Author Topic: Expedition 58 Thread  (Read 17804 times)

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 01/10/2019 03:09 pm »
Dragon’s Return to Earth Delayed Till Sunday

Mark Garcia Posted on January 10, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft had its stay extended at the International Space Station a few more days. Mission managers observed inclement weather at Dragon’s splashdown site in the Pacific Ocean and decided against Dragon’s return to Earth today.

Meanwhile, Dragon’s hatch remains open and the Expedition 58 crew is tending to time-sensitive experiments targeted for return and analysis back on Earth. The Canadarm2 robotic arm has the Dragon firmly in its grips while the cargo vehicle is still attached to the Harmony module.

Robotics controllers will command the Canadarm2 to uninstall Dragon from Harmony on Saturday afternoon then slowly maneuver the U.S. space freighter to its release position. The Canadarm2 will then be commanded to release Dragon Sunday at 3:36 a.m. EDT as astronaut Anne McClain monitors from the cupola. NASA TV will broadcast the departure live without commentary starting Sunday at 3:15 a.m.

Today, the three space station residents are back on science and maintenance duties with Dragon poised for a weekend departure. McClain of NASA is checking out and preserving the space research meant for return inside Dragon.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency assisted McClain first thing Thursday morning. He then moved on to the Vascular Echo study scanning his leg’s femoral artery with an ultrasound device to understand how living in space affects the cardiovascular system.

Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko explored ways to improve piloting techniques in space and participated in a psychological assessment. The four-time station resident also maintained Russian life support systems aboard the orbital lab.

Back on Earth, NASA and SpaceX are continuing to work on the activities leading toward the Demo-1, uncrewed flight test to the International Space Station. NASA and SpaceX are now targeting no earlier than February for the launch of Demo-1 to complete hardware testing and joint reviews. NASA and SpaceX will confirm a new target date after coordination with the Eastern Range and the International Space Station Program.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/10/dragons-return-to-earth-delayed-till-sunday/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 01/10/2019 05:40 pm »
Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques talks with Saskatchewan students from orbit

January 10, 2019 – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

The University of Saskatchewan’s student-run event Spectrum 2019 opened this morning with a special appearance from Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques – from space! More than 300 participants, including 200 grade 6–9 students from schools across Saskatchewan, had the unique opportunity to interact with Saint-Jacques, who is living and working aboard the International Space Station until June 2019.

Veteran Canadian astronaut and Saskatoon native Dr. Dave Williams was also present for the event. He talked about his own space flight experience and the incredible power of space to inspire and engage the next generation of explorers. Participants listened attentively as Williams and Saint-Jacques exchanged stories about living in orbit. A group of high school students then had a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to ask questions to astronaut David Saint-Jacques in space.

Quick facts


·         Spectrum is a triennial student-run event that inspires, educates, and promotes exploration in science, technology, and engineering. From January 10 to 13, Spectrum 2019 will feature displays, interactive exhibits, workshops, competitions, and speakers that explain and showcase scientific concepts and technological innovations.

·          To engage young Canadians in science and related disciplines, the CSA is coordinating and collaborating with partners to deliver a wide variety of activities and contests during David’s mission. Here are some examples:

o    Contest – Bring space to your school: Canadian schools are invited to enter a contest to host an event with CSA astronaut David Saint-Jacques while he is in space! Deadline for submissions is February 28, 2019.

o    Radi-N2 and You: While David measures radiation levels aboard the ISS as part of the Radi-N2 experiment, classrooms across Canada can do the same on Earth. 

o    Astro Pi challenge: Develop your own code, and it may run on the Space Station! Two different complexity levels make Astro Pi accessible to students with or without coding experience.

Quotes

“Several years ago, driven by curiosity and a passion for science and technology, I studied engineering to understand how things worked. I now have the humbling privilege to live this extraordinary adventure. It is the most incredible opportunity to keep learning and to gain a new and rare perspective on our planet, our universe and humanity.”

David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

“It’s a very special day for me to see a fellow Canadian, David Saint-Jacques, in space, as I was there more than 10 years ago. As a Saskatoon native, I am pleased to see so many local students raising their eyes to space and seeing how science can open doors to new horizons!”

Dave Williams, former CSA astronaut

“The Spectrum team is very excited to kick off our event with a live stream with David! This is an incredible opportunity for us to partner with the CSA in our shared mission of promoting education and exploration in science and engineering!” 

Gillian Leach, Cameco Spectrum 2019 Coordinator and civil engineering student at University of Saskatchewan

Offline Lewis007

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 01/11/2019 04:35 am »
Video of St-Jacques' Q&A with Saskatchewan school kids.


