Author Topic: Expedition 58 Thread  (Read 23681 times)

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18170
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3781
  • Likes Given: 209
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 02/12/2019 09:02 am »
Amateur radio contact between David Saint-Jacques and Lloydminster students

Lloydminster, Alberta, February 12, 2019 — As part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will connect with Lloydminster students and answer their questions on February 13, live from the International Space Station (ISS).

ARISS is an international program aimed at inspiring students worldwide to pursue interests and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through amateur radio communications opportunities with the ISS crew. During David Saint-Jacques’ mission, Radio Amateurs of Canada hopes to establish as many as 20 contacts between the astronaut and youth, both in Canada and around the world.

Media are invited to witness this exchange in person.

 
Date:           February 13, 2019
 

Time:           1:00 p.m. MT – beginning of the event

                     1:10 p.m. MT – beginning of the connection with David Saint-Jacques


What:          Amateur radio contact between Earth and space

 
Who:           David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

                 600 students from kindergarten to Grade 9

 
Where:        College Park School (use the front entrance)

                 2115 56 Avenue

                 Lloydminster, AB  T9V 2W2

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 02/12/2019 06:36 pm »
Exercise Research and Biology Hardware Checks Aboard Orbital Lab

Mark Garcia Posted on February 12, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew explored space exercise and checked out biology hardware today aboard the International Space Station. The space residents supplemented their research activities and kept the orbital lab systems in tip-top shape.

Daily exercise in space is important so astronauts can fight muscle and bone loss caused by living in weightlessness. Doctors are seeking to optimize workouts for crews to stay in shape for strenuous activities like spacewalks, returning to Earth and adjusting to gravity.

Anne McClain of NASA contributed to that research today strapping into an exercise bike while attached to breathing tubes and sensors. Scientists measured her breathing and aerobic capacity to understand the effects of microgravity on pulmonary function and physical exertion.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques worked on a pair of incubators throughout Tuesday. He disconnected hardware in the Kubik incubator that houses small biology studies in the Columbus lab module. Afterward, he glided into the Kibo lab module and set up a carbon dioxide meter inside the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory supporting a wide variety of life sciences.

The commander, Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos, worked primarily in the station’s Russian segment on Tuesday beginning the day working on life support gear. The highly experienced cosmonaut then moved onto space navigation research before charging the emergency phone inside the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/12/exercise-research-and-biology-hardware-checks-aboard-orbital-lab/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 02/13/2019 02:58 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/11/2019

Astrobee: The crew participated in a conference with the Astrobee payload developer to discuss details of the docking station installation preparation. Following this, they configured and prepared the JEM Astrobee docking station location. The actual docking station installation is currently planned for Friday of this week. When all the hardware arrives on orbit, Astrobee will consist of three self-contained, free flying robots and a docking station for use inside the ISS. The robots are designed to help scientists and engineers develop and test technologies for use in microgravity to assist astronauts with routine chores, and give ground controllers additional eyes and ears on the space station. The autonomous robots, powered by fans and vision-based navigation, perform crew monitoring, sampling, logistics management, and accommodate up to three investigations.

Fluids Integrated Rack Light Microscopy Module (FIR/LMM) Biophysics 5-2 plate exchange: Following the completion of the planned science for plate s/n 2002, the crew removed it from the PACE (Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment) LED Base inside the LMM (Light Microscopy Module) AFC (Auxiliary Fluids Container), installed plate s/n 2006, and dispensed oil on the plate. Initial inspection via ground commanding shows 2 of the 4 capillaries in plate 2006 are cracked and the team is assessing a forward plan. LMM/Biophysics-5-2 looks at the relationship between solution convection – the movement of molecules through the fluid – and dense liquid clusters from which protein crystals can form. The main objective of the investigation is to understand why protein crystallization experiments in microgravity have often generated unexpectedly low or high numbers of crystals. Both of these outcomes may negatively affect experiments designed to obtain a small number of well-separated crystals for x-ray structure studies.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Flush: In preparation for a Fan Pump Separator (FPS) R&R next Monday, the crew performed a cooling loop flush on the EMU 3006 today. In addition, they obtained a 60 mL sample from the Displays and Control Module (DCM) for chemical analysis. EMU 3006 FPS had failed to activate during a preventative maintenance activity on January 22.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 02/13/2019 02:59 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/12/2019

