Author Topic: Expedition 58 Thread  (Read 17803 times)

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 12/28/2018 09:11 am »
The SPDM is waiting above the JEM-EF.
I suppose, that they are prepairing some work with the exchange of some MISSE sample carriers.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 12/28/2018 02:26 pm »
http://www.alphaspace.com/news/alpha-space-launches-its-first-misse-resupply-mission/
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Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance, LLC (Alpha Space) launched its latest set of MISSE carriers to the International Space Station on Nov. 17, 2018 aboard the Northrop Grumman NG-10 resupply mission.
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“This latest launch of carriers marks the company’s first MISSE resupply mission,” stated Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space president and CEO. “Our team integrated and delivered seven MISSE carriers with over 400 unique science and engineering experiments and tests for our customers, which include commercial enterprises, NASA, other government agencies, and educational programs.
Quote
Alpha Space expects its first returned carrier to arrive in Feb. of 2019.
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“Our next two launches are scheduled for May and November 2019”, shared Gittleman.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 01/02/2019 06:12 am »
It looks like the operation regarding the MSC exchange has started last night.
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119361543
At around 01:53 the hatch of the JEM-AL was opened, at around 01:59 the slide table was pulled out, then the MTT was picked up by the SPDM. At around 02:49 the MTT was pulled away from the slide table.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 01/02/2019 10:34 am »
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119373273
At around 02:52 one Dextre arm started the work on MISSE-FF. I suppose, it will deinstall one (ore more, or all) of the at the moment on MISSE-FF installed MSC´s.
(Can´t provide a picture, because I´m not on my own computer.)

Offline russianhalo117

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 01/03/2019 10:29 pm »
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119373273
At around 02:52 one Dextre arm started the work on MISSE-FF. I suppose, it will deinstall one (ore more, or all) of the at the moment on MISSE-FF installed MSC´s.
(Can´t provide a picture, because I´m not on my own computer.)
Doing R&R on a non MSC module. Will also install several MSCs.

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 01/04/2019 11:11 am »
Doing R&R on a non MSC module. Will also install several MSCs.
Jester has provided the details on L2.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 01/04/2019 09:36 pm »
Dragon Departing Station Next Week; Crew Studies Biology

Mark Garcia Posted on January 4, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is in its final week attached to the International Space Station’s Harmony module. Meanwhile, robotics experts on the ground and the crew aboard the lab are working a wide variety of science activities today.

The Dragon space freighter has nearly completed its cargo mission to replenish the orbital laboratory after delivering over 5,600 pounds of science and supplies Dec. 8. Dragon will return to Earth Jan. 10 for retrieval in the Pacific Ocean loaded with completed science experiments and used hardware for analysis.

New space exposure experiments are being remotely installed outside the station today using a specialized robotic hand known as Dextre. Also, astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques collected biological samples today for stowage and later analysis. The duo then split up for more science work including testing crew brain function and removing science hardware that explores stem cells and other biological processes.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/04/dragon-departing-station-next-week-crew-studies-biology/

Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 01/06/2019 06:53 am »
The USOS crew just had a morning DPC meaning Sunday is a work day, very unusual.  Apparently packing Dragon is the reason...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 01/06/2019 12:40 pm »

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 01/06/2019 12:46 pm »
These are EXP-57 photos  ;)

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 01/06/2019 01:23 pm »



Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 01/06/2019 01:44 pm »
CSA version:




BRoll Version:


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 01/07/2019 10:00 am »

Offline zubenelgenubi

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 01/07/2019 11:00 am »
Given this news:
https://ria.ru/20181224/1548548239.html
Google translate:
Quote
“In February of next year, the Canadian manipulator will take a platform with 2.5 tons of batteries, transfer it to a point below the station and send it into free flight. The platform with batteries will become the heaviest garbage ejected from the ISS,” the agency’s source said.
According to him, a similar operation on the ISS was done in July 2007, but then the tank with ammonia weighing 640 kilograms was dropped by the American astronaut Clayton Anderson, standing on the Canadian manipulator.
At the same time, the source stressed that it was decided not to throw the platform away from a good life.
“The platform with the new batteries was delivered to the station by a Japanese cargo ship in September. The replacement of batteries for the ISS was planned for October, but due to the emergency launch of the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, they were postponed to February 2019. The truck, which had to remove the platform with the old batteries, flew away from the station in November, "he said.
In this regard, the source continued, NASA decided to throw away the platform with the old batteries using a manipulator. There are no ecological aspects to history: the garbage will burn up in dense layers of the atmosphere, pollution will not arise, the source said.
It was reported that on December 21, with the help of a Canadian manipulator, the Japanese scientific equipment, weighing about half a ton, was thrown away from the station with the help of a Canadian manipulator.

Before the partial Federal government furlough, was there any further explanation of this operation will be executed?

Also, has there been any thought about the visual magnitude of the discarded platform + batteries, in terms of amateur satellite observation?

I remember that amateur astronomers were able to observe the lost tool-bag in orbit over ten years ago.
Support your local planetarium!

Offline Life_Support_32

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 01/08/2019 01:36 am »
Given this news:
https://ria.ru/20181224/1548548239.html
Google translate:
Quote
“In February of next year, the Canadian manipulator will take a platform with 2.5 tons of batteries, transfer it to a point below the station and send it into free flight. The platform with batteries will become the heaviest garbage ejected from the ISS,” the agency’s source said.
According to him, a similar operation on the ISS was done in July 2007, but then the tank with ammonia weighing 640 kilograms was dropped by the American astronaut Clayton Anderson, standing on the Canadian manipulator.
At the same time, the source stressed that it was decided not to throw the platform away from a good life.
“The platform with the new batteries was delivered to the station by a Japanese cargo ship in September. The replacement of batteries for the ISS was planned for October, but due to the emergency launch of the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, they were postponed to February 2019. The truck, which had to remove the platform with the old batteries, flew away from the station in November, "he said.
In this regard, the source continued, NASA decided to throw away the platform with the old batteries using a manipulator. There are no ecological aspects to history: the garbage will burn up in dense layers of the atmosphere, pollution will not arise, the source said.
It was reported that on December 21, with the help of a Canadian manipulator, the Japanese scientific equipment, weighing about half a ton, was thrown away from the station with the help of a Canadian manipulator.

Before the partial Federal government furlough, was there any further explanation of this operation will be executed?

Also, has there been any thought about the visual magnitude of the discarded platform + batteries, in terms of amateur satellite observation?

I remember that amateur astronomers were able to observe the lost tool-bag in orbit over ten years ago.
The EVAs to replace the batteries has not occurred yet due to the short handover period and visiting vehicle traffic. Once the EVAs have been performed, then the release of the old batteries will be planned.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 01/08/2019 02:24 am »
Dragon Packed With Science Before Thursday’s Departure

Mark Garcia Posted on January 7, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew members are packing the SpaceX Dragon space freighter ahead of its return to Earth on Thursday. Ground controllers are also readying communications gear and robotics systems prior to Dragon’s departure from the International Space Station.

Astronauts Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency are wrapping up final transfers of completed science experiments in Dragon today. The duo is loading science samples from several experiments for return to Earth, where they will quickly be delivered to investigators around the country for analysis.

Engineers on the ground are testing communications and control gear that will be used to monitor and command Dragon after its release from the station. Robotics controllers are also powering up the Canadarm2 robotic arm today to grapple Dragon before its removal from the Harmony module.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/07/dragon-packed-with-science-before-thursdays-departure/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 01/08/2019 01:49 pm »
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques opens student exposition Spectrum from space!

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, January 8, 2019 — On January 10, 2019, live from the International Space Station, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut  David Saint-Jacques will open Spectrum, a science exposition organized by the University of Saskatchewan, and will answer students’ questions.

Former Canadian astronaut Dave Williams, who is from Saskatoon, will be there to take part in the live exchange.

