixed the two launches within ~24hrs.  Air Force wanted it; SpaceX wanted it.  ULA did NOT want it only because Falcon 9 would have launched first and ULA didn't want their rocket on the while an F9 launched.  So it didn't happen because of that.

3. If SpaceX has Range for 8/2 and PSP has Range for 8/4, then PSP has Range priority for the dates ULA has requested for it, likely 8/4 and prime and 8/5 as backup.  This is how the Range has always worked.  If delays happen and Falcon 9 and Delta IVH end up wanting the same day, negotiations between SpaceX, ULA, NASA, and Range will happen to see who gets the slot.  But as ULA and SpaceX and NASA say routinely, "we all play nice with this because next time it could be us trying convince the other to give up a slot."
« Last Edit: 06/30/2018 03:38 PM by ChrisGebhardt »

Online zubenelgenubi

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 1570
  • Arc to Arcturus, then Spike to Spica
  • Commonwealth of Virginia
  • Liked: 394
  • Likes Given: 1169
To follow-up on the PSP launch window:
PSP has a limited planetary launch window, to make its first delta-V flyby (of seven) of Venus.  According to the PSP project web site, http://parkersolarprobe.jhuapl.edu/ , that window is July 31-August 19.  Launch was delayed from July 31 to August 4.
Support your local planetarium!

Offline Comga

  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4244
  • Liked: 1490
  • Likes Given: 1227
Given the current capabilities of the Eastern Range, safety procedures, etc., what's the minimum amount of time allowed between a launch of a Falcon 9 from SLC-40 and a Delta-IV (Heavy) from SLC-37?

The post previous to yours is titled “August 2018”  and you changed it to “August 2, 2018”.
Where did we learn of the specific day?
Was that from Ben Cooper (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43418.msg1834312#msg1834312)?

edit/gongora: fixed url
« Last Edit: 06/30/2018 06:36 PM by gongora »
What kind of wastrels would dump a perfectly good booster in the ocean after just one use?

Offline gongora

  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3502
  • US
  • Liked: 2844
  • Likes Given: 1715
The post previous to yours is titled “August 2018”  and you changed it to “August 2, 2018”.
Where did we learn of the specific day?
Was that from Ben Cooper (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43418.msg1834312#msg1834312)?

I changed it, based on Ben Cooper's information (which publicly confirmed other sources of information).

Offline ChrisGebhardt

  • Assistant Managing Editor
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 6859
  • ad astra scientia
  • ~1 AU
  • Liked: 5408
  • Likes Given: 674
The post previous to yours is titled “August 2018”  and you changed it to “August 2, 2018”.
Where did we learn of the specific day?
Was that from Ben Cooper (https://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=43418.msg1834312#msg1834312)?

I changed it, based on Ben Cooper's information (which publicly confirmed other sources of information).

The FCC applications requested a day advancement of the launch to 2 Aug 2018

Offline Ragmar

  • Member
  • Posts: 89
  • Space is the Place
  • Liked: 16
  • Likes Given: 35
Any idea what booster this could go on?

Online Jakusb

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 831
  • NL
  • Liked: 591
  • Likes Given: 289
Any idea what booster this could go on?
At this moment all seems to indicate that this one will fly on 1049.
This core
Likely will hit the road as soon as 1047 successfully launches.

Offline soltasto

Any idea what booster this could go on?
At this moment all seems to indicate that this one will fly on 1049.
This core
Likely will hit the road as soon as 1047 successfully launches.

It could as well be already at the cape. It was on the McGregor test stand on Jun 20 and it was probably tested a few days later.

Tags: