Author Topic: Expedition 58 Thread  (Read 18529 times)

Online jacqmans

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Expedition 58 Thread
« on: 09/29/2017 02:08 pm »

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #1 on: 01/19/2018 09:37 pm »
Updated ISS Expedition 58 patch to reflect the shift of Serena Auñón-Chancellor to 55S and Anne McClain to 57S

« Last Edit: 05/01/2018 12:33 am by Moonbase_Alphan »

Online Olaf

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #2 on: 01/27/2018 01:08 pm »
https://twitter.com/AstroAnnimal/status/957206143767666688
Quote
Crew of Soyuz MS-11: @NASA Anne McClain, @roscosmos Oleg Kononenko, @csa_asc David Saint-Jacques

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #3 on: 05/24/2018 10:50 pm »
the updated patch
« Last Edit: 05/25/2018 03:57 pm by jacqmans »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #4 on: 06/04/2018 06:24 pm »
from: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html

Quote
June 18, Monday
2 p.m. – ISS Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference with Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin (All Channels)
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #5 on: 06/19/2018 06:40 pm »
Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference - June 18, 2018

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #6 on: 07/16/2018 03:01 pm »
Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques to give presentation at Ontario Science Centre

Longueuil, Quebec, July 16, 2018 — On Thursday, July 19, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint‑Jacques will give a presentation to visitors of the Ontario Science Centre. He will speak about his journey to become an astronaut and his training for Expedition 58/59, his upcoming mission on board the International Space Station that is scheduled to launch on December 20, 2018. 

Media representatives are invited to attend the presentation.


Date:           July 19, 2018

Time:           11:15 am ET

What:          CSA astronaut David Saint-Jacques gives a presentation on his journey and upcoming mission.

Where:        Ontario Science Centre

                 770 Don Mills Road

                 Toronto, ON  M3C 1T3

   
Contact information:

Canadian Space Agency
Media Relations Office
Telephone: 450-926-4370
Website: http://asc-csa.gc.ca
 

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #7 on: 08/24/2018 03:25 pm »
The CPC. ISS-57/58 crew successfully passed the manual docking and re-docking exam

The Cosmonaut Training Center named after Yu. A. Gagarin has a unique simulator complex that allows cosmonauts and astronauts to be trained in the management of a manned transport vehicle at each stage of the flight, simulate abnormal and emergency situations in order to work out their parrying actions. On one of these specialized simulators Don-Soyuz today passed the exam for manual berthing and reconnecting of the TPK Soyuz MS, the ISS-57/58 crew, which includes Cosmonaut Roskosmos Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Heig.
 
In the exam ticket - traditionally four modes. The first - redocking - is performed without any abnormal situations, since the mode itself immediately assumes manual control of the ship. Today, the crew pulled out a ticket with the option of re-docking, which is planned during the expedition to the International Space Station - from the MIM-2 module to the service module's service bay.
 
When the second mode was implemented, the mooring began with an abnormal situation in the on-board computer system, which the crew members quickly identified and switched to manual control in the analog circuit, docking was done in the shade. The complexity of the regime is that the crew must parry the separation, which is performed automatically after the failure of the computer system. For successful docking in the shade, the crew should approach the station at a distance of less than 80 meters - the range at which the ISS will be visible by the light of the ship's headlamp.
 
The third regime began with an automatic flight, then, after the instructor introduced an emergency situation - a collision accident - the crew switched to manual control in a discrete circuit. Alexey Ovchinin and Nick Haig responded quickly to an abnormal situation, confidently performed the flight manually and docked to the given node.
 
The fourth is a safety mode with a high speed of the ship and the introduction of such an abnormal situation as the failure of the on-board computer system. In this case, the crew's task is to switch to manual control in the analog circuit and ensure safe flight of the station, mooring and docking.
 
As a result of the examination, the commission noted the responsiveness of the astronaut and astronaut's response to the emerged contingencies, the competent execution of all modes in accordance with on-board documentation and the coordinated work of the commander and flight engineer who deservedly received excellent marks.

Offline Hog

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #8 on: 08/25/2018 11:11 am »
Is this launch still scheduled for December?
Paul

Offline SMS

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---
SMS ;-).

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #10 on: 08/26/2018 11:04 am »
https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html
Quote
September 8, Saturday   
2 p.m. – Space Station Crew News Conference (Kononenko, Saint-Jacques, McClain) (All Channels)

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #11 on: 08/30/2018 05:21 pm »
https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/media-invited-to-news-conference-with-nasa-astronaut-anne-mcclain-and-space-station
Quote
Aug. 30, 2018
MEDIA ADVISORY M18-128
Media Invited to News Conference with NASA Astronaut Anne McClain and Space Station Crewmates

NASA astronaut Anne McClain, along with her crewmates, Davis Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency and Oleg Kononenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, will discuss their upcoming mission to the International Space Station in a news conference at 2 p.m. EDT Thursday, Sept. 6, at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston.

The news conference will be broadcast live on NASA Television and on the agency’s website. The crew will be available afterward for in-person and remote media interviews.

The crew is scheduled to launch Dec. 20 aboard the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

McClain, Saint-Jacques and Kononenko will join the station’s Expedition 58 crew and will return to Earth in June 2019 as members of Expedition 59. This will be the first spaceflight for both McClain and Saint-Jacques. Kononenko will be making his fourth trip to the space station and will serve as the commander of Expedition 59.

U.S. reporters wishing to participate in the news conference in person or to reserve an in-person or telephone interview opportunity must contact Johnson's newsroom at 281-483-5111 by 4 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 5.

Reporters who wish to participate in the news conference by telephone must call Johnson's newsroom no later than 1:45 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 6. Those following the briefing on social media may ask questions using the hashtag #askNASA.

During a planned six-month mission, the crew will facilitate about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences. Among them, McClain is expected to take part in one of the first Tissues on Chips investigation, which will launch to the orbiting laboratory this fall aboard a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft. The experiment will use miniature models of living organ tissues on transparent microchips to replicate the complex biological functions of specific organs, thus enabling studies of the effects of reduced gravity on organs at the cell and tissue levels.

Science conducted on the space station continues to yield benefits for humanity and will enable future long-duration human and robotic exploration into deep space, including the Moon and Mars.

The crew also is scheduled to be in space during one of the uncrewed test flights of NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, which will resume human spaceflight launches from U.S. soil.

McClain, a native of Spokane, Washington, is a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army. As a senior army aviator, she has logged more than 2,000 hours in 20 different rotary and fixed-wing aircraft.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. She earned a master’s degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Bath, in England, and a master’s degree in international relations from the University of Bristol, also in England.

Follow McClain on Twitter at:

https://twitter.com/AstroAnnimal



Expedition 58 crew members Anne McClain of NASA (left), Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos (center) and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency (right) pose for pictures May 10 following their final Soyuz spacecraft qualification exams at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia.
Credits: NASA/Elizabeth Weissinger

« Last Edit: 08/30/2018 05:29 pm by SMS »
---
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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #12 on: 09/01/2018 06:04 pm »
https://twitter.com/Astro_Christina/status/1035892788502646785
Quote
First time suiting up crewmate @AstroAnnimal to go to vacuum. Hope not the last!

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #13 on: 09/07/2018 09:54 pm »
Quote
Canadian Space Agency

2018-09-06 - The Expedition 58/59 crew, including the next Canadian in space, David Saint-Jacques, are participating in a news conference at NASA.

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Offline Targeteer

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #14 on: 11/01/2018 06:24 pm »
NASA astronaut Anne McClain will be available at 9:30 a.m. EST Friday, Nov. 9, for live satellite interviews from Star City, Russia, before she launches to the International Space Station on her first spaceflight.

The interviews will air live on NASA Television and the agency’s website following video highlights of McClain’s training that begin at 9 a.m.

McClain and crewmates David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency and Oleg Kononenkoof the Russian space agency Roscosmos are targeted to launch from Baikonur, Kazakhstan, at approximately 6:31 a.m. (5:31 p.m. local time in Kazakhstan) Dec. 3.

To interview McClain, media must contact Mary Beth Boddeker at 281-483-2167 or [email protected] no later than 5 p.m. Wednesday, Nov. 7. Media participating in the interviews must tune to the NASA Television’s Media Channel (NTV-3). Satellite tuning information is available at:

http://go.nasa.gov/1pOWUhR

McClain and her crewmates currently are at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City preparing for their mission. After arriving at the station, they’ll join NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerstof ESA (European Space Agency), and Sergey Prokopyevof Roscosmos, bringing the station’s crew to six. There will be a short handover period before Auñón-Chancellor, Gerst and Prokopyev depart the station on Dec. 20. McClain, Saint-Jacquesand Kononenkoare scheduled to return to Earth in June.

During their six-month mission, the crew will facilitate about 250 research investigations and technology demonstrations not possible on Earth to advance scientific knowledge of Earth, space, physical and biological sciences.

Among them, McClain is expected to take part in one of the first Tissues on Chips investigations, which will launch to the station aboard a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft. This investigation will enable researchers to explore the effects of reduced gravity on organs at the cellular and tissue levels. In this research, the complex biological functions of specific organs are replicated using an advanced combination of miniature organ tissue models on transparent microchips. Such research on the space station yields benefits on Earth and will enable future long-duration human exploration into deep space, including the Moon and Mars.

The crew also is scheduled to be on station when NASA’s Commercial Crew partners conduct their first uncrewed test flights, bringing NASA a significant step closer to returning human spaceflight launches to U.S. soil.

A member of NASA’s 2013 astronaut class, McClain is a native of Spokane, Washington, and a lieutenant colonel in the U.S. Army. As a senior army aviator, she has logged more than 2,000 hours in 20 different rotary and fixed-wing aircraft.

McClain has a bachelor’s degree in mechanical and aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and a master’s degree in aerospace engineering from the University of Bath, in England, as well as a master’s degree in international relations from the University of Bristol, in England.

Follow McClain on social media at:
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #15 on: 11/10/2018 03:24 pm »
Quote
Expedition 58 Anne McClain Live Shots November 9, 2018

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Offline theonlyspace

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #16 on: 11/28/2018 07:47 pm »
Any word on when we will see the newest revised Expedition 58 patch after Soyuz MS 10 failure?

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #17 on: 11/29/2018 07:29 pm »
Latest update to the patch


Offline theonlyspace

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #18 on: 11/29/2018 10:25 pm »
ONLY  three crew for Expedition 58?  When the next crew arrive on Soyuz MS- 12 will that be Expedition 59?

