Author Topic: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018  (Read 29889 times)

Online SkipMorrow

Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #180 on: 05/21/2018 04:03 PM »
I was at the launch, watching from the NASA viewing area. This was my first night launch (not counting ORB-3, which was twilight, and exploded). Holy WOW! The way the entire sky was lit up was amazing! Enthusiastic crowd, and a great show from Orbital-ATK, and everyone else involved. Thank you for your hard work. Well done!

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #181 on: 05/21/2018 04:07 PM »
More NASA photos

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #182 on: 05/21/2018 04:32 PM »
Interesting note from the post flight press conference.  Cygnus will perform a small re-boost of the station.  A followup question indicated no Dragon reboost capability is planned.
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online jacqmans

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #183 on: 05/21/2018 04:45 PM »
May 21, 2018
RELEASE 18-037

NASA Sends New Research on Orbital ATK Mission to Space Station


Astronauts soon will have new experiments to conduct related to emergency navigation, DNA sequencing and ultra-cold atom research when the research arrives at the International Space Station following the 4:44 a.m. EDT Monday launch of an Orbital ATK Cygnus spacecraft.

Cygnus lifted off on an Antares 230 rocket from NASA’s Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia on Orbital ATK’s ninth cargo mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract. The spacecraft is carrying about 7,400 pounds of research equipment, cargo and supplies that will support dozens of the more than 250 investigations underway on the space station.

NASA astronauts Scott Tingle and Ricky Arnold will use the space station’s robotic arm to capture Cygnus when it arrives at the station Thursday, May 24. Live coverage of the rendezvous and capture will air on NASA Television and the agency’s website beginning at 3:45 a.m. Installation coverage is set to begin at 7:30 a.m.

Included in the cargo in the pressurized area of Cygnus is a centuries-old method of celestial navigation. The Sextant Navigation investigation will explore the use of a hand-held sextant for emergency navigation on missions in deep space as humans look to travel farther from Earth. The ability to sight angles between the Moon or planets and stars offers crews another option to find their way home if communications and main computers are compromised.

Monitoring crew health and the biological environment of the space station, and understanding long-term effects of space travel on both, are critical to NASA’s plans for long-duration, deep space exploration. The Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST) study is the agency’s next step toward advancing in-space DNA sequencing technologies that can identify microbial organisms living on the space station and understanding how the DNA of humans, plants and microbes are affected by microgravity.BEST will use a process that sequences DNA directly from a sample, with minimal preparation, rather than using the traditional technique of growing a culture from the sample.

In the realm of modern physics, the new Cold Atom Lab (CAL) on Cygnus could help answer some big questions. CAL creates a temperature 10 billion times colder than the vacuum of space, then uses lasers and magnetic forces to slow down atoms until they are almost motionless. In the microgravity environment of the space station, CAL can observe these ultra-cold atoms for much longer than possible on Earth. Results of this research could lead to a number of improved technologies, including sensors, quantum computers and atomic clocks used in spacecraft navigation.

Cygnus is scheduled to depart the station in July with several tons of trash and burn up during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere, over the Pacific Ocean. The vehicle is named after James “J.R.” Thompson, a leader in the aerospace industry.

For more than 17 years, humans have lived and worked continuously aboard the International Space Station, advancing scientific knowledge and demonstrating new technologies, making research breakthroughs not possible on Earth that will enable long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space. A global endeavor, more than 200 people from 18 countries have visited the unique microgravity laboratory that has hosted more than 2,400 research investigations from researchers in 103 countries.

Get breaking news, images and features from the space station on social media at:

https://instagram.com/iss

and

https://www.twitter.com/Space_Station

Offline Ragmar

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #184 on: 05/21/2018 05:30 PM »
Following this mission, I was looking at the manifest.  It looks like we have OA-10 coming up later this year.  However, do we know if OATK still plans to exercise the Atlas V flight it bought for OA-11 in Spring of next year?

Offline FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #185 on: 05/21/2018 06:15 PM »
Quote
Orbital ATK #Antares launch vehicle pushes #Cygnus and 3,350 kgs of science and supplies destined for @Space_Station, @OrbitalATK #OA9

Here the view from my remote camera this morning @SpaceflightIns @nasahqphoto

https://twitter.com/timelapsejunkie/status/998626790720589826

Offline Sam Ho

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #186 on: 05/21/2018 07:22 PM »
Following this mission, I was looking at the manifest.  It looks like we have OA-10 coming up later this year.  However, do we know if OATK still plans to exercise the Atlas V flight it bought for OA-11 in Spring of next year?
As per Frank DeMauro's comments in the OA-8 prelaunch press conference, all Cygnus missions through OA-13 are planned for Antares.
Quote
“We are ready to respond to our customer’s needs, if they should require something different, but for all of the rest of CRS-1 and so far for the CRS-2 missions we’re planning to do them on Antares.”
http://spacenews.com/orbital-atk-looks-to-antares-to-handle-cargo-resupply-missions/

Offline topopesto

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #187 on: 05/21/2018 08:44 PM »
Interesting article!