Human Research Facility (HRF) Urine Setup: The crew set up hardware in preparation for repository activities later this week.  Repository is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. It supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Space Acceleration Measurement System II (SAMS II) Screen Cleaning:  As part of the routine periodic maintenance, the crew cleaned lint from the filter screens in the SAMS-II RTS/D1 (Remote Triaxial Sensor Drawer 1) and RTS/D2 locations.  SAMS-II is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS resulting from the operation of hardware, crew activities, dockings, and maneuvering. Results generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the ISS.

Nitrogen / Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Tank Uninstall:  Today the crew worked with MCC-H to terminate the transfer of Nitrogen from the NORS Recharge Tank to the ISS Airlock Nitrogen Tanks.  As part of the activity, they removed the fill hose, regulator, then uninstalled and stowed the tank for return on a future cargo vehicle.

Compound Specific Analyzer – Combustion Products (CSA-CP) Sample Pump Failure:  During a scheduled inspection, the crew found that one CSA-CP Sample Pump was failed. The Sample Pump is needed to obtain CSA-CP samples at fire ports. Currently there is only one functional Sample Pump on ISS.  Ground teams are working to manifest a spare pump onboard an upcoming cargo vehicle.

Intra-Module Ventilation (IMV) Measurements:  Yesterday, the crew took periodic measurements of the airflow at IMV ducts in several locations, including Russian Segment to Node 3, Node 3 to Cupola, Airlock to Node 1, Lab to Node 2, Node 2 to Lab, Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) inlet and Node 3 to BEAM.  Teams are currently reviewing the data and will request cleaning if the airflow measurements are below pre-defined limits.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 02/13/2019 04:51 pm »
Crew Studies Human Body and Checks Cooling Systems

Mark Garcia Posted on February 13, 2019

Wednesday saw the Expedition 58 crew explore the inner workings of the human body in space and maintain cooling systems aboard the International Space Station.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain spent all day setting up cooling gear inside the U.S. Destiny lab module and Japan’s Kibo lab module. She drained and refilled water pumps inside the Fluid System Servicer and the Internal Thermal Control System. The life support systems help cool the station’s atmosphere and dispel heat generated by electrical systems.

Microgravity’s impact on the human physiology was the focus of Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques’ day. The Canadian Space Agency astronaut collected and stowed his breath, blood and urine samples for a variety of human research experiments. The research is supporting the long term-collection of human biological samples and observing bone marrow and blood changes.

Saint-Jacques also conducted ultrasound scans in the Zvezda service module for the Fluid Shifts study with assistance from Commander Oleg Kononenko and doctors on the ground. That research is seeking to reverse increased head and eye pressure that occurs in space.

Kononenko started Wednesday servicing Russian life support systems. The four-time station resident then spent the afternoon on more space research studying motion coordination, radiation exposure and crew psychology.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/13/crew-studies-human-body-and-checks-cooling-systems/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 02/14/2019 03:07 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/13/2019

ISS HAM Pass: The crew participated in the contact with College Park School, Lloydminster, Alberta, Canada. The students ranged from grade 1 to 8 and the questions involved astronaut experiences during launch, interactions with families, working on the ISS, etc. ISS Ham Radio provides opportunities to engage and educate students, teachers, parents and other members of the community in science, technology, engineering and math by providing a means to communicate between astronauts and the ground HAM radio units.

Team Task Switching (TTS) Experiment Survey: The crew completed a Team Task Switching Survey using the Data Collection Tool on a Station Support Computer. The objective of the TTS investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crewmembers have difficulty in switching tasks, and apply the results to both the reduction of any negative consequences and improvement of individual and team motivation and effectiveness.

Two-Phase Flow 2 Laptop Setup: The crew relocated the Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) laptop to a suitable area around the MSPR. Following this, the appropriate power cable and Local Area Network (LAN) cable connections were made. This is being performed as part of the preparation for the future Two-Phase Flow 2 investigation. The Two-Phase Flow experiment investigates the heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling in the microgravity environment. This experiment provides a fundamental understanding of the behaviors of bubble formation, liquid-vapor flow in a tube, and how heat is transferred in cooling systems.

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Fluid System Servicer (FSS) Lab and JEM Refill: The crew used the FSS to add ITCS coolant to the Lab Low Temperature Loop (LTL) Pump Package Assembly (PPA) accumulator and Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) ITCS Low and Moderate Temperature Loops. Once the refills were completed, they drained and stowed the FSS and associated jumpers.

Nitrogen (N2) / Oxygen (O2) Recharge System (NORS) Tank Installation: Today the crew installed a NORS O2 tank, mated the O2 Fill Hose to the NORS Manifold, and initiated a gas transfer to the High Pressure O2 System.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 02/14/2019 04:39 pm »
Research into How Space Impacts Humans and Physics Continues

Mark Garcia Posted on February 14, 2019

The three residents onboard the International Space Station today worked with a diverse array of science hardware. The trio continues to explore what living in space is doing to their bodies and helped scientists promote healthier humans in space and on Earth.

Astronauts have reported increased head and eye pressure during long-duration space missions. The Expedition 58 crew is researching that phenomenon today to help doctors reverse the upward fluid shifts that affect space residents.

One solution being studied is a special suit that draws fluids such as blood and water toward the lower body to prevent swelling in the face and elevated head and eye pressure. Astronaut Anne McClain tried that suit on today and Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques used an ultrasound device to scan the activity. Commander Oleg Kononenko assisted the duo inside Russia’s Zvezda service module.

Afterward, McClain glided to the opposite end of the station in Japan’s Kibo lab module to work on the Two-Phase Flow fluid physics experiment. She set up and installed the research hardware inside Kibo’s Multi-purpose Small Research Rack. The experiment may enable engineers to design advanced thermal management systems for use on Earth and in space.

Saint-Jacques returned to biomedical studies today collecting and stowing more breath, blood and urine samples for later analysis. The ongoing research is helping scientists understand the long-term space impacts to bone marrow, red blood cells and the overall human physiology.

Saint-Jacques finally reviewed instructions to install a docking station on Friday for new cube-shaped, free-flying robots that will arrive at the station later this year. The Astrobee autonomous assistants may free up more science time for astronauts and allow mission controllers better monitoring capabilities.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/14/research-into-how-space-impacts-humans-and-physics-continues/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 02/15/2019 02:17 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/14/2019

Marrow: Today the crew collected breath, ambient air, and blood samples in support of the Marrow investigation.  Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow. One of the impacts seen on the ground is fat cells growing at the expense of blood-producing cells during prolonged stays in bed.  Blood-producing cells share the same confined space with fat cells within the bone marrow.

Fluid Shifts: The crew performed a repeat of the Fluid Shifts Chibis imaging session originally performed on 21-January-2019. The 21-January session experienced firewall-related video issues on the ground which resulted in a loss of ~33% of the science.  Fluid Shifts is a NASA investigation, divided into Dilution Measurements, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging with Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure). The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and prevention of eye damage.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Six-Month Maintenance: The crew completed the 6-month T2 inspection. During this task, the crew inspects the treadbelt slats and screws, cleans the treadmill drive shaft, and vacuums inside the rack and around the treadmill. An unmanned activation and checkout was completed succesfully. Engineering reviewed the data from this checkout and T2 is a Go for operations.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to the LAB Power and Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF). Then the SSRMS released Node 2 PDGF and the SSRMS was positioned for the MRM1 survey. At the same time, additional imagery was obtained for the Node 1 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Bolt 1-3. Once the MRM1 inspection was completed, the team maneuvered the arm to grapple Node 2 PDGF and released LAB PDGF, then parked the SSRMS and powered it down.

