Author Topic: Soyuz-2-1B Kosmos (Lotos-S № 4) Plesetsk - October 25, 2018 (00:15 UTC)  (Read 20643 times)

Offline Nicolas PILLET

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Cosmos 2455 apppears to have stopped doing orbital manoeuvres and began slow orbital decay when Cosmos 2503 was launched.

IIRC, Cosmos 2455 was a prototype (Lotos-S, 14F138). Cosmos 2503 and Cosmos 2524 are operational Lotos-S1 (14F145) satellites.
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Offline Star One

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Has there been any indication as to how many are needed for a complete constellation?

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Offline Artyom.

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Soyuz 2.1B rocket at the launch complex!

Photo from the VK page of Igor Ageenko (Russian TV).


Offline Steven Pietrobon

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The window has opened. Not sure if the launch is at the beginning of the window or later.
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Liftoff "in a few hours" according to Anatoly Zak.

https://twitter.com/RussianSpaceWeb/status/1055209240036548608
bit.ly/SpaceLaunchCalendar ☆ bit.ly/SpaceEventCalendar

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Anatoly's article says that fueling of the rocket began at 23:40 Moscow Time (20:40 UTC). Anyone know the usual time from start of fuelling to liftoff?
« Last Edit: 10/24/2018 10:11 pm by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Online starbase

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Fueling of Soyuz usually starts at L-5 hours according to my sources, which would place liftoff at ~1:40 UTC on Oct. 25.

Edit: L-5 time is for Soyuz FG, not sure if 2.1b has a shorter timeline.
« Last Edit: 10/24/2018 10:42 pm by starbase »
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And of course the key will be not just launch confirmation, but mission success confirmation.
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Offline smoliarm

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Anatoly's article says that fueling of the rocket began at 23:40 Moscow Time (20:40 UTC). Anyone know the usual time from start of fuelling to liftoff?
For Soyuz 2 fueling starts at -4.5 hrs, so liftoff should be around 1:10 AM UTC

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline tehwkd

TASS reporting liftoff at 0015 UTC https://tass.ru/kosmos/5716772

Not saying launch success because russian sites love to claim full success before it's actually confirmed.
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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Bing translation of Tass article.

Launch vehicle Soyuz-2.1 b  With spacecraft launched from Plesetsk Cosmodrome
Rocket successfully withdrew the spacecraft in the interests of the Russian Defense Ministry
Mikhail Japparidze/TASS

Moscow, October 25. /TASS/. Launch of the launch vehicle Soyuz-2.1 b  With spacecraft in the interests of the Ministry of Defense of Russia was carried out on Thursday in 03:15 MSK with a launcher № 4 site № 43 of the state test spaceport Plesetsk combat calculation space troops vks. This was reported in the Department of Information and Mass Communications of the military department.

 "General direction of launch of Space rocket (LV) " Soyuz-2.1 b  "was carried out by the Commander of Space Forces-Deputy commander-in-Chief of air-space Forces Colonel-General Alexander Golovko, arrived at the cosmodrome To control the preparation and launch of the spacecraft  "-said in a statement.

According to the Ministry of Defense, all pre-launch operations and the start of the RKN  "Soyuz-2.1 b " were held in normal mode. The means of the ground automated control complex carried out control of launch and flight of the booster.

The launch vehicle successfully withdrew the spacecraft in the interests of the Russian Defense Ministry, the department said.

 "Launch of the launch vehicle Soyuz-2.1 b " and the removal of the spacecraft into orbit were in normal mode  "-said in the Ministry of Defense.

This is the third launch of the Soyuz-2 launch vehicle, which was launched in 2018 from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome. The previous one was carried out on June 17.

Flight tests of the space rocket complex Soyuz-2 started at the North Cosmodrome on November 8, 2004. Over the past 14 years there has been conducted 34 launch of launch vehicles Soyuz-2  "Stages of modernization 1a, 1b and 1v.

RKN  "Soyuz-2 " replaced the "Soyuz-u " launchers, which were operated at the Plesetsk Cosmodrome from 1973 to 2012. During this period there were carried out 435 launches of RKN  "Soyuz-u ", during which the orbit was deduced about 430 spacecraft of various purposes.
« Last Edit: 10/25/2018 12:39 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

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Offline Steven Pietrobon

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Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Steven Pietrobon

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William Graham's article!

https://www.nasaspaceflight.com/2018/10/russia-soyuz-flight-lotos-s1-mission/

The article says that there were two Lotos-S launches. Is there a source for that? Gunter's Space Page says there had only been one. The operational launchers are Lotos-S1.

https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/lotos-s.htm
« Last Edit: 10/25/2018 01:23 am by Steven Pietrobon »
Akin's Laws of Spacecraft Design #1:  Engineering is done with numbers.  Analysis without numbers is only an opinion.

Offline Artyom.

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Online zubenelgenubi

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Is there a pattern developing that indicates a replacement satellite, or will this be an addition to a pattern by adding a new element to a satellite constellation?
AFAIK it is the same generation and is in addition to previous sats. Kosmos 2455 was a prototype sat and this launch will place the next operational sat in the constellation.
Cosmos 2455 appears to have stopped doing orbital manoeuvres and began slow orbital decay when Cosmos 2503 was launched.
IIRC, Cosmos 2455 was a prototype (Lotos-S, 14F138). Cosmos 2503 and Cosmos 2524 are operational Lotos-S1 (14F145) satellites.

Edited table
Lotos launch dates/times (all launches on Soyuz LV's from Plesetsk):

Kosmos 2455     11/20/2009, 10:44 UTC     Lotos-S        (currently inert)
Kosmos 2503     12/25/2014, 03:01 UTC     Lotos-S1 #1
Kosmos 2524     12/02/2017, 10:43 UTC     Lotos-S1 #2
Kosmos 2528     10/25/2018, 00:15 UTC     Lotos-S1 #3

Table correction made 10/25

Has there been any indication as to how many are needed for a complete constellation?
The newest satellite will be an additional member to a Lotos constellation, not a replacement?
« Last Edit: 10/26/2018 02:05 am by zubenelgenubi »
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Offline tehwkd

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