« Last Edit: 01/11/2019 04:36 am by Lewis007 »

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 01/11/2019 05:49 pm »
Station, SpaceX Managers Set Dragon Release For Sunday Afternoon

Mark Garcia Posted on January 11, 2019

To take advantage of calmer sea states in a different location in the Pacific Ocean, SpaceX and the International Space Station Program agreed to move the departure of the SpaceX-CRS-16 Dragon cargo craft from the station from early Sunday morning to late Sunday afternoon, setting up the first night splashdown and recovery of a Dragon vehicle.

Dragon’s hatch will be closed Sunday morning, and the spacecraft will be detached from the Harmony module around 3 p.m. EST Sunday.

Ground controllers will now release Dragon from the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 6:30 p.m. Sunday. NASA TV coverage of the operation without commentary will begin at 6:15 p.m. NASA Flight Engineer Anne McClain will monitor the release from the station’s cupola.

Dragon’s deorbit burn to begin its descent back to Earth is now scheduled at approximately 11:19 p.m. with splashdown scheduled at around 12:10 a.m. Monday (9:10 p.m. Pacific time) just west of Baja California.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/11/station-spacex-managers-set-dragon-release-for-sunday-afternoon/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 01/12/2019 07:07 am »
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 11, 2019

Governor General and Prime Minister to Hold Videoconference with
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques

OTTAWA—Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will host a videoconference with Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques on Monday, January 14, 2019, at 10 a.m. from Rideau Hall.

A group of students will also participate in the videoconference and have the opportunity to ask the astronaut questions about his experience in space.

David Saint-Jacques flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on December 3, 2018—his first mission to space. During his time aboard the ISS, which is set to be the longest stay for a Canadian, he will carry out scientific experiments, perform robotics tasks and test new technologies.  For more information about the mission, visit www. asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/missions/expedition58/default.asp.

This event will be pooled for media. For more information, please contact the Parliamentary Press Gallery at 613-992-6517. Media covering the event must arrive at the Princess Anne Entrance no later than 9:30 a.m. on the day of the ceremony.


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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 01/13/2019 11:15 pm »
ISS configuration after Dragon-16 departure.
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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #68 on: 01/13/2019 11:37 pm »
Dragon Released to Return Science and Supplies Back to Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on January 13, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft was released from the International Space Station today at 6:33 p.m. EST. Robotics controllers remotely commanded the Canadarm2 robotic arm to let go of the U.S. space freighter sending it on a solo trajectory back to Earth.

Astronaut Anne McClain monitored the activities from the cupola and watched Dragon perform a series of departure burns as it separated itself to a safe distance from the orbital lab. Integrated operations between mission controllers in Houston and SpaceX controllers in California stop when Dragon reaches a point about one kilometer away from the station.

SpaceX personnel will retrieve Dragon after it parachutes to a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean Monday at 12:15 a.m. (9:15 p.m. Sunday Pacific time) then tow it to port in southern California. This will be the first nighttime splashdown and recovery for the Dragon with plenty of moonlight to track its entry.

The commercial cargo vessel is taking home a variety of critical space research that will immediately be picked up by NASA engineers and distributed to scientists across the nation. Station hardware will also be extracted for analysis, refurbishment or discarding.

Dragon completes a 36-day mission attached to the station’s Harmony module after delivering more than 5,600 pounds of science and supplies on Dec. 8. Today’s departure leaves four spacecraft, including Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo craft, attached to the space station.

The next Dragon mission to the space station will be its first uncrewed demonstration mission designated SpaceX DM-1. The Commercial Crew Program’s first launch is currently targeted for February and will demonstrate ground systems, orbit to docking activities and landing operations.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/13/dragon-released-to-return-science-and-supplies-back-to-earth/
« Last Edit: 01/13/2019 11:50 pm by SMS »
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Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #69 on: 01/14/2019 03:56 pm »
Dragon Back on Earth as Crew Revs Up Station Science

Mark Garcia Posted on January 14, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is back on Earth after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean Sunday night loaded with critical space research and International Space Station hardware. Four spaceships remain parked at the orbital lab including Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus resupply ship from the United States.

Today, the three-member Expedition 58 crew is exploring a wide array of microgravity science to improve life for humans on Earth and in space. The orbital residents also worked on life support systems and upgraded computer hardware.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain set up a specialized microscope in the morning for the Biophysics-5 study to research the production of protein crystals. Afterward, she deactivated Dragon communications gear then swapped out hard drives on several laptop computers.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack and replaced optics gear inside the flame and soot research device. He later swapped a hydrogen sensor inside the Oxygen Generation System before inspecting and cleaning some of its parts.