Offline Tobias_Corbett

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #19 on: 11/30/2018 11:25 am »
ONLY  three crew for Expedition 58?  When the next crew arrive on Soyuz MS- 12 will that be Expedition 59?
What I was expecting is that that Soyuz MS-11 crew will operate alongside the current Expedition 57 crew until Soyuz MS-09 lands, and then Expedition 58 will start and just be a three person crew, then when Soyuz MS-12 arrives in March Kononenko, Saint-Jaque and McClain will just transfer over to Expedition 59. Kind of like when the entire three person Expedition 19 crew transferred over to the six person Expedition 20 crew when Soyuz TMA-15 arrived.
« Last Edit: 11/30/2018 11:35 am by Tobias_Corbett »

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #20 on: 11/30/2018 03:04 pm »
ONLY  three crew for Expedition 58?  When the next crew arrive on Soyuz MS- 12 will that be Expedition 59?

Expedition 58 will begin after Soyuz MS-09 undocking on December 20, Expedition 59 - after Soyuz MS-11 undocking on June 25, Expedition 60 - after Soyuz MS-12 undocking on October 3, Expedition 61 - after Soyuz MS-13 undocking on February 6.

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #21 on: 12/01/2018 04:56 pm »
 Expedition 58/Soyuz MS-11 Rollout to the Launch Pad, including interviews at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6637

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #22 on: 12/01/2018 05:39 pm »
The Soyuz MS  - IO  failure really messed up the Expedition numbering and crew members

Offline John44

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #23 on: 12/02/2018 08:26 pm »
Expedition 58 Pre-Launch Crew News Conference in Baikonur, Kazakhstan
http://www.space-multimedia.nl.eu.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=6638

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #24 on: 12/03/2018 02:40 pm »
New Crew Blasts Off Heading to Space Station Today

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2018

The Soyuz MS-11 launched from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station at 6:31 a.m. EST Monday, Dec. 3 (5:31 p.m. in Baikonur) and have safely reached orbit.  At the time of launch, the station was flying about 250 miles over central Kazakhstan southwest of the capital of Astana, 405 miles ahead of the Soyuz as it leaves the launch pad.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, and Oleg Konenenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos have begun their six-hour trip to the orbital laboratory where they will live and work for the next six-and-a-half months.

The arrival will briefly restore the station’s crew complement to six as they join Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Sergey Prokopyev of the Russian space agency Roscosmos, who are scheduled to remain aboard the station until Dec. 20.

Just days after their arrival, the crew members will capture the SpaceX Dragon cargo resupply spacecraft set to launch Tuesday from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and deliver more than 5,800 pounds of critical research and supplies.

At 9:30 a.m., NASA TV will broadcast from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida a briefing to highlight the science and research on board the Dragon.

Following the science briefing, NASA TV will then broadcast beginning at 11:15 a.m. the arrival of the agency’s first asteroid sample return mission as the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is set to rendezvous with asteroid Bennu.

Coverage of the Soyuz docking to the International Space Station will begin on NASA TV’s media channel and the agency’s website beginning at 11:45 a.m. and be broadcast on all channels following the conclusion of OSIRIS-REx coverage expected at 12:15 p.m., with the spacecraft docking expected at 12:36 p.m.

Coverage of the hatch opening between the Soyuz and the space station will begin at 1:45 p.m.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/03/new-crew-blasts-off-heading-to-space-station-today/

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #25 on: 12/03/2018 04:56 pm »
Exp 58 Trio Docks to Station Six Hours After Launch Today

Mark Garcia Posted on December 3, 2018

The Soyuz spacecraft carrying NASA astronaut Anne McClain, David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency, and Oleg Konenenko of the Russian space agency Roscosmos docked to the International Space Station at 12:33 p.m. EST while both spacecraft were flying about 251 miles over the Atlantic Ocean.

Aboard the space station, Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA, and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos will welcome the new crew members when the hatches between the two spacecraft are opened following standard pressurization and leak checks.

Watch the hatch opening targeted for 2:35 p.m. and welcome ceremony to follow live on NASA TV and the agency’s website beginning at 1:45 p.m.

For continued coverage and more information about the mission, visit: https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/. Get space station news, images and features via social media on Instagram at: @iss, ISS on Facebook, and on Twitter @Space_Station and @ISS_Research.\

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/03/exp-58-trio-docks-to-station-six-hours-after-launch-today/

Offline anik

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #26 on: 12/04/2018 11:48 am »
ONLY  three crew for Expedition 58?  When the next crew arrive on Soyuz MS- 12 will that be Expedition 59?

Expedition 58 will begin after Soyuz MS-09 undocking on December 20, Expedition 59 - after Soyuz MS-11 undocking on June 25, Expedition 60 - after Soyuz MS-12 undocking on October 3, Expedition 61 - after Soyuz MS-13 undocking on February 6.

Things change so quickly...

From someone: "To get the Expeditions back in synch, Expedition 58 will end and 59 will begin at the 58S (Soyuz MS-12 - my note) docking for one time only instead of the usual undocking to undocking formula"

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #27 on: 12/12/2018 02:06 pm »

Offline MattBaker

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #28 on: 12/12/2018 08:18 pm »
Weird how the image background is Europe (Southeast England between Oleg and Anne is quite recognisable, the rest I'm having trouble with...) when the crewmembers are American, French Canadian and Russian, any specific reason Expedition 58 is associated with nighttime Western Europe other than "It looks cool"?

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #29 on: 12/20/2018 01:29 am »
ISS configuration after Soyuz MS-09 departure.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #30 on: 12/20/2018 03:04 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 12/19/2018

55 Soyuz (55S) Undock and Landing: The 55S crew, Sergey Prokopev, Alexander Gerst, and Serena Auñón -Chancellor, are scheduled to return to Earth tonight. Undock is scheduled for 7:40 PM CT with landing at 11:03 PM CT. The crew is scheduled to arrive at Ellington on Friday, December 21.

Bone Densitometer Calibration: The crew performed the calibration for the Bone Densitometer using a phantom (calibration) mouse.  Approximately the size of a consumer microwave oven, the Bone Densitometer (BD) uses X-rays to measure the bone mineral density (and the lean and fat tissue) of mice living aboard the ISS. As a result, researchers hope to develop medical technology that will combat bone density loss in space and on Earth, helping millions of senior citizens who suffer from osteoporosis.  Bone Densitometer will be used to support the ongoing Rodent Research-8 investigation.

Functional Immune and Standard Measures (separate investigations): Blood and Saliva samples were collected in support of the Functional Immune and Standard Measures investigations.  The Functional Immune Alterations, Latent Herpesvirus Reactivation, Physiological Stress and Clinical Incidence Onboard the International Space Station (Functional Immune) investigation analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crew members’ immune systems during flight.  The aim of the Standard Measures investigation is to ensure consistent capture of an optimized, minimal set of measures from crewmembers until the end of the ISS Program in order to characterize the adaptive responses to and risks of living in space.

Time Perception: The crew performed the Time Perception experiment using a virtual reality headset and headphones. A laptop program induces visual and audio stimuli to measure a subject’s response to spatial and time perception in a microgravity environment. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #31 on: 12/21/2018 07:34 am »
SEDA-AP grappled by SSRMS, unberthed and jettisoned.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #32 on: 12/21/2018 08:18 am »
SEDA-AP grappled by SSRMS, unberthed and jettisoned.

Could you indicate which video segment in UStream this operation is stored under?
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #33 on: 12/21/2018 10:44 am »
SEDA-AP grappled by SSRMS, unberthed and jettisoned.

Could you indicate which video segment in UStream this operation is stored under?
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/118953577

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #34 on: 12/21/2018 02:18 pm »
https://twitter.com/JAXA_Kiboriyo/status/1076035189325754369
Google Translation
Quote
Good job today! And good-bye
SEDA-AP, which was terminated, left the # ISS today
SEDA-AP was installed at the outboard exposure part from the beginning of operation of "Kibo", and we observed neutrons, heavy ions, etc descending from space. The long-term data greatly contributes to spacecraft design and low earth orbit activities.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #35 on: 12/21/2018 04:08 pm »
International Crew to Ring in Christmas 50 Years After First Moon Trip

Mark Garcia Posted on December 21, 2018

Three people from the U.S., Canada and Russia are orbiting Earth today getting ready to observe Christmas and experience New Year’s Eve from space aboard the International Space Station. Back on Earth, another three station crew members have returned to their home bases just 24 hours after completing a 197-day mission aboard the orbital lab.

The first time three humans spent Christmas in space was 50 years ago in 1968 during Apollo 8 and was also the first time a crew orbited the Moon. This Christmas astronauts Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency with cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos will be soaring about 250 miles above the Earth’s surface in a much larger spacecraft. The Expedition 58 trio will share a traditional meal aboard the orbital lab, share gifts and call down to family during their off-duty day.

Kononenko is beginning his fourth mission on the station and will spend his second Christmas in space. McClain and Saint-Jacques are getting used to life in space for the first time and will return to Earth in June with Kononenko.

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor returned to Houston late Thursday just one day after landing in Kazakhstan wrapping up her six-and-a-half month stay aboard the orbital lab. She parachuted to Earth inside the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft with her Expedition 57 crewmates Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/12/21/international-crew-to-ring-in-christmas-50-years-after-first-moon-trip/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #36 on: 12/24/2018 10:47 pm »
SEDA-AP grappled by SSRMS, unberthed and jettisoned.

Could you indicate which video segment in UStream this operation is stored under?
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/118953577

Is there any way to determine absolute times from these archived streams?  I'm trying to find the jettison
time, ideally to the nearest minute.
-----------------------------

Jonathan McDowell
http://planet4589.org

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #37 on: 12/25/2018 10:06 pm »
The on duty console controllers are passing Christmas greetings to the crew...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #38 on: 12/27/2018 06:55 am »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/25895/
Google Translation
Quote
In accordance with the flight program of the International Space Station (ISS), on December 27, 2018, a planned correction of the ISS orbit was performed.
To accomplish the maneuver, at 06:05 Moscow time, the propulsion system of the Progress MS-10 cargo vehicle attached to the International Space Station was turned on. Engine running time was 337.5 seconds. As a result, the station received a speed increment of 0.65 m / s.In accordance with the data of the ballistic-navigation support of the Mission Control Center, the parameters of the ISS orbit after the execution of the maneuver were:
the minimum height above the Earth’s surface is 404.4 km,
the maximum height above the earth's surface is 422.8 km,
circulation period - 92.62 min.,
orbit inclination - 51.66 degrees.
The purpose of the correction was the formation of ballistic conditions for launching into orbit and docking with the ISS of the Soyuz MS-12 transport manned spacecraft planned for March 2019.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #39 on: 12/27/2018 03:23 pm »
SEDA-AP grappled by SSRMS, unberthed and jettisoned.

Could you indicate which video segment in UStream this operation is stored under?
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/118953577

Is there any way to determine absolute times from these archived streams?  I'm trying to find the jettison
time, ideally to the nearest minute.

It seems the first news about successful jettison broke on Twitter already on Dec. 20 at 22:55 UTC: https://twitter.com/tqdays/status/1075887369914589184

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #40 on: 12/28/2018 09:11 am »
The SPDM is waiting above the JEM-EF.
I suppose, that they are prepairing some work with the exchange of some MISSE sample carriers.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #41 on: 12/28/2018 02:26 pm »
http://www.alphaspace.com/news/alpha-space-launches-its-first-misse-resupply-mission/
Quote
Alpha Space Test and Research Alliance, LLC (Alpha Space) launched its latest set of MISSE carriers to the International Space Station on Nov. 17, 2018 aboard the Northrop Grumman NG-10 resupply mission.
Quote
“This latest launch of carriers marks the company’s first MISSE resupply mission,” stated Mark Gittleman, Alpha Space president and CEO. “Our team integrated and delivered seven MISSE carriers with over 400 unique science and engineering experiments and tests for our customers, which include commercial enterprises, NASA, other government agencies, and educational programs.
Quote
Alpha Space expects its first returned carrier to arrive in Feb. of 2019.
Quote
“Our next two launches are scheduled for May and November 2019”, shared Gittleman.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #42 on: 01/02/2019 06:12 am »
It looks like the operation regarding the MSC exchange has started last night.
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119361543
At around 01:53 the hatch of the JEM-AL was opened, at around 01:59 the slide table was pulled out, then the MTT was picked up by the SPDM. At around 02:49 the MTT was pulled away from the slide table.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #43 on: 01/02/2019 10:34 am »
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119373273
At around 02:52 one Dextre arm started the work on MISSE-FF. I suppose, it will deinstall one (ore more, or all) of the at the moment on MISSE-FF installed MSC´s.
(Can´t provide a picture, because I´m not on my own computer.)

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #44 on: 01/03/2019 10:29 pm »
http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/119373273
At around 02:52 one Dextre arm started the work on MISSE-FF. I suppose, it will deinstall one (ore more, or all) of the at the moment on MISSE-FF installed MSC´s.
(Can´t provide a picture, because I´m not on my own computer.)
Doing R&R on a non MSC module. Will also install several MSCs.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #45 on: 01/04/2019 11:11 am »
Doing R&R on a non MSC module. Will also install several MSCs.
Jester has provided the details on L2.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #46 on: 01/04/2019 09:36 pm »
Dragon Departing Station Next Week; Crew Studies Biology

Mark Garcia Posted on January 4, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is in its final week attached to the International Space Station’s Harmony module. Meanwhile, robotics experts on the ground and the crew aboard the lab are working a wide variety of science activities today.

The Dragon space freighter has nearly completed its cargo mission to replenish the orbital laboratory after delivering over 5,600 pounds of science and supplies Dec. 8. Dragon will return to Earth Jan. 10 for retrieval in the Pacific Ocean loaded with completed science experiments and used hardware for analysis.

New space exposure experiments are being remotely installed outside the station today using a specialized robotic hand known as Dextre. Also, astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques collected biological samples today for stowage and later analysis. The duo then split up for more science work including testing crew brain function and removing science hardware that explores stem cells and other biological processes.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/04/dragon-departing-station-next-week-crew-studies-biology/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #47 on: 01/06/2019 06:53 am »
The USOS crew just had a morning DPC meaning Sunday is a work day, very unusual.  Apparently packing Dragon is the reason...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #48 on: 01/06/2019 12:40 pm »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #49 on: 01/06/2019 12:46 pm »
These are EXP-57 photos  ;)

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #50 on: 01/06/2019 01:23 pm »



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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #51 on: 01/06/2019 01:44 pm »
CSA version:




BRoll Version:


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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #52 on: 01/07/2019 10:00 am »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #53 on: 01/07/2019 11:00 am »
Given this news:
https://ria.ru/20181224/1548548239.html
Google translate:
Quote
“In February of next year, the Canadian manipulator will take a platform with 2.5 tons of batteries, transfer it to a point below the station and send it into free flight. The platform with batteries will become the heaviest garbage ejected from the ISS,” the agency’s source said.
According to him, a similar operation on the ISS was done in July 2007, but then the tank with ammonia weighing 640 kilograms was dropped by the American astronaut Clayton Anderson, standing on the Canadian manipulator.
At the same time, the source stressed that it was decided not to throw the platform away from a good life.
“The platform with the new batteries was delivered to the station by a Japanese cargo ship in September. The replacement of batteries for the ISS was planned for October, but due to the emergency launch of the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, they were postponed to February 2019. The truck, which had to remove the platform with the old batteries, flew away from the station in November, "he said.
In this regard, the source continued, NASA decided to throw away the platform with the old batteries using a manipulator. There are no ecological aspects to history: the garbage will burn up in dense layers of the atmosphere, pollution will not arise, the source said.
It was reported that on December 21, with the help of a Canadian manipulator, the Japanese scientific equipment, weighing about half a ton, was thrown away from the station with the help of a Canadian manipulator.

Before the partial Federal government furlough, was there any further explanation of this operation will be executed?

Also, has there been any thought about the visual magnitude of the discarded platform + batteries, in terms of amateur satellite observation?

I remember that amateur astronomers were able to observe the lost tool-bag in orbit over ten years ago.
Support your local planetarium!

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #54 on: 01/08/2019 01:36 am »
Given this news:
https://ria.ru/20181224/1548548239.html
Google translate:
Quote
“In February of next year, the Canadian manipulator will take a platform with 2.5 tons of batteries, transfer it to a point below the station and send it into free flight. The platform with batteries will become the heaviest garbage ejected from the ISS,” the agency’s source said.
According to him, a similar operation on the ISS was done in July 2007, but then the tank with ammonia weighing 640 kilograms was dropped by the American astronaut Clayton Anderson, standing on the Canadian manipulator.
At the same time, the source stressed that it was decided not to throw the platform away from a good life.
“The platform with the new batteries was delivered to the station by a Japanese cargo ship in September. The replacement of batteries for the ISS was planned for October, but due to the emergency launch of the Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, they were postponed to February 2019. The truck, which had to remove the platform with the old batteries, flew away from the station in November, "he said.
In this regard, the source continued, NASA decided to throw away the platform with the old batteries using a manipulator. There are no ecological aspects to history: the garbage will burn up in dense layers of the atmosphere, pollution will not arise, the source said.
It was reported that on December 21, with the help of a Canadian manipulator, the Japanese scientific equipment, weighing about half a ton, was thrown away from the station with the help of a Canadian manipulator.

Before the partial Federal government furlough, was there any further explanation of this operation will be executed?

Also, has there been any thought about the visual magnitude of the discarded platform + batteries, in terms of amateur satellite observation?

I remember that amateur astronomers were able to observe the lost tool-bag in orbit over ten years ago.
The EVAs to replace the batteries has not occurred yet due to the short handover period and visiting vehicle traffic. Once the EVAs have been performed, then the release of the old batteries will be planned.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #55 on: 01/08/2019 02:24 am »
Dragon Packed With Science Before Thursday’s Departure

Mark Garcia Posted on January 7, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew members are packing the SpaceX Dragon space freighter ahead of its return to Earth on Thursday. Ground controllers are also readying communications gear and robotics systems prior to Dragon’s departure from the International Space Station.

Astronauts Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency are wrapping up final transfers of completed science experiments in Dragon today. The duo is loading science samples from several experiments for return to Earth, where they will quickly be delivered to investigators around the country for analysis.

Engineers on the ground are testing communications and control gear that will be used to monitor and command Dragon after its release from the station. Robotics controllers are also powering up the Canadarm2 robotic arm today to grapple Dragon before its removal from the Harmony module.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/07/dragon-packed-with-science-before-thursdays-departure/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #56 on: 01/08/2019 01:49 pm »
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques opens student exposition Spectrum from space!

Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, January 8, 2019 — On January 10, 2019, live from the International Space Station, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut  David Saint-Jacques will open Spectrum, a science exposition organized by the University of Saskatchewan, and will answer students’ questions.

Former Canadian astronaut Dave Williams, who is from Saskatoon, will be there to take part in the live exchange.

Media representatives are invited to attend. Those who are unable to go in person can watch the event in real time on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

Date:           January 10, 2019

Time:           9:00 a.m. CT

What:          Astronaut David Saint-Jacques opens Spectrum, a science exposition, and answers students’ questions

 
Who:           David Saint-Jacques, Canadian Space Agency astronaut

                 Dave Williams, former Canadian Space Agency astronaut

Where:        University of Saskatchewan

                 Convocation Hall

                 107 Administration Place

                 Saskatoon, Saskatchewan  S7N 5A2

   
For more information about the mission, visit the Canadian Space Agency’s website.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #57 on: 01/08/2019 05:05 pm »
Crews Wraps Up Science Packing After Robotic Arm Grips Dragon

Mark Garcia Posted on January 8, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon space freighter is in the grips of the Canadarm2 robotic arm today as the Expedition 58 crew wraps up cargo transfers inside the vessel. The space trio is also on lab duty conducting a variety of microgravity research aboard the International Space Station.

Overnight, robotics controllers remotely commanded the Canadarm2 to grapple Dragon before its release from the Harmony module. Meanwhile, the hatches are still open and Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques continue loading time-critical space experiments inside the U.S. cargo craft.

The crew will shut the hatch to Dragon Wednesday and disconnect power cables. Then robotics controllers will take over, uninstall Dragon from Harmony overnight and maneuver it into release position. McClain will be in the cupola Thursday monitoring Dragon when it is released from the Canadarm2 around 4:35 a.m. EDT.

After its departure, Dragon will orbit Earth a few more hours before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern California. SpaceX personnel will retrieve Dragon and return it to port where NASA engineers will extract the precious cargo for immediate shipment to investigators around the country.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/08/crews-wraps-up-science-packing-after-robotic-arm-grips-dragon/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #58 on: 01/09/2019 10:06 pm »
Astronauts and Robotics Experts Finalize Dragon Departure Work\

Mark Garcia Posted on January 9, 2019

The three Expedition 58 crew members have finished packing the SpaceX Dragon cargo craft with science experiments and hardware today. Final preparations for the vehicle’s departure are now on hold while teams wait for favorable weather in the splashdown area for Dragon’s return.

Dragon was scheduled for departure early Thursday morning from the International Space Station but mission managers made the decision to delay departure. Managers are assessing the backup release date of Sunday, Jan. 13 for Dragon’s return to Earth.