Online jacqmans

  • Moderator
  • Global Moderator
  • Senior Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18170
  • Houten, The Netherlands
  • Liked: 3781
  • Likes Given: 209
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 02/15/2019 02:21 pm »
February 15, 2019
MEDIA ADVISORY M19-009

Florida Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut Aboard International Space Station
 
University and high school students from Florida will have an opportunity to talk with a NASA astronaut on the International Space Station next week. The Earth-to-space call will air on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Anne McClain will answer questions from students at Florida Atlantic University and the Palm Beach County, Broward County, and Miami Dade school districts. The event will take place at 1:25 p.m. EST Friday, Feb. 19, at the Engineering East building of Florida Atlantic University’s Boca Raton campus, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Media interested in covering should contact Lisa Metcalf at [email protected] 561-297-3022.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics.) Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’sTracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).
Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 02/15/2019 03:57 pm »
Time Perception Studies, Free-Flying Robotics on Station Schedule

Mark Garcia Posted on February 15, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew is helping scientists today understand how astronauts perceive time and orient themselves when living in space. The orbital residents are also working on CubeSat and free-flying robotics hardware aboard the International Space Station.

Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques wore virtual reality gear for the Time Perception experiment sponsored by the European Space Agency. The study takes place in the Columbus lab module and is researching the hypothesis that time and depth perception are altered in microgravity.

McClain of NASA started the day inside the Kibo lab module, opened the airlock and removed the CubeSat deployer. She disassembled and stowed the hardware in Kibo’s logistics module after it ejected a series of CubeSats into Earth orbit in January.

Astrobee is a new experimental program that uses three small free-flying assistants and is due to begin operations soon. Saint-Jacques installed the Astrobee docking station in the Unity module where the cube-shaped robotic helpers will be able to attach themselves in the future. The autonomous free-flyers may be able to help astronauts with simple duties and enhance monitoring abilities on the orbital lab.

Commander Oleg Kononenko spent Friday morning exploring how crew activities and the Earth’s magnetic field impact the structure of the space station. The experienced cosmonaut moved into the afternoon replacing dust filters before researching space navigation techniques.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/15/time-perception-studies-free-flying-robotics-on-station-schedule/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 02/19/2019 02:21 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/15/2019

Astrobee: Today the crew participated in a final crew conference, followed by the Docking Station installation in the JEM.  When the satellites arrive on orbit (starting with the NG-11 vehicle), Astrobee will consist of self-contained, free flying robots and a docking station for use inside the ISS. The robots are designed to help scientists and engineers develop and test technologies for use in microgravity, to assist astronauts with routine chores, and give ground controllers additional eyes and ears on the space station. The autonomous robots, powered by fans and vision-based navigation, perform crew monitoring, sampling, logistics management, and can accommodate up to three investigations

Nanoracks CubeSats Deployer (NRCSD) Removal: The crew removed the CubeSat Deployers from the MPEP (Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform), removed the MPEP and Passive Capture Mechanism from JEM Air Lock (JEMAL) Slide Table, and removed the MPEP Adapter Plate.  These are clean-up activities following the successful NRCSD-15 CubeSat deployment on January 31 and prepare the JEMAL for the next user.  The NRCSD is a self-contained CubeSat deployer system for small satellites staged from the ISS.

Time Perception: Using a head-mounted Oculus Rift display, headphones, finger trackball and laptop computer, the crew performed the Tim Perception science sessions.  A program on the laptop induces visual and audio stimuli to measure a subject’s response to spatial and time perception in a microgravity environment. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 02/19/2019 02:23 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/18/2019

Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient (SODI-DSC): Today, a crewmember changed-out the memory flash disk from the SODI hardware. The Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient (SODI-DSC) experiment will study diffusion in six different liquids over time in the absence of convection induced by the gravity field.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM): Today, a crewmember relocated the SSC18 laptop from the FGB to the Node 1 for use by the EarthKAM payload. EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Fan Pump Separator Remove and Replace (R&R): On January 22, the FPS in EMU 3006 would not activate during a planned loop scrub activity. Today, the failed FPS was removed from EMU 3006 and replaced with an on-orbit spare. Following the R&R, the crew was able to prime the Water Pump and reconfigure the EMU. On Wednesday, the crew will perform a Return to Service Checkout on EMU 3006 as well as perform an EMU Data Recorder (EDAR) installation.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 02/19/2019 11:39 pm »
Experimental Fuel Hardware, Astrophysics and Life Science Fill Crew Day

Mark Garcia Posted on February 19, 2019

The International Space Station is hosting a robotic experiment that may help enable and refuel future missions to the moon and Mars. The Expedition 58 crew installed that hardware today then worked on a variety of life science, astrophysics and combustion science gear.