I did not know that was an unpressurized version of Cygnus; are there any drawings?

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #188 on: 05/21/2018 09:41 PM »
Interesting article!

I did not know that was an unpressurized version of Cygnus; are there any drawings?
It is a flat unpressurized logistics carrier similar to those flown on Shuttle and ISS (ESP and ELC). It was also offered during CRS-1 but never selected to fly.

Offline brickmack

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #189 on: 05/22/2018 12:42 AM »
http://space.skyrocket.de/img_sat/cygnus-ucm__2.jpg

Outdated, at minimum there would be UltraFlex arrays to match the Enhanced PCM variant, but thats the general idea

Offline DatUser14

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #190 on: 05/22/2018 12:51 AM »
Quote
Orbital ATK #Antares launch vehicle pushes #Cygnus and 3,350 kgs of science and supplies destined for @Space_Station, @OrbitalATK #OA9

Here the view from my remote camera this morning @SpaceflightIns @nasahqphoto

https://twitter.com/timelapsejunkie/status/998626790720589826
Tweet has been deleted.
Titan IVB was a cool rocket

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #191 on: 05/22/2018 05:40 AM »
Congratulations to Orbital ATK and NASA for the successful launch! The launch was at a decent time for me (6:14 pm), but I had to attend an AIAA meeting that was scheduled to start at 6 pm.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline topopesto

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #192 on: 05/22/2018 06:01 PM »
Thank you for the reply!

Offline brickmack

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #193 on: 05/22/2018 09:03 PM »
I found a video that I think that picture came from, much better quality.

Offline AS_501

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #194 on: 05/22/2018 09:16 PM »
"CAL creates a temperature 10 billion times colder than the vacuum of space."
The next time you're showing an ISS pass to your neighbors or friends, make sure to point that station will contain (from time to time) the coldest matter in the Solar System, far colder than the Lunar South Pole, Pluto etc.   :)

Offline edkyle99

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #195 on: 05/22/2018 09:47 PM »
Does anyone know which first stage was used for this flight?

 - Ed Kyle

Offline ZachS09

Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #196 on: 05/22/2018 09:59 PM »
Does anyone know which first stage was used for this flight?

 - Ed Kyle

I was under the assumption that this first stage was the same one that did the static fire test in May 2016.
Because the Falcon Heavy Test Flight was successful, it has inspired thousands of people to consider changing the future of space travel.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #197 on: 05/23/2018 01:44 AM »
Nice overhead ISS pass in darkening twilight.  No joy on Cygnus.  Not sure I'm getting up at 4am for the next pass...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jcm

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #198 on: 05/23/2018 02:31 AM »
https://www.orbitalatk.com/news-room/feature-stories/OA9-Mission-Page/Documents/OA-9_FactSheet.pdf

Quote
Once Cygnus is unberthed, a NanoRacks deployer will release seven Cubesats.
Quote
Mission Duration: 2-4 days ascent and phasing
Up to 90 days berthed 
Up to 2 weeks post-ISS departure mission/experiment operations, descent and reentry

Here is the NASA mission summary which hasn't been linked to before on this thread
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/orbital_atk_crs-9_overview_high_res_rev12.pdf

It says there are 132 kg of EVA equipment on board. Does this include an EMU?
« Last Edit: 05/23/2018 02:32 AM by jcm »
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

Offline deruch

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Re: Cygnus OA-9 - Antares - May 21, 2018
« Reply #199 on: 05/23/2018 09:00 AM »
https://www.orbitalatk.com/news-room/feature-stories/OA9-Mission-Page/Documents/OA-9_FactSheet.pdf

Quote
Once Cygnus is unberthed, a NanoRacks deployer will release seven Cubesats.
Quote
Mission Duration: 2-4 days ascent and phasing
Up to 90 days berthed 
Up to 2 weeks post-ISS departure mission/experiment operations, descent and reentry

Here is the NASA mission summary which hasn't been linked to before on this thread
https://www.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/atoms/files/orbital_atk_crs-9_overview_high_res_rev12.pdf

It says there are 132 kg of EVA equipment on board. Does this include an EMU?

I assumed it was the cameras and hardware for EVA 51.  Or would that be considered "Vehicle Hardware"? 
Shouldn't reality posts be in "Advanced concepts"?  --Nomadd

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