Robotics controllers maneuvered the Canadarm2 robotic arm Wednesday and grappled Dragon while it was still attached to the Harmony module. Prior to Dragon departure, they will remotely uninstall Dragon from Harmony and slowly guide it to its release position.

Astronaut Anne McClain will be in the cupola when robotics experts command the Canadarm2 to release Dragon finalizing its mission at the orbital lab. She’ll monitor its departure while her crewmates Commander Oleg Kononenko and Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques work on their daily science and maintenance tasks.

Dragon, which arrived at the station Dec. 8, will orbit Earth a few more hours on its own before reentering the atmosphere. It will parachute to a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of southern California where SpaceX personnel will retrieve the space freighter. They’ll deliver it to shore where NASA engineers will extract the precious cargo for immediate shipment to investigators around the country for analysis.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/09/astronauts-and-robotics-experts-finalize-dragon-departure-work/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #59 on: 01/10/2019 08:20 am »
The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor – ASIM – is performing well outside the European Columbus laboratory module on the International Space Station.

Launched in April 2018, the space storm-hunter is a collection of optical cameras, photometers and an X- and gamma-ray detector designed to look for electrical discharges born in stormy weather conditions that extend above thunderstorms into the upper atmosphere.

These ‘transient luminous events’ sport names such as red sprites, blue jets and elves.

Satellites have probed them and observations have even been made from mountain tops but because they occur above thunderstorms they are difficult to study in greater detail from Earth.

In contrast, the International Space Station’s low orbit covers a large part of Earth along the equator and is ideally placed to capture the sprites and jets.

ESA astronaut Andreas Mogensen managed to catch the elves and sprites in action during his 2015 mission on board the International Space Station.

Now months into its commissioning, ASIM is performing well. Using data continuously collected by ASIM, researchers are investigating the relationship between terrestrial gamma-ray bursts, lightning and high-altitude electric discharges across all seasons.

Aside from being a little-understood phenomenon and part of our world, these powerful electrical charges can reach high above the stratosphere and have implications for how our atmosphere protects us from radiation from space.

ASIM is keeping researchers busy. Data collected so far have prompted eight presentations so far at the December meeting of the American Geophysical Union, the largest international gathering of Earth and space scientists.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 01/10/2019 03:09 pm »
Dragon’s Return to Earth Delayed Till Sunday

Mark Garcia Posted on January 10, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft had its stay extended at the International Space Station a few more days. Mission managers observed inclement weather at Dragon’s splashdown site in the Pacific Ocean and decided against Dragon’s return to Earth today.

Meanwhile, Dragon’s hatch remains open and the Expedition 58 crew is tending to time-sensitive experiments targeted for return and analysis back on Earth. The Canadarm2 robotic arm has the Dragon firmly in its grips while the cargo vehicle is still attached to the Harmony module.

Robotics controllers will command the Canadarm2 to uninstall Dragon from Harmony on Saturday afternoon then slowly maneuver the U.S. space freighter to its release position. The Canadarm2 will then be commanded to release Dragon Sunday at 3:36 a.m. EDT as astronaut Anne McClain monitors from the cupola. NASA TV will broadcast the departure live without commentary starting Sunday at 3:15 a.m.

Today, the three space station residents are back on science and maintenance duties with Dragon poised for a weekend departure. McClain of NASA is checking out and preserving the space research meant for return inside Dragon.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency assisted McClain first thing Thursday morning. He then moved on to the Vascular Echo study scanning his leg’s femoral artery with an ultrasound device to understand how living in space affects the cardiovascular system.

Cosmonaut Oleg Kononenko explored ways to improve piloting techniques in space and participated in a psychological assessment. The four-time station resident also maintained Russian life support systems aboard the orbital lab.

Back on Earth, NASA and SpaceX are continuing to work on the activities leading toward the Demo-1, uncrewed flight test to the International Space Station. NASA and SpaceX are now targeting no earlier than February for the launch of Demo-1 to complete hardware testing and joint reviews. NASA and SpaceX will confirm a new target date after coordination with the Eastern Range and the International Space Station Program.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/10/dragons-return-to-earth-delayed-till-sunday/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 01/10/2019 05:40 pm »
Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques talks with Saskatchewan students from orbit

January 10, 2019 – Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

The University of Saskatchewan’s student-run event Spectrum 2019 opened this morning with a special appearance from Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques – from space! More than 300 participants, including 200 grade 6–9 students from schools across Saskatchewan, had the unique opportunity to interact with Saint-Jacques, who is living and working aboard the International Space Station until June 2019.

Veteran Canadian astronaut and Saskatoon native Dr. Dave Williams was also present for the event. He talked about his own space flight experience and the incredible power of space to inspire and engage the next generation of explorers. Participants listened attentively as Williams and Saint-Jacques exchanged stories about living in orbit. A group of high school students then had a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to ask questions to astronaut David Saint-Jacques in space.

Quick facts


·         Spectrum is a triennial student-run event that inspires, educates, and promotes exploration in science, technology, and engineering. From January 10 to 13, Spectrum 2019 will feature displays, interactive exhibits, workshops, competitions, and speakers that explain and showcase scientific concepts and technological innovations.

·          To engage young Canadians in science and related disciplines, the CSA is coordinating and collaborating with partners to deliver a wide variety of activities and contests during David’s mission. Here are some examples:

o    Contest – Bring space to your school: Canadian schools are invited to enter a contest to host an event with CSA astronaut David Saint-Jacques while he is in space! Deadline for submissions is February 28, 2019.

o    Radi-N2 and You: While David measures radiation levels aboard the ISS as part of the Radi-N2 experiment, classrooms across Canada can do the same on Earth. 

o    Astro Pi challenge: Develop your own code, and it may run on the Space Station! Two different complexity levels make Astro Pi accessible to students with or without coding experience.

Quotes

“Several years ago, driven by curiosity and a passion for science and technology, I studied engineering to understand how things worked. I now have the humbling privilege to live this extraordinary adventure. It is the most incredible opportunity to keep learning and to gain a new and rare perspective on our planet, our universe and humanity.”

David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

“It’s a very special day for me to see a fellow Canadian, David Saint-Jacques, in space, as I was there more than 10 years ago. As a Saskatoon native, I am pleased to see so many local students raising their eyes to space and seeing how science can open doors to new horizons!”

Dave Williams, former CSA astronaut

“The Spectrum team is very excited to kick off our event with a live stream with David! This is an incredible opportunity for us to partner with the CSA in our shared mission of promoting education and exploration in science and engineering!” 

Gillian Leach, Cameco Spectrum 2019 Coordinator and civil engineering student at University of Saskatchewan

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 01/11/2019 04:35 am »
Video of St-Jacques' Q&A with Saskatchewan school kids.


« Last Edit: 01/11/2019 04:36 am by Lewis007 »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 01/11/2019 05:49 pm »
Station, SpaceX Managers Set Dragon Release For Sunday Afternoon

Mark Garcia Posted on January 11, 2019

To take advantage of calmer sea states in a different location in the Pacific Ocean, SpaceX and the International Space Station Program agreed to move the departure of the SpaceX-CRS-16 Dragon cargo craft from the station from early Sunday morning to late Sunday afternoon, setting up the first night splashdown and recovery of a Dragon vehicle.

Dragon’s hatch will be closed Sunday morning, and the spacecraft will be detached from the Harmony module around 3 p.m. EST Sunday.

Ground controllers will now release Dragon from the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 6:30 p.m. Sunday. NASA TV coverage of the operation without commentary will begin at 6:15 p.m. NASA Flight Engineer Anne McClain will monitor the release from the station’s cupola.

Dragon’s deorbit burn to begin its descent back to Earth is now scheduled at approximately 11:19 p.m. with splashdown scheduled at around 12:10 a.m. Monday (9:10 p.m. Pacific time) just west of Baja California.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/11/station-spacex-managers-set-dragon-release-for-sunday-afternoon/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 01/12/2019 07:07 am »
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 11, 2019

Governor General and Prime Minister to Hold Videoconference with
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques

OTTAWA—Her Excellency the Right Honourable Julie Payette, Governor General of Canada, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will host a videoconference with Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques on Monday, January 14, 2019, at 10 a.m. from Rideau Hall.

A group of students will also participate in the videoconference and have the opportunity to ask the astronaut questions about his experience in space.

David Saint-Jacques flew to the International Space Station (ISS) on December 3, 2018—his first mission to space. During his time aboard the ISS, which is set to be the longest stay for a Canadian, he will carry out scientific experiments, perform robotics tasks and test new technologies.  For more information about the mission, visit www. asc-csa.gc.ca/eng/missions/expedition58/default.asp.

This event will be pooled for media. For more information, please contact the Parliamentary Press Gallery at 613-992-6517. Media covering the event must arrive at the Princess Anne Entrance no later than 9:30 a.m. on the day of the ceremony.


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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 01/13/2019 11:15 pm »
ISS configuration after Dragon-16 departure.
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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #68 on: 01/13/2019 11:37 pm »
Dragon Released to Return Science and Supplies Back to Earth

Mark Garcia Posted on January 13, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft was released from the International Space Station today at 6:33 p.m. EST. Robotics controllers remotely commanded the Canadarm2 robotic arm to let go of the U.S. space freighter sending it on a solo trajectory back to Earth.

Astronaut Anne McClain monitored the activities from the cupola and watched Dragon perform a series of departure burns as it separated itself to a safe distance from the orbital lab. Integrated operations between mission controllers in Houston and SpaceX controllers in California stop when Dragon reaches a point about one kilometer away from the station.

SpaceX personnel will retrieve Dragon after it parachutes to a splashdown in the Pacific Ocean Monday at 12:15 a.m. (9:15 p.m. Sunday Pacific time) then tow it to port in southern California. This will be the first nighttime splashdown and recovery for the Dragon with plenty of moonlight to track its entry.

The commercial cargo vessel is taking home a variety of critical space research that will immediately be picked up by NASA engineers and distributed to scientists across the nation. Station hardware will also be extracted for analysis, refurbishment or discarding.

Dragon completes a 36-day mission attached to the station’s Harmony module after delivering more than 5,600 pounds of science and supplies on Dec. 8. Today’s departure leaves four spacecraft, including Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus cargo craft, attached to the space station.

The next Dragon mission to the space station will be its first uncrewed demonstration mission designated SpaceX DM-1. The Commercial Crew Program’s first launch is currently targeted for February and will demonstrate ground systems, orbit to docking activities and landing operations.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/13/dragon-released-to-return-science-and-supplies-back-to-earth/
« Last Edit: 01/13/2019 11:50 pm by SMS »
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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #69 on: 01/14/2019 03:56 pm »
Dragon Back on Earth as Crew Revs Up Station Science

Mark Garcia Posted on January 14, 2019

The SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is back on Earth after splashing down in the Pacific Ocean Sunday night loaded with critical space research and International Space Station hardware. Four spaceships remain parked at the orbital lab including Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus resupply ship from the United States.