The Robotic Refueling Mission-3 (RRM3) experiment will demonstrate transferring and storing fuels and coolants such as liquid methane and a cryogenic fluid in space. Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques installed the RRM3 hardware today inside Japan’s Kibo lab module airlock. The gear will be deployed outside Kibo then transferred to an external logistics carrier. Once there, the Dextre “robotic hand” will begin operations demonstrating fluid transfers with a set of specialized tools.

The two astronauts also split their time conducting maintenance on a pair of space incubators. McClain worked on a mouse habitat replacing filters inside Kibo’s Cell Biology Experiment Facility. Saint-Jacques swapped a carbon dioxide controller in the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL). SABL supports research into microorganisms, small animals, animal cells, tissue cultures and small plants.

McClain also replaced a laptop computer hard drive dedicated to the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 experiment. The experiment is housed on the on the station’s truss structure and searches for antimatter, dark matter and measures cosmic rays. She later cleaned up gear supporting gaseous flame studies inside the Combustion Integrated Rack.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 59 crew members are a month away from joining the three orbital residents aboard the space station. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch are in Star City, Russia in final training before their March 14 launch to the orbital lab.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/19/experimental-fuel-hardware-astrophysics-and-life-science-fill-crew-day/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 02/20/2019 02:47 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/19/2019

Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3): Today crewmembers installed the RRM3 hardware on the JEM Airlock slide table. Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3) demonstrates the first transfer and long term storage of liquid methane, a cryogenic fluid, in microgravity. The ability to replenish and store cryogenic fluids, which can function as a fuel or coolant, can help enable long duration journeys to destinations like the Moon and Mars.

JAXA Mouse Mission: Today a crewmember attached Odor filters into the Mouse habitat Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) unit in preparation for upcoming SpaceX-17 mission. The purpose of this mission is to analyze any alterations of the gene expression patterns in several organs and the effects on the germ-cell development of mice exposed to a long-term space environment.

Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL): Today a crewmember replaced CO2 Incubator Controllers into SABL1 and SABL2. CO2 levels inside the SABLs were then measured. The Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL) supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has over 23 liters of temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures and has two USB 2.0 ports and two Ethernet LAN connections. It also has switchable 28vdc and 5vdc power supplies for experiment use.

CSA Comm and Outreach (CSA Video): Today a crewmember recorded two Educational outreach video events. Prime objective is to document and support communications and outreach activities related to the Canadian space program and the ISS utilization in particular.

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)-02: Today a crewmember replaced the Ultrabay hard drive on the AMS dedicated Laptop. AMS-02 is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector that uses the unique environment of space to advance knowledge of the universe and lead to the understanding of the universe’s origin by searching for antimatter, dark matter and measuring cosmic rays.

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): Today the crew removed ACME hardware items from storage and consolidated them with other ACME hardware. The ACME experiment series being performed in the CIR includes five independent studies of gaseous flames. The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 02/20/2019 04:26 pm »
Astronauts Focus on Spacesuits, High-Temp Physics and Storm Photography

Mark Garcia Posted on February 20, 2019

Spacesuit servicing and high-temperature physics kept the crew busy today aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 astronauts also researched meteorology from the station and explored more Earth phenomena from space.

Astronaut David Saint-Jacques is returning a U.S. spacesuit to service today inside the U.S. Quest airlock. He verified successful installation of suit components and checked for water leaks in the suit at full operational pressure. NASA is planning a set of maintenance spacewalks at the station planned for March 22, 29, and April 8.

In the Kibo lab module from Japan, astronaut Anne McClain cleaned sample cartridges in a specialized thermo-physical research device called the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace. The high-temperature facility levitates, solidifies and melts samples that may contribute to the synthesis of new materials difficult to achieve on Earth.