A pair of tiny internal satellites, better known as SPHERES, were set up by Commander Oleg Kononenko today inside the Kibo laboratory module. High school students write algorithms and submit them in a competition to control the SPHERES to demonstrate spacecraft maneuvers and formation-flying for future space missions.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/14/dragon-back-on-earth-as-crew-revs-up-station-science/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #70 on: 01/15/2019 10:25 pm »
Station Trio Practices Emergency Before Radiation, Physics Research

Mark Garcia Posted on January 15, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew members started Tuesday with an emergency drill before splitting up for more space research and hardware maintenance.

Commander Oleg Kononenko led Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques through a simulated emergency this morning aboard the International Space Station. The trio practiced communication and coordination with Mission Control Centers in Houston and Moscow.

The unlikely emergency scenarios the crew trains for include events such as depressurization, ammonia leaks and fires. Responses include quickly donning safety gear, closing a module hatch to isolate pressure and ammonia leaks, extinguishing a fire and evacuating the station aboard the Soyuz crew ship.

McClain then moved on to cable and parts work on the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) that can house a variety of smaller experiments. She wrapped up the day photographing Saint-Jacques as he installed neutron detectors for an experiment to understand how space radiation impacts astronauts.

Kononenko worked today on the Electromagnetic Levitator that exposes materials to extremely high temperatures to explore their thermo-physical properties in the microgravity environment. The four-time station cosmonaut later went on to routine maintenance on life support systems in the orbital lab’s Russian segment.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/15/station-trio-practices-emergency-before-radiation-physics-research/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #71 on: 01/16/2019 05:06 pm »
Astronauts Study Head and Eye Pressure, Wearable Body Monitor

Mark Garcia Posted on January 16, 2019

Human research took precedence aboard the International Space Station today as the Expedition 58 crew explored how astronauts adapt to living in space. The orbital residents also performed more ordinary roles as computer technicians and plumbers.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain is studying today the fluid shifts from an astronaut’s lower body to the upper body and how they pressure the head and eyes during a spaceflight. She collected her blood samples for the long-running experiment, spinning them in a centrifuge before stowing the samples in a science freezer.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques measured his blood pressure beginning operations with the new Bio-Monitor system from the Canadian Space Agency. The wearable device monitors an astronaut’s physiological data in real-time with minimum interference to crew activities.

McClain also had time to relocate and deploy a laptop computer from the Harmony module to the Columbus lab module. Saint-Jacques spent the rest of Wednesday afternoon replacing parts in the space station’s toilet located in the Tranquility module.

Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on Russian maintenance in the orbital lab before inspecting and photographing windows in the Russian modules. He wrapped up the day on a pair of ongoing Earth observation studies photographing natural and man-made phenomena.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/16/astronauts-study-head-and-eye-pressure-wearable-body-monitor/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #72 on: 01/17/2019 06:55 pm »
Crew Studies Space-Caused Eye Pressure and Cultural Differences

Mark Garcia Posted on January 17, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew focused again today on studying head and eye pressure changes astronauts experience while living in space. The crew then went on to more science hardware and life support maintenance aboard the International Space Station.

Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques worked throughout Thursday morning researching the upward flow of fluids that occurs inside astronauts’ bodies. The duo conducted eye scans with a variety of devices to measure eye pressure changes caused by these fluid shifts in microgravity.

McClain then spent the afternoon connecting cables and installing parts on the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) that houses small experiments in the Kibo lab module. Saint-Jacques replaced electronics gear in the Kubik incubator that enables research on seeds, cells and small animals in the Columbus lab module.

Commander Oleg Kononenko ensured the upkeep of life support gear and other station systems in the Russian segment of the orbital lab. The veteran cosmonaut of three previous Expeditions ended the day exploring how station crew members from around the world interact and learn to live together in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/17/crew-studies-space-caused-eye-pressure-and-cultural-differences/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #73 on: 01/18/2019 01:55 pm »
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques to explore Earth from space

Ottawa, Ontario, January 18, 2019 — During a live appearance from space, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will launch an interactive Web-based activity using pictures taken from space.

Dr. Roberta Bondar, the first Canadian woman in space and Jenni Sidey-Gibbons, CSA astronaut, will have a discussion with David Saint-Jacques during the event.

Media representatives who are unable to attend can watch the event live on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

Date:           January 22, 2019

Time:           11:20 a.m. ET

What:          Launch of interactive Web-based activity Exploring Earth

Who:           Dr. Roberta Bondar, former CSA astronaut

                 David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

Jenni Sidey-Gibbons, CSA astronaut

                 About 200 students in grades 5 and 6

Where:        Canada Science and Technology Museum

                 Auditorium

                 1867 St Laurent Boulevard

                 Ottawa, Ontario K1G 5A3

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #74 on: 01/18/2019 05:48 pm »
Tech Work and Life Science Ahead of Orbital Boost Today

Mark Garcia Posted on January 18, 2019

Satellite and combustion technology are being worked on today aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 crew also studied botany and psychology while the station raised its orbit in a planned reboost maneuver.

Anne McClain of NASA installed new SlingShot small satellite deployer gear inside the Cygnus space freighter. SlingShot will deploy small research satellites from Cygnus after it departs the space station’s Unity module in February and reaches a safe distance.

McClain also transferred biomedical hardware for the Fluid Shifts head and eye pressure study into the Zvezda service module for continuing research. She later worked in the Columbus lab module installing a light meter to measure the amount of light nourishing plants inside the Veggie botany facility.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack and configured hardware inside the flame and soot research device. The work is being done ahead of operations for the Advanced Combustion in Microgravity Experiments that encompass a set of five independent gaseous flames studies.

He later typed his mood, thoughts and emotions into an electronic journal for the Behavioral Core Measures experiment. The psychological study seeks to understand how the spacecraft environment, long-term separation from family and friends, loss of day-night cycle and other factors impact crew behavior.

In the Russian segment of the station, Commander Oleg Kononenko transferred fluids and packed trash into the docked Progress 70 (70P) cargo craft. The Progress resupply ship is due to undock from the Pirs docking compartment on Jan. 25.

A second docked Progress cargo craft, the 71P, fired its engines shortly after 1:01 p.m. EST to raise the station’s orbit.  The reboost comes in advance of upcoming cargo missions and the next crew launch in February.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/18/tech-work-and-life-science-ahead-of-orbital-boost-today/

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #75 on: 01/18/2019 06:01 pm »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/25943/
Google translation
Quote
The planned correction of the orbit of the ISS
In accordance with the flight program of the International Space Station (ISS), on January 18, 2019, a planned correction of the ISS orbit was performed. To conduct a maneuver at 21 hours 01 min. Moscow time, the propulsion system of the Progress MS-10 transport cargo ship docked to the ISS was switched on.The time of the propulsion system was 500 seconds. As a result, the station received a speed increment of 1 m / s.
According to the data of the ballistic-navigation support service, the Mission Control Center (MCC), the calculated parameters of the ISS orbit after the execution of the maneuver were:
- the minimum height above the Earth’s surface is 407.4 km,
- the maximum height above the Earth's surface is 422.2 km,
- period of circulation - 92.62 minutes,
- inclination of the orbit - 51.66 degrees.
The purpose of the correction was the formation of ballistic conditions for the flight of Russian transport ships.

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #76 on: 01/19/2019 08:18 pm »
The station experienced a POR (power on reset?) of power channel 3B overnight.  I woke up this morning and heard CAPCOM briefing the status of systems restoration progress to the crew.  Several other issues have been mentioned and addressed through the day with the latest being the crew unable to access the WiFi system on board...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #77 on: 01/22/2019 06:21 pm »
The SSRMS has done some work in the last hours. Anyone knows what they are doing?

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #78 on: 01/23/2019 03:02 pm »
The SSRMS is working today again.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #79 on: 01/23/2019 03:30 pm »
First amateur radio contact between David Saint-Jacques and Ottawa students

Ottawa, Ontario, January 23, 2019 — As part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will connect with Ottawa students and answer their questions on January 23, live from the International Space Station (ISS).

ARISS is an international working group, aimed at inspiring students worldwide to pursue interests and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through amateur radio communications opportunities with the ISS crew. During David Saint-Jacques’ mission, Radio Amateurs of Canada hopes to establish as many as 20 contacts between the astronaut and youth, both in Canada and around the world.

Media are invited to witness this exchange in person. Those unable to attend can listen to the discussions with David Saint-Jacques, starting at 2:45 p.m., live on this streamer.

 
Date:           January 23, 2019

Time:           2:00 p.m. ET – beginning of the event

                     2:45 p.m. ET – beginning of the connection with David Saint-Jacques

What:          Amateur radio contact between Earth and space

Who:           David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

                 More than 180 elementary students from Grades 4 to 8

Where:        Ashbury College Junior School

                 362 Mariposa Avenue

                 Ottawa, ON K1M 0T3


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