Today, the three-member Expedition 58 crew is exploring a wide array of microgravity science to improve life for humans on Earth and in space. The orbital residents also worked on life support systems and upgraded computer hardware.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain set up a specialized microscope in the morning for the Biophysics-5 study to research the production of protein crystals. Afterward, she deactivated Dragon communications gear then swapped out hard drives on several laptop computers.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack and replaced optics gear inside the flame and soot research device. He later swapped a hydrogen sensor inside the Oxygen Generation System before inspecting and cleaning some of its parts.

A pair of tiny internal satellites, better known as SPHERES, were set up by Commander Oleg Kononenko today inside the Kibo laboratory module. High school students write algorithms and submit them in a competition to control the SPHERES to demonstrate spacecraft maneuvers and formation-flying for future space missions.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/14/dragon-back-on-earth-as-crew-revs-up-station-science/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #70 on: 01/15/2019 10:25 pm »
Station Trio Practices Emergency Before Radiation, Physics Research

Mark Garcia Posted on January 15, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew members started Tuesday with an emergency drill before splitting up for more space research and hardware maintenance.

Commander Oleg Kononenko led Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques through a simulated emergency this morning aboard the International Space Station. The trio practiced communication and coordination with Mission Control Centers in Houston and Moscow.

The unlikely emergency scenarios the crew trains for include events such as depressurization, ammonia leaks and fires. Responses include quickly donning safety gear, closing a module hatch to isolate pressure and ammonia leaks, extinguishing a fire and evacuating the station aboard the Soyuz crew ship.

McClain then moved on to cable and parts work on the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) that can house a variety of smaller experiments. She wrapped up the day photographing Saint-Jacques as he installed neutron detectors for an experiment to understand how space radiation impacts astronauts.

Kononenko worked today on the Electromagnetic Levitator that exposes materials to extremely high temperatures to explore their thermo-physical properties in the microgravity environment. The four-time station cosmonaut later went on to routine maintenance on life support systems in the orbital lab’s Russian segment.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/15/station-trio-practices-emergency-before-radiation-physics-research/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #71 on: 01/16/2019 05:06 pm »
Astronauts Study Head and Eye Pressure, Wearable Body Monitor

Mark Garcia Posted on January 16, 2019

Human research took precedence aboard the International Space Station today as the Expedition 58 crew explored how astronauts adapt to living in space. The orbital residents also performed more ordinary roles as computer technicians and plumbers.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain is studying today the fluid shifts from an astronaut’s lower body to the upper body and how they pressure the head and eyes during a spaceflight. She collected her blood samples for the long-running experiment, spinning them in a centrifuge before stowing the samples in a science freezer.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques measured his blood pressure beginning operations with the new Bio-Monitor system from the Canadian Space Agency. The wearable device monitors an astronaut’s physiological data in real-time with minimum interference to crew activities.

McClain also had time to relocate and deploy a laptop computer from the Harmony module to the Columbus lab module. Saint-Jacques spent the rest of Wednesday afternoon replacing parts in the space station’s toilet located in the Tranquility module.

Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on Russian maintenance in the orbital lab before inspecting and photographing windows in the Russian modules. He wrapped up the day on a pair of ongoing Earth observation studies photographing natural and man-made phenomena.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/16/astronauts-study-head-and-eye-pressure-wearable-body-monitor/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #72 on: 01/17/2019 06:55 pm »
Crew Studies Space-Caused Eye Pressure and Cultural Differences

Mark Garcia Posted on January 17, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew focused again today on studying head and eye pressure changes astronauts experience while living in space. The crew then went on to more science hardware and life support maintenance aboard the International Space Station.

Flight Engineers Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques worked throughout Thursday morning researching the upward flow of fluids that occurs inside astronauts’ bodies. The duo conducted eye scans with a variety of devices to measure eye pressure changes caused by these fluid shifts in microgravity.

McClain then spent the afternoon connecting cables and installing parts on the Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) that houses small experiments in the Kibo lab module. Saint-Jacques replaced electronics gear in the Kubik incubator that enables research on seeds, cells and small animals in the Columbus lab module.

Commander Oleg Kononenko ensured the upkeep of life support gear and other station systems in the Russian segment of the orbital lab. The veteran cosmonaut of three previous Expeditions ended the day exploring how station crew members from around the world interact and learn to live together in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/17/crew-studies-space-caused-eye-pressure-and-cultural-differences/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #73 on: 01/18/2019 01:55 pm »
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques to explore Earth from space

Ottawa, Ontario, January 18, 2019 — During a live appearance from space, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will launch an interactive Web-based activity using pictures taken from space.

Dr. Roberta Bondar, the first Canadian woman in space and Jenni Sidey-Gibbons, CSA astronaut, will have a discussion with David Saint-Jacques during the event.

Media representatives who are unable to attend can watch the event live on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

Date:           January 22, 2019

Time:           11:20 a.m. ET

What:          Launch of interactive Web-based activity Exploring Earth

Who:           Dr. Roberta Bondar, former CSA astronaut

                 David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

Jenni Sidey-Gibbons, CSA astronaut

                 About 200 students in grades 5 and 6

Where:        Canada Science and Technology Museum

                 Auditorium

                 1867 St Laurent Boulevard

                 Ottawa, Ontario K1G 5A3

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #74 on: 01/18/2019 05:48 pm »
Tech Work and Life Science Ahead of Orbital Boost Today

Mark Garcia Posted on January 18, 2019

Satellite and combustion technology are being worked on today aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 crew also studied botany and psychology while the station raised its orbit in a planned reboost maneuver.

Anne McClain of NASA installed new SlingShot small satellite deployer gear inside the Cygnus space freighter. SlingShot will deploy small research satellites from Cygnus after it departs the space station’s Unity module in February and reaches a safe distance.

McClain also transferred biomedical hardware for the Fluid Shifts head and eye pressure study into the Zvezda service module for continuing research. She later worked in the Columbus lab module installing a light meter to measure the amount of light nourishing plants inside the Veggie botany facility.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack and configured hardware inside the flame and soot research device. The work is being done ahead of operations for the Advanced Combustion in Microgravity Experiments that encompass a set of five independent gaseous flames studies.

He later typed his mood, thoughts and emotions into an electronic journal for the Behavioral Core Measures experiment. The psychological study seeks to understand how the spacecraft environment, long-term separation from family and friends, loss of day-night cycle and other factors impact crew behavior.

In the Russian segment of the station, Commander Oleg Kononenko transferred fluids and packed trash into the docked Progress 70 (70P) cargo craft. The Progress resupply ship is due to undock from the Pirs docking compartment on Jan. 25.

A second docked Progress cargo craft, the 71P, fired its engines shortly after 1:01 p.m. EST to raise the station’s orbit.  The reboost comes in advance of upcoming cargo missions and the next crew launch in February.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/18/tech-work-and-life-science-ahead-of-orbital-boost-today/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #75 on: 01/18/2019 06:01 pm »
https://www.roscosmos.ru/25943/
Google translation
Quote
The planned correction of the orbit of the ISS
In accordance with the flight program of the International Space Station (ISS), on January 18, 2019, a planned correction of the ISS orbit was performed. To conduct a maneuver at 21 hours 01 min. Moscow time, the propulsion system of the Progress MS-10 transport cargo ship docked to the ISS was switched on.The time of the propulsion system was 500 seconds. As a result, the station received a speed increment of 1 m / s.
According to the data of the ballistic-navigation support service, the Mission Control Center (MCC), the calculated parameters of the ISS orbit after the execution of the maneuver were:
- the minimum height above the Earth’s surface is 407.4 km,
- the maximum height above the Earth's surface is 422.2 km,
- period of circulation - 92.62 minutes,
- inclination of the orbit - 51.66 degrees.
The purpose of the correction was the formation of ballistic conditions for the flight of Russian transport ships.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #76 on: 01/19/2019 08:18 pm »
The station experienced a POR (power on reset?) of power channel 3B overnight.  I woke up this morning and heard CAPCOM briefing the status of systems restoration progress to the crew.  Several other issues have been mentioned and addressed through the day with the latest being the crew unable to access the WiFi system on board...
Best quote heard during an inspection, "I was unaware that I was the only one who was aware."

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #77 on: 01/22/2019 06:21 pm »
The SSRMS has done some work in the last hours. Anyone knows what they are doing?

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #78 on: 01/23/2019 03:02 pm »
The SSRMS is working today again.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #79 on: 01/23/2019 03:30 pm »
First amateur radio contact between David Saint-Jacques and Ottawa students

Ottawa, Ontario, January 23, 2019 — As part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will connect with Ottawa students and answer their questions on January 23, live from the International Space Station (ISS).

ARISS is an international working group, aimed at inspiring students worldwide to pursue interests and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through amateur radio communications opportunities with the ISS crew. During David Saint-Jacques’ mission, Radio Amateurs of Canada hopes to establish as many as 20 contacts between the astronaut and youth, both in Canada and around the world.

Media are invited to witness this exchange in person. Those unable to attend can listen to the discussions with David Saint-Jacques, starting at 2:45 p.m., live on this streamer.

 
Date:           January 23, 2019

Time:           2:00 p.m. ET – beginning of the event

                     2:45 p.m. ET – beginning of the connection with David Saint-Jacques

What:          Amateur radio contact between Earth and space

Who:           David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

                 More than 180 elementary students from Grades 4 to 8

Where:        Ashbury College Junior School

                 362 Mariposa Avenue

                 Ottawa, ON K1M 0T3


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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #81 on: 01/25/2019 07:01 pm »
Russian Cargo Ship Undocks; U.S. Cygnus Leaves in February

Mark Garcia Posted on January 25, 2019

A Russian Progress 70 (70P) cargo craft undocked from the International Space Station today at 7:55 a.m. EST loaded with trash and discarded gear. It will orbit Earth a few more hours before reentering the Earth’s atmosphere over the Pacific Ocean for a fiery but safe destruction.

The Progress delivered three tons of food, fuel and supplies to the station crew members on July 9. It was the first two-orbit rendezvous in International Space Station history.