She later set up camera hardware for the Tropical Cyclone experiment to demonstrate storm predictions from the station. McClain targeted a moonlit Typhoon Oma today off the coast of Queensland, Australia from inside the cupola.

Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on a suite of science experiments Wednesday in the Russian segment of the station. The veteran cosmonaut photographed terrestrial landmarks to document forest conditions and the effects of natural and man-made disasters. He also studied how space impacts the cardiovascular system and the piloting skills of a cosmonaut.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 59 crew members are preparing for their March 14 launch to the orbital lab aboard the Soyuz MS-12 crew ship. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch are in Star City, Russia for final training before heading to the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan on Feb. 26.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/20/astronauts-focus-on-spacesuits-high-temp-physics-and-storm-photography/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 02/21/2019 02:47 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/20/2019

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): Today a crewmember cleaned the sample holder and installed a sample cartridge into the ELF facility. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

TROPICAL CYCLONE: Today a crewmember performed the Tropical Cyclone camera setup to capture imagery of Typhoon Oma in the Pacific Ocean through the Cupola. The Cyclone Intensity Measurements from the ISS (Tropical Cyclone) investigation demonstrates the feasibility of studying powerful storms from space, which would be a major step toward alerting populations and governments around the world when a dangerous storm is approaching.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Fan Pump Separator Return to Service Checkout: The crew performed an extensive checkout of the newly installed FPS by performing a gas leak test at the maximum operating suit pressure and a long-duration water leak test. The checkout was considered successful with no leaks detected. On January 22, the FPS in EMU 3006 failed to activate during a planned loop scrub activity.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Data Recorder (EDaR) Install: The crew successfully installed EDaR onto EMU 3006. EDaR is a new system that provides real-time data storage from EMU systems and increases the rate in which EMU telemetry is sent to ground controllers.

Robotics Operations: Overnight, Ground Robotic Controllers commanded the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to walkoff from Node 2 to the Mobile Base System (MBS) and pick up the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). This is in preparation for Materials International Space Station Experiment-Flight Facility (MISSE-FF) troubleshooting operations that are scheduled on Thursday, February 21. On December 31, 2018, MISSE-FF lost health and status data during commanding to prepare the platform for installation of new MISSE Sample Carriers (MSCs). This troubleshooting will have the SPDM soft-dock four MSCs one at a time to see if health and status returns.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 02/21/2019 06:39 pm »
Virtual Reality Filming, Spacesuit Work Highlight Day on Station

Mark Garcia Posted on February 21, 2019

Virtual Reality Film, Spacesuit Work Highlight Day on Station

Virtual reality filming and spacesuit cleaning highlighted the day aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 crew also configured a diverse array of life science and physics hardware.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain set up a virtual reality camera inside the Tranquility module after lunch today. She has been filming hours of footage this month depicting a first-person’s view of life throughout the station. The final film will be an immersive, cinematic experience to educate audiences on Earth about life in space.

McClain started the day installing mouse habitat gear inside the Cell Biology Experiment Facility. The research device, located in Japan’s Kibo lab module, will house mice for an upcoming accelerated aging and disease study.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques was back on spacesuit duty today scrubbing cooling loops and checking the conductivity of water samples. The astronaut from the Canadian Space Agency also tested cables inside the Materials Science Research Rack. The refrigerator-sized rack explores chemical and thermal properties of materials such as metals, alloys and polymers to create new and improved elements and applications.

In the Russian segment of the orbital lab, Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on ventilation systems and collected air samples from the Zarya and Zvezda service modules. The veteran cosmonaut also photographed hardware for a blood pressure study and tested Earth observation techniques using a camera equipped with small ultrasound emitters.