Media representatives are invited to attend. Those who are unable to go in person can watch the event in real time on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

Date:           January 10, 2019

Time:           9:00 a.m. CT

What:          Astronaut David Saint-Jacques opens Spectrum, a science exposition, and answers students’ questions

 
Who:           David Saint-Jacques, Canadian Space Agency astronaut

                 Dave Williams, former Canadian Space Agency astronaut

Where:        University of Saskatchewan

                 Convocation Hall

                 107 Administration Place

                 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan  S7N 5A2

   
For more information about the mission, visit the Canadian Space Agency’s website.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 01/08/2019 05:05 pm »
Crews Wraps Up Science Packing After Robotic Arm Grips Dragon

Mark Garcia Posted on January 8, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon space freighter is in the grips of the Canadarm2 robotic arm today as the Expedition 58 crew wraps up cargo transfers inside the vessel. The space trio is also on lab duty conducting a variety of microgravity research aboard the International Space Station.

Overnight, robotics controllers remotely commanded the Canadarm2 to grapple Dragon before its release from the Harmony module. Meanwhile, the hatches are still open and Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques continue loading time-critical space experiments inside the U.S. cargo craft.

The crew will shut the hatch to Dragon Wednesday and disconnect power cables. Then robotics controllers will take over, uninstall Dragon from Harmony overnight and maneuver it into release position. McClain will be in the cupola Thursday monitoring Dragon when it is released from the Canadarm2 around 4:35 a.m. EDT.

After its departure, Dragon will orbit Earth a few more hours before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern California. SpaceX personnel will retrieve Dragon and return it to port where NASA engineers will extract the precious cargo for immediate shipment to investigators around the country.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/08/crews-wraps-up-science-packing-after-robotic-arm-grips-dragon/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 01/09/2019 10:06 pm »
Astronauts and Robotics Experts Finalize Dragon Departure Work\

Mark Garcia Posted on January 9, 2019

The three Expedition 58 crew members have finished packing the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft with science experiments and hardware today. Final preparations for the vehicle’s departure are now on hold while teams wait for favorable weather in the splashdown area for Dragon’s return.

Dragon was scheduled for departure early Thursday morning from the International Space Station but mission managers made the decision to delay departure. Managers are assessing the backup release date of Sunday, Jan. 13 for Dragon’s return to Earth.

Robotics controllers maneuvered the Canadarm2 robotic arm Wednesday and grappled Dragon while it was still attached to the Harmony module. Prior to Dragon departure, they will remotely uninstall Dragon from Harmony and slowly guide it to its release position.

Astronaut Anne McClain will be in the cupola when robotics experts command the Canadarm2 to release Dragon finalizing its mission at the orbital lab. She’ll monitor its departure while her crewmates Commander Oleg Kononenko and Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques work on their daily science and maintenance tasks.

Dragon, which arrived at the station Dec. 8, will orbit Earth a few more hours on its own before reentering the atmosphere. It will parachute to a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern California where SpaceX personnel will retrieve the space freighter. They’ll deliver it to shore where NASA engineers will extract the precious cargo for immediate shipment to investigators around the country for analysis.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/09/astronauts-and-robotics-experts-finalize-dragon-departure-work/

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 01/10/2019 08:20 am »
The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor – ASIM – is performing well outside the European Columbus laboratory module on the International Space Station.

Launched in April 2018, the space storm-hunter is a collection of optical cameras, photometers and an X- and gamma-ray detector designed to look for electrical discharges born in stormy weather conditions that extend above thunderstorms into the upper atmosphere.

These ‘transient luminous events’ sport names such as red sprites, blue jets and elves.

Satellites have probed them and observations have even been made from mountain tops but because they occur above thunderstorms they are difficult to study in greater detail from Earth.

In contrast, the International Space Station’s low orbit covers a large part of Earth along the equator and is ideally placed to capture the sprites and jets.

ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen managed to catch the elves and sprites in action during his 2015 mission on board the International Space Station.

Now months into its commissioning, ASIM is performing well. Using data continuously collected by ASIM, researchers are investigating the relationship between terrestrial gamma-ray bursts, lightning and high-altitude electric discharges across all seasons.

Aside from being a little-understood phenomenon and part of our world, these powerful electrical charges can reach high above the stratosphere and have implications for how our atmosphere protects us from radiation from space.

ASIM is keeping researchers busy. Data collected so far have prompted eight presentations so far at the December meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the largest international gathering of Earth and space scientists.

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