Today’s departure leaves three spaceships attached to the orbital lab including Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter and Russia’s Progress 71 resupply ship and Soyuz MS-11 crew ship. Cygnus is due to complete its mission when it departs from the station’s Unity module on Feb. 8.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/25/russian-cargo-ship-undocks-u-s-cygnus-leaves-in-february/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #82 on: 01/25/2019 07:02 pm »
Cargo Ship Takes out Trash; Crew Works on Cygnus Preps and Science Hardware

Mark Garcia Posted on January 25, 2019

A Russian cargo ship left the International Space Station this morning and was deorbited for a destructive demise over the Pacific Ocean. The Expedition 58 crew now turns its attention to the departure of a U.S. space freighter next month.

The Progress 70 (70P) resupply ship ended its six-and-a-half month stay at the station when it undocked from Pirs docking compartment today at 7:55 a.m. EST. It descended into Earth’s atmosphere less than four hours later loaded with trash and discarded gear and burned up safely over the southern Pacific.

Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus commercial cargo vessel is next up, scheduled to depart the Unity module in early February. Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques have been reviewing Cygnus departure procedures and carefully packing the spaceship throughout the week.

McClain and Saint-Jacques spent Friday working on a variety of science hardware and life support gear aboard the orbital lab. The duo first set up gear to measure airflow inside Japan’s Kibo laboratory module. Next, they serviced a pair of science freezers nicknamed MELFI and GLACIER that store research samples at ultra-cold temperatures.

NASA’s McClain also replaced hardware in the Actiwatch Spectrum, a wearable device that analyzes an astronaut’s sleep quality, sleep onset, hyperactivity and other daily routines. Saint-Jacques from the Canadian Space Agency activated a new 3D printer known as the Refabricator that uses recycled plastics.

Commander Oleg Kononenko from Roscosmos monitored this morning’s 70P undocking and photographed the departing spacecraft. The station veteran also checked on Russian laptop computers and participated in a study that explores how cosmonauts adapt to complex space tasks.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/25/cargo-ship-takes-out-trash-crew-works-on-cygnus-preps-and-science-hardware/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #83 on: 01/28/2019 05:40 pm »
Crew Tests Time Perception in Space and Real-Time Vital Signs Monitoring

Mark Garcia  Posted on January 28, 2019

The Expedition 58 astronauts explored time perception and tested a wearable body monitor aboard the International Space Station today. The orbital residents also packed a U.S. space freighter and set up tiny satellites controlled by students on Earth.

Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques started Monday in the Columbus lab module learning how microgravity affects time perception. During the experiment the crew judges time length with results compared to ground tests. Scientists hypothesize that astronauts experience time passing at a faster rate than those of us here on Earth.

McClain then spent the rest of the day with Commander Oleg Kononenko setting up and monitoring SPHERES satellites in the Kibo lab module. High school students compete to design the best algorithms that control the basketball-sized satellites to mimic spacecraft maneuvers and formation flying.

Saint-Jacques set up a wearable device called the Bio-Monitor to test its ability to measure vital signs with minimum interference during a normal day in space. The Canadian astronaut also continued packing the Cygnus cargo craft from Northrop Grumman ahead of its Feb. 8 departure from the Unity module.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/28/crew-tests-time-perception-in-space-and-real-time-vital-signs-monitoring/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #85 on: 01/29/2019 05:59 am »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/21/2019
 


FIR/LMM/Biophysics-5 Configuration: While the crew was installing Biophysics-5 plate number 3 into the FIR/LMM (Fluids Integrated Rack/Light Microscopy Module), they noted some condensate on the plate and its capillaries.  When they attempted to blot the condensate with a lint-free cloth, one of the capillaries was broken and the plate was bagged for safety reasons.  The team has additional plates in cold stowage and is assessing a forward plan.  LMM/Biophyscs-5, more correctly known as Solution Convection and the Nucleation Precursors in Protein Crystallization, tests whether solution convection – the movement of molecules through the fluid – enhances or suppresses formation of the dense liquid clusters from which crystals form.  This should help to determine why protein crystallization investigations in microgravity often generate unexpectedly low or high numbers of crystals.

Fluid Shifts:  Today when the crew performed a Fluid Shifts Chibis imaging session, some video issues were reported with the ultrasound system. Ground teams are looking into possible causes and resolution for the video issues, but have reported a partial science loss as a result. Fluid Shifts is a NASA investigation, divided into Dilution Measurements, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging with Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure). The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and prevention of eye damage.

The ISS Experience:  The crew participated in the crew conference and the ground uplinked the file needed for the firmware update.  Although the ISS Experience computer application and camera both powered up and responded nominally, the firmware file could not be loaded onto the camera.  The teams are discussing it, but believe the firmware file may have been corrupted during uplink. ISS Experience creates a virtual reality film documenting daily life aboard the space station. The 8 to 10 minute videos created from footage taken during the six-month investigation cover different aspects of crew life, execution of science aboard the station, and the international partnerships involved.  The ISS Experience uses a Z-CAM V1 Pro Cinematic VR (Virtual Reality) 360-degree camera with nine 190° fisheye lenses.

Multipurpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) Checkout: Following the bonding strap installation Tuesday of last week, the crew and ground initiated a checkout of the MSPR DC/DC Converter Unit 2 (DCU2) and Video compression and Recording Unit 2 (VRU2). The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. The MSPR has two workspaces and a work table that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

Direct Current Switching Unit (DCSU) 3B Power On Reset: Friday evening, DCSU 3B experienced a power on reset. All loads downstream of Channel 3B Direct Current-to-Direct Current Converter Units (DDCU) Z13B and S03B were subsequently unpowered. Significant loads lost during this event included Control Moment Gyro (CMG)-3, American to Russian Converter Unit (ARCU)-51, half of the Node1 lights, Node1 and Pressurized Mating Adapter (PMA)-1 B String Heaters, half of the Node 1 Intra-Module Valve (IMV) fans, and a Node 1 smoke detector. Ground teams successfully executed recovery procedures in order to safe critical systems then reactivated hardware that was unpowered during the event. A similar DCSU 3B power on reset was previously experienced in 2012.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #86 on: 01/29/2019 05:59 am »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/22/2019
 


Fluid Shifts: In support of the final day of Fluid Shifts operations, the crew performed a Chibis (lower body negative pressure) Imaging session. The video issues experienced yesterday did not occur today and the ground teams report today’s session occurred nominally. Fluid Shifts is a NASA investigation, divided into Dilution Measurements, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging with Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure). The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes. Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and prevention of eye damage.

Rad-N2 retrieval: The crew retrieved all 8 detectors and pouches from their Node 3 F3 rack deployed location and delivered them to the Russian crew member to processed in the Bubble Reader. The objective of this Canadian Space Agencyinvestigation is to better characterize the ISS neutron environment, define the risk posed to the crew members’ health, and provide the data necessary to develop advanced protective measures for future spaceflight. It’s been recognized that neutrons make up a significant fraction (10-30%) of the biologically effective radiation exposure in low-Earth orbit. The bubble detectors used in the investigation are designed detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMUs) 3004 and 3006 Maintenance: As part routine maintenance, the crew performed an EMU 3004 water loop scrub and acquired water samples for conductivity testing. EMU 3006 was unable to be activated and scrubbed as a result of an anomaly with its fan. Several attempt were made to activate the fan without success. Ground teams are reviewing a forward troubleshooting plan. EMU Loop Scrubs are required preventive maintenance needed to remove any chemical and biological contaminants from the EMU Transport Loop.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued to perform Cygnus cargo operations today. Ground teams estimate ~23 hours of cargo operations remain prior to Cygnus departure planned for February 12.   

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #87 on: 01/29/2019 06:00 am »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/23/2019
 


Materials ISS Experiment Flight Facility (MISSE-FF) Troubleshooting: Performed as planned ground-commanded troubleshooting, today a file downlink attempt was made on the MISSE Science Carrier-11 (MSC-11). This was not successful and the engineering team will assess the errors reported during the attempt. Also as part of the troubleshooting, MSC-9 was powered-up and its power profile monitored for a period of 4 hours. Data gathered from these activities will be discussed and applied to further troubleshooting efforts. The primary MISSE-FF platform provides the ability to test materials, coatings, and components or other larger experiments in the harsh environment of space. Testing in low-Earth orbit (LEO) allows the integrated testing of how materials react to exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UV), atomic oxygen (AO), ionizing radiation, ultrahigh vacuum (UHV), charged particles, thermal cycles, electromagnetic radiation, and micro-meteoroids in the LEO environment.

Fluid Physics Experiment Facility (FPEF) Cable Connect: Today the crew disconnected the Solution Crystallization Observation Facility (SCOF) Payload Bus Cable from the Ryutai Rack Utility Interface Panel (UIP) and Image Processing Unit (IPU) User Video Cables from the IPU.  They then connected the FPEF Payload Bus Cable to UIP and IPU User Video Cables to the IPU and took photos of the final configuration. These activities were performed in support of the SCOF checkout. The SCOF is a JAXA subrack facility, located in the Ryutai (fluid) Rack which investigates the morphology and growth of crystals.

Rodent Research (RR) Life Science Glovebox (LSG) Cleanup: The crew performed RR cleanup activities. This included activities such as cleaning and the removal of the sharps container, bungees, and rear wall cover, as well as the reconfiguration of the LSG filters and stowage of items. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its larger size design, two crew members can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM): Today the crew ingressed BEAM and stowed infrequently used hardware inside, then re-installed the hatch. The BEAM stowage activities will continue tomorrow in order to transfer additional items from Pressure Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 over to BEAM then collect surface and air samples for microbial analysis. BEAM is an experimental expandable module attached to the ISS since April of 2016. Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working. Crews traveling to the moon, Mars, asteroids, or other destinations may be able to use them as habitable structures.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued to perform Cygnus cargo operations today. Ground teams estimate ~22 hours of cargo operations remain prior to Cygnus departure planned for February 12.

Medical Contingency Onboard Training: All Three crewmembers reviewed medical emergency procedures and rescuer roles during a medical event requiring Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). In addition, they reviewed emergency medical hardware configuration and determined desired deployed locations.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Node2 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto the Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF4. They then, maneuvered the SSRMS as required to perform a periodic video and imagery survey of the Latching End Effector B (LEE-B) snare cables using the S1 Lower Outboard External High Definition Camera (EHDC).  Once the survey was completed, SSRMS was maneuvered to park position.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #88 on: 01/29/2019 06:00 am »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/24/2019
 


FIR/LMM/Biophysics-5-2 Plate Installation: The crew installed Biophysics Plate s/n 2002 onto the PACE (Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment) LED Base inside the FIR/LMM (Fluids Integrated Rack/Light Microscopy Module) AFC (Auxiliary Fluids Container) and dispensed oil on the plate.  LMM/Biophyscs-5-2 looks at the relationship between solution convection – the movement of molecules through the fluid – and dense liquid clusters from which protein crystals can form.  The main objective of the investigation is to understand why protein crystallization experiments in microgravity have often generated unexpectedly low or high numbers of crystals. Both of these outcomes may negatively affect experiments designed to obtain a small number of well-separated crystals for x-ray structure studies.

Refabricator Payload Overview: The crew performed a review of the “Big Picture Words” message and crew procedure for the Refabricator hardware installation. The Refabricator’s objective is to demonstrate a unique process for repeatable, closed-loop recycling of a polyetherimide/polycarbonate plastic material for additive manufacturing in the microgravity environment of the ISS. Eventually, Refabricator type hardware could recycle waste plastic materials into high quality 3D-printer filament, providing the potential for sustainable fabrication, repair, and recycling capabilities on long-duration space missions. This hardware represents a key component of NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) technology development roadmap.

Bigelow Expandable Activity Module (BEAM): The BEAM stowage activities continued today in order to transfer items from Pressure Mating Adapter (PMA)-2 over to BEAM then collect surface and air samples for microbial analysis. Once complete, the crew closed the Node2 Forward hatch, reinstalled the BEAM hatch, and closed the Node 3 Aft Hatch. BEAM is an experimental expandable module, which has been attached to the ISS since April of 2016. Expandable modules weigh less and take up less room on a rocket than a traditional module, while providing additional space on-orbit for living and working.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued to perform Cygnus cargo operations today. Ground teams estimate ~23 hours of cargo operations remain prior to Cygnus departure currently planned for February 12.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, the Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) off the Mobile Base System (MBS) PDGF4 Power Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) onto the MBS PDGF1. They then maneuvered the SSRMS as required to perform a video survey of the Latching End Effector A (LEE-A) snare cables.  Once the survey was complete, SSRMS was maneuvered to walk off onto MBS PDGF4 and then on Node2 PDGF.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #89 on: 01/29/2019 06:01 am »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/25/2019
 


ISS Experience setup and recording: The crew set up the hardware in Node 1, recorded themselves with The ISS Experience Z- Cam answering questions from the ISS Experience Astronaut Log, then moved the ISS Experience hardware to Node 2. Questions were related to the astronaut’s personal experience, adaptation to life in space, and space exploration. The ISS Experience team will create a virtual reality film documenting daily life aboard the ISS. The 8 to 10 minute videos created from footage taken during the six-month investigation cover different aspects of crew life, execution of science aboard the station, and the international partnerships involved. The ISS Experience uses a Z-CAM V1 Pro Cinematic VR (Virtual Reality) 360-degree camera with nine 190° fisheye lenses.

Refabricator payload overview: The crew installed the Refabricator hardware into the Basic EXPRESS rack 10B. Refabricator’s objective is to demonstrate a unique process for repeatable, closed-loop recycling of a polyetherimide/polycarbonate plastic material for additive manufacturing in the microgravity environment of the ISS. Eventually, Refabricator type hardware could recycle waste plastic materials into high quality 3D-printer filament, providing the potential for sustainable fabrication, repair, and recycling capabilities on long-duration space missions. This hardware represents a key component of NASA’s In-Space Manufacturing (ISM) technology development roadmap.

70 Progress (70P) Undock: 70P undocked from the Docking Compartment (DC) 1 port today at 5:55 AM CT. The deorbit burn occurred at 10:08 AM CT followed by atmospheric entry and destruction.

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Operations: Yesterday, the crew installed an ITCS Maintenance canister which ran in the Lab ITCS for a minimum of 4 hours to introduce antimicrobial Ortho-Phythaladehyde (OPA). Today, following an equalization of at least 24 hours, the crew removed the canister and took fluid samples.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued Cygnus cargo operations today. Cargo operations will continue to prepare for Cygnus departure currently planned for February 12.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #90 on: 01/29/2019 03:05 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/28/2019

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): Over the weekend, a crewmember installed ELF cartridge unit 001. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility thermophysical property of high temperature, melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Bio-Monitor: Today a crewmember donned the Bio-Monitor primary hardware as part of a 48hr data gathering run. Although the ISS is equipped with health and life sciences research tools, the existing instrumentation for continuous and simultaneous recording of several physiological parameters is lacking. To tackle this issue, the Bio-Monitor Commissioning activity tests the Bio-Monitor facility; a wearable garment capable of monitoring relevant physiological parameters for up to 48 hours in a non-invasive and non-interfering way.

Time Perception in Microgravity: Today crewmembers performed Time Perception sessions. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites-Zero-Robotics (SPHERES-Zero-Robotics): Today crewmembers performed The Zero Robotics 2018 High School Final competition runs. Seventeen teams participated in the runs involving a total of 51 schools from multiple participating countries. The SPHERES-Zero-Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the International Space Station (ISS). As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued Cygnus cargo operations in preparation for the vehicle departure, currently planned for February 8.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #91 on: 01/29/2019 06:50 pm »
Station Crew Helping Future Orion Explorers

Mark Garcia Posted on January 29, 2019

The International Space Station is providing a research platform today to help future astronauts navigate deep space in the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle. The Expedition 58 crew is also testing new lights and setting up the orbital lab for CubeSat deployments.

NASA is planning deep space missions with its new Orion spacecraft that will rely on NASA’s Deep Space Network for communications and navigation. Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques took photographs of the moon from the cupola today to calibrate Orion’s navigation software. The lunar data will provide additional navigation capability for Orion in the event of a loss of communication with the Deep Space Network.

Another experiment geared towards future exploration taking place aboard the station is the Sextant study. As its name suggests, astronauts are testing a hand-held sextant to focus on stability and star-sighting opportunities while in microgravity. Results may aid future Orion explorers and provide a backup navigation source for missions far beyond Earth orbit.

Astronaut Anne McClain worked throughout the day inside Japan’s Kibo laboratory module. She is setting up the Kibo airlock with hardware to deploy a set of CubeSats on Thursday. The CubeSats have a variety of educational and technical mission objectives including studying the ionosphere and satellite communications.

McClain later tested and photographed new lights that scientists are researching for their ability to improve crew sleep and performance. She also continued loading the Northrop Grumman Cygnus cargo craft with disposable gear before it departs from the Unity module Feb. 8.

Both McClain and Saint-Jacques joined Commander Oleg Kononenko early Tuesday for body mass measurements. Kononenko then moved on to life support maintenance, crew culture studies and radiation measurements aboard the orbital lab.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/29/station-crew-helping-future-orion-explorers/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #92 on: 01/30/2019 06:55 am »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #93 on: 01/30/2019 01:49 pm »
David Saint-Jacques launches a challenge for young Canadians to code for space!

Vancouver, British Columbia, January 30, 2019 —  Tomorrow, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut  David Saint-Jacques, during a space-to-Earth connection with his colleague Joshua Kutryk, will launch the Astro Pi challenge for young Canadians.

In collaboration with the European Space Agency and  Kids Code Jeunesse, the CSA is allowing young Canadians to participate in the  Astro Pi challenge, an annual science and coding competition where students have the opportunity to develop code that could be run on the International Space Station’s unique Raspberry Pi computers, called Astro Pis.

Media representatives who cannot attend the Launch of the Astro Pi challenge event can see it live (or watch the video afterwards) on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

In the afternoon, Joshua Kutryk will be meeting with over 60 Grade 10 students at the H.R. MacMillan Space Centre to talk about his experience as an astronaut. Media representatives are invited to attend the presentation.

Date:           January 31, 2019


Lord Selkirk Elementary School

Time:             9:50 a.m. PT

What:             Launch of the Astro Pi challenge in Canada

Who:              David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

                   Joshua Kutryk, CSA astronaut


Where:          Lord Selkirk Elementary School

                   1750 East 22nd Avenue

                   Vancouver, British Columbia  V5N 2P7

 
H.R. MacMillan Space Centre

Time:           12:30 p.m. PT

What:          Presentation to Grade 10 students

Who:            Joshua Kutryk, CSA astronaut

Where:        H.R. MacMillan Space Centre

                   1100 Chestnut Street

                   Vancouver, British Columbia  V6J 3J9

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #94 on: 01/30/2019 03:02 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/29/2019
 


Bio-Monitor: Today a crewmember swapped out donned hardware with the spare garment and headband hardware to continue the 48 hour data recording session. The primary hardware garment was stowed. Although the ISS is equipped with health and life sciences research tools, the existing instrumentation for continuous and simultaneous recording of several physiological parameters is lacking. To tackle this issue, the Bio-Monitor Commissioning activity tests the Bio-Monitor facility; a wearable garment capable of monitoring relevant physiological parameters for up to 48 hours in a non-invasive and non-interfering way.

Moon Imagery (Optical Nav): Today a crewmember performed operations for the Optical Nav experiment using the Cupola window using the moon as the target point. If a spacecraft loses communication with the ground or with NASA’s Deep Space Network, its crew must navigate just as ancient mariners did, using the moon and stars. The Moon Imagery investigation collects pictures of the moon from the ISS, which are used to calibrate navigation software to guide the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle in case its transponder-based navigation capability is lost. Crewmembers photograph the moon’s phases during one 29-day cycle, providing images of varying brightness to calibrate Orion’s camera software.

Japanese Experiment Module – Exposed Facility (JEM EF): Today crewmembers reconfigured the JEM Airlock by removing the MISSE Transfer Tray and installing the MPEP (Multipurpose Experiment Platform) on to the JEM Airlock Slide table. This reconfiguration is in preparation for NRCSD Mission 15 installations. The JEM-EF is a unique platform on the ISS that is located outside of the Japanese Experiment module (JEM), Kibo (Hope) and is continuously exposed to the space environment. Astronauts exchange payloads/payload facilities from the JEM through the scientific airlock using the JEM Remote Manipulator System. Payloads/payload facilities positioned on the exterior platform focus on Earth observation, as well as, communication, scientific, engineering and materials science experiments.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued Cygnus cargo operations in preparation for the vehicle departure, currently planned for February 8.

Remote Power Control Module (RPCM) LA1A4A_A Trip: This morning after the Life Support Rack (LSR) activation, RPCM LA1A4A_A Remote Power Controller (RPC) 2 tripped open. This RPC, which provides main power to LSR was reported to have tripped following ground commanding LSR to standby mode. Telemetry confirmed the trip was caused by a real overcurrent event. This is the second trip of this RPC since LSR installation.  Ground teams are assessing a forward plan.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #95 on: 01/30/2019 03:41 pm »
Crew Works CubeSats, Life Science and Configures Physics Hardware

Mark Garcia Posted on January 30, 2019

The International Space Station is set to deploy a new series of CubeSats as the Expedition 58 crew configures research hardware to enable a variety of space experiments.

Japan’s Kibo laboratory module airlock has been set up with a small satellite deployer loaded with several CubeSats. Astronaut Anne McClain finished the installation work Wednesday, depressurized the airlock and maneuvered the deployer outside Kibo.

She and fellow astronaut David Saint-Jacques will monitor and photograph the CubeSat deployments planned for Thursday around noon EST. The CubeSats will study Earth’s ionosphere and satellite communication techniques.

McClain next inventoried Rodent Research gear trashing some hardware to make extra space aboard the lab. She later swapped a hard drive on a laptop computer dedicated to meteor observations then attached sensors to her head and chest for the Circadian Rhythms study.

Saint-Jacques installed new electronics on the Kubik incubator upgrading the device that houses biology experiments on seeds, cells and small animals. He later swapped parts in the Combustion Integrated Rack that permits safe research into fuel and flames aboard the orbital lab.

Commander Oleg Kononenko started Wednesday researching microgravity’s effect on heart rate and breathing. He later explored advanced photography tools and techniques to better detect targets of interest on Earth.


Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #96 on: 01/31/2019 02:46 pm »
David Saint-Jacques working on ACME ("Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments")  hardware replacement, today.

http://orbiterchspacenews.blogspot.com/2017/05/studying-flame-behavior-in-microgravity.html
« Last Edit: 01/31/2019 03:29 pm by centaurinasa »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #97 on: 01/31/2019 03:23 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/30/2019

Kubik: Today a crewmember upgraded hardware for the Kubik-6 unit. Kubik is a small controlled-temperature incubator or cooler with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic microgravity experiments such as those using seeds, cells, and small animals.

NanoRacks External Cygnus CubeSat Deployer (NRCSD): Today a crewmember installed NRCSD-15 deployer with the 5 planned cubesats onto the Multipurpose Experiment Platform (MPEP) located on the JEM Airlock slide table. CubeSat deployments are planned to occur tomorrow morning. The NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer is a stackable, modular, ground loaded launch case. Each NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer accommodates up to 6.5U and eight launch cases are stacked for each JEM Airlock opening. The NanoRacks CubeSat Deployer meets the growing demand to deploy CubeSat format satellites from the ISS for a variety of customers.

Bio-Monitor: Today a crewmember doffed the spare Bio-Monitor wearable hardware and stowed the hardware completing a 48-hour data gathering session. Although the ISS is equipped with health and life sciences research tools, the existing instrumentation for continuous and simultaneous recording of several physiological parameters is lacking. To tackle this issue, the Bio-Monitor Commissioning activity tests the Bio-Monitor facility; a wearable garment capable of monitoring relevant physiological parameters for up to 48 hours in a non-invasive and non-interfering way.

Circadian Rhythms: Today a crewmember donned on the Circadian Rhythms hardware to begin a 36-hour recording session. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks.

Node 3 Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Cleaning: Flow measurements taken in October identified reduced air flow to the Cupola from Node 3. Today as part of routine maintenance, the crew cleaned the Node 3 deck IMV starboard fan inlet flow straighteners, inlet silencer, and outlet silencer.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #98 on: 01/31/2019 06:33 pm »
Fiery Research Work and CubeSats Deployed Today

Mark Garcia Posted on January 31, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew set up a variety of combustion research hardware today to look at what happens to high temperatures, fuels and flames in space. The International Space Station also deployed the first set of CubeSats this year.

The Two-Phase Flow Experiment, sponsored by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, investigates the heat transfer caused by boiling liquids in space. Flight Engineer Anne McClain set up a specialized microscope to study the phenomena inside Japan’s Kibo lab module today. Results may inform future designs of high-performance thermal management and cooling systems on Earth and in space.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques opened the Combustion Integrated Rack inside the U.S. Destiny lab module again today for more maintenance work. The Canadian astronaut replaced a control unit and a radiometer inside the fuel and flame research device.

The duo also monitored and photographed several CubeSats deployed into Earth orbit outside Kibo’s airlock today. The CubeSats are inexpensive tiny research satellites that will explore Earth’s ionosphere and study space communication techniques.

Commander Oleg Kononenko, the four-time space station resident from Roscosmos, started Thursday photographing the interior portion of the orbital lab’s Russian segment. The veteran cosmonaut then moved onto life support maintenance and explored ways students and educators can collaborate with space crews.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/01/31/fiery-research-work-and-cubesats-deployed-today/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #99 on: 02/01/2019 02:35 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 1/31/2019

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR): Today, a crewmember installed the Florescence Microscope into the MSPR work volume and ground initiated a one-week checkout in preparation for Space Moss observations during the SpaceX-18 mission. The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. It has two workspaces and a worktable that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

NanoRacks External Cygnus CubeSat Deployer (NRCSD): A crewmember performed photography of the NRCSD-15 mission deploys. The NRCSD is a stackable, modular, ground loaded launch case. Each NRCSD accommodates up to 6.5U and eight launch cases are stacked for each JEM Airlock opening. The NRCSD meets the growing demand to deploy CubeSat format satellites from the International Space Station for a variety of customers.

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): A crewmember replaced hardware on the ACME unit by installing a new mesh power supply and closeout panel. The ACME experiment series being performed in the CIR includes five independent studies of gaseous flames. The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued Cygnus cargo operations in preparation for the vehicle departure, currently planned for February 8.   

Water Storage System (WSS) Rack: The crew configured the Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR) located at LAB1D4 in preparation for WSS tank installation next Monday. In the future, WSS will improve existing resupply/waste water management and iodinated water storage capabilities on ISS. The WSS water storage tanks arrived onboard NG-10. The remaining hardware needed for the rack will be manifested on a subsequent visiting vehicle.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #100 on: 02/01/2019 04:37 pm »
February 01, 2019 
MEDIA ADVISORY M19-00

California Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut Aboard Space Station

Elementary school students from California will have an opportunity to talk with a NASA astronaut aboard the International Space Station next week. The Earth-to-space call will air on NASA television and the agency’s website.

Anne McClain will speak with students from William Brooks and Buckeye elementary schools in El Dorado Hills, California, at 1:35 p.m. EST Tuesday, Feb. 5. Students at both schools have prepared for the event through participation in space station and other space-related STEM events and activities as a part of the schools’ “Year in Space.”

The event will be held at William Brooks Elementary, 3610 Park Drive, El Dorado Hills. Media interested in covering should contact Alicia Smith at [email protected] or 916-747-7654.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. Astronauts living in space on theorbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’sTracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).

Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #101 on: 02/02/2019 04:18 am »
Crew Wraps Up Biomedical Studies; Films Station in Virtual Reality

Catherine Williams Posted on February 1, 2019

A pair of biomedical experiments are wrapping up today aboard the International Space Station as the Expedition 58 crew began its weekend. The orbital residents are also filming a virtual reality (VR) experience and working on plumbing and life support hardware.

Anne McClain of NASA removed sensors from her head and chest this morning that collected data about her circadian rhythm, or “biological clock,” and how it is adapting off Earth. Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques stowed the wearable Bio-Monitor hardware that monitors an astronaut’s vital signs during normal activities with minimum interference.

McClain then set up a VR camera to film a first-person’s view aboard the orbital lab in an immersive, cinematic experience. She finished the workday with Saint-Jacques on orbital plumbing work in the Tranquility module.

The Combustion Integrated Rack received more attention today as Saint-Jacques replaced hardware in the fuel and flame research platform. He also assisted McClain with the VR camera installation, set up audio equipment and filmed an introduction.

Commander Oleg Kononenko also up video gear today in Japan’s Kibo lab module and held a conference with Russian students and educators. The veteran cosmonaut then spent part of the afternoon conducting maintenance on life support equipment in the station’s Russian segment.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/01/crew-wraps-up-biomedical-studies-films-station-in-virtual-reality/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #102 on: 02/02/2019 06:42 am »
Some pics of the TechEdSat-8 deployment were posted on the VK site of Roscosmos


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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #104 on: 02/05/2019 02:28 pm »
Astronaut David Saint-Jacques participates in the unveiling of new exhibition!

Ottawa, Ontario, February 5, 2019 — During a live appearance from space, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will join Peter Schiefke, Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth); and former CSA astronaut Dr. Robert Thirsk to launch a new exhibition on space and health at the Canada Aviation and Space Museum.

During the event, CSA nutrition and exercise specialist, Natalie Hirsch, will lead a “space” exercise session with Saint-Jacques, Thirsk and the audience to demonstrate one of the ways astronauts stay healthy in space.

If time permits, media representatives (on site only) may have the opportunity to ask David Saint-Jacques questions during the question period.

Media representatives who are unable to attend the event can watch it live (or watch the video afterwards) on the CSA’s YouTube channel.

The event will be held in French and English.

Date:           February 7, 2019

Time:           10:40 a.m. ET

What:          Opening of new exhibition

Who:           Peter Schiefke, Parliamentary Secretary to the Prime Minister (Youth)

                     David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

Dr. Robert Thirsk, former CSA astronaut

                 Nathalie Hirsch, CSA nutrition and exercise specialist

 
Where:        Canada Aviation and Space Museum Auditorium

                 11 Aviation Parkway

                 Ottawa, Ontario  K1K 2X5

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #105 on: 02/05/2019 03:24 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/01/2019

Circadian Rhythms: Today a crewmember doffed the Circadian Rhythms hardware. This completes the 3rd session for this increment. Circadian Rhythms investigates the role of synchronized circadian rhythms, or the “biological clock,” and how it changes during long-duration spaceflight. Researchers hypothesize that a non-24-hour cycle of light and dark affects crewmembers’ circadian clocks.

The ISS Experience: Today a crewmember setup the ISS Experience hardware in the US Lab in order to record portions of the CIR ACME reconfiguration and chamber insertion into the CIR rack. ISS Experience creates a virtual reality film documenting daily life aboard the space station. The 8 to 10 minute videos created from footage taken during the six-month investigation cover different aspects of crew life, execution of science aboard the station, and the international partnerships involved. The ISS Experience uses a Z-CAM V1 Pro Cinematic VR (Virtual Reality) 360-degree camera with nine 190° fisheye lenses.

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): Today a crew completed the part 2 of the ACME hardware reconfiguration. The ACME experiment series being performed in the CIR includes five independent studies of gaseous flames. The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth. Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

Universal Waste Management System (UWMS): The crew successfully installed a new double stall enclosure within Node 3 today. During the activity, the crew experienced a water leak while de-mating a Quick Disconnect (QD) for the potable water bus. Approximately 9.5 liters leaked before the bus was isolated by MCC-H flight controllers. The crew worked quickly to re-mate the leaky QD and soak up the water with towels. An alternate QD was then de-mated