Back on Earth in Star City, Russia, three Expedition 59 crew members have wrapped up two days of classes and tests qualifying for their March 14 launch to the orbital lab. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch will end their stay at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on Feb. 26 and fly to the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan. The trio will lift off inside the Soyuz MS-12 crew ship and take a six-hour ride to their new home in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/21/virtual-reality-filming-spacesuit-work-highlight-day-on-station/

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 02/22/2019 01:20 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/21/2019

The ISS Experience: Today a crewmember performed the ISS Experience camera setup in the Node-3 to capture a recording session of nominal crew activities. The ISS Experience creates a virtual reality film documenting daily life aboard the space station. The 8 to 10 minute videos created from footage taken during the six-month investigation cover different aspects of crew life, execution of science aboard the station, and the international partnerships involved.  The ISS Experience uses a Z-CAM V1 Pro Cinematic VR (Virtual Reality) 360-degree camera with nine 190° fisheye lenses.

Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1): Today a crewmember performed troubleshooting steps for the MSRR facility in order to verify connectivity between the facility and the Master Controller. The MSRR-1 is used for basic materials research in the microgravity environment of the ISS. MSRR-1 can accommodate and support diverse Experiment Modules (EMs). Many material types, such as metals, alloys, polymers, semiconductors, ceramics, crystals, and glasses, can be studied to discover new applications for existing materials and new or improved materials.

JAXA Mouse Mission: A crewmember performed a configuration change for the upcoming SpaceX-17 mission. This involved installing new ammonia sensors and the Micro-G interface units and setting the connections to allow the ground to perform checkouts. The purpose of this mission is to analyze any alterations of the gene expression patterns in several organs and the effects on the germ-cell development of mice exposed to a long-term space environment.

Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) 3006 Loop Scrub, and Iodination: Following this week’s Fan Pump Separator replacement, the crew performed EMU 3006 water loop scrub and then acquired and tested water samples for conductivity. EMU Loop Scrubs are required preventive maintenance needed to remove any chemical and biological contaminants from the EMU transport loop.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator Replacement:  Today the crew reported that the Check Pump Separator indicator light could no longer be cleared using troubleshooting procedures. Ground specialists declared the hardware failed and the crew completed the replacement using an on-board spare.  The Pump Separator and WHC System is now performing nominally.

Robotic Operations:  Yesterday afternoon, the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm2 as required to un-stow the Robot Micro Conical Tool #2 (RMCT2) from the SPDM Tool Holder Assembly (THA). Then they maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and SPDM to the start position for the Material on ISS Experiment (MISSE) troubleshooting activities scheduled later today.

Online Rondaz

  • Full Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 567
  • Liked: 224
  • Likes Given: 129
Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #138 on: 02/25/2019 03:04 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/22/2019

SpaceX Demo-1 Dragon2 Training: The crew utilized a computer based trainer and reviewed procedures to refresh themselves with Dragon2 systems, rendezvous and docking, ingress operations, changes to emergency responses, and vehicle departure. SpaceX Demo-1 mission is the first unmanned demonstration flight to the ISS for the Dragon2 spacecraft. The vehicle is planned to launch from KSC atop of a Falcon 9 Block 5 rocket on March 2 at 1:48AM CT. An autonomous rendezvous and docking with manual override ability is set to occur the following day on March 3. Undocking and splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean is planned for March 8. This unmanned demonstration flight will set the stage for crewed missions in the future.

Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) Light Microscopy Module (LMM) Biophysics: Today a crewmember accessed the FIR/LMM and examined the Auxiliary Fluids Container to assess damage of the Biophysics Plate 3 capillaries and to provide the ground with photography. Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work. Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. The Effect of Macromolecular Transport on Microgravity Protein Crystallization studies why this is the case, examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

CIR (Combustion Integrated Rack): Today a crewmember performed O2 bottle exchanges in the CIR rack facility Manifold 2 and 4 in preparation for upcoming test runs. The CIR includes an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel and oxidizer control, and five different cameras for performing combustion experiments in microgravity.

JEM Regenerative Heat Exchanger (RHX) Hose Insulator Installation:  Today, the crew installed an insulator to the JEM RHX hose to prevent condensate water from accumulating. Last July, the crew observed approximately 200 mL of water on the flex hose connected to the RHX within the JEM starboard endcone. The new hose insulator was subsequently manifested and flown onboard Northrop Grumman (NG)-10.

Offline eeergo

-DaviD-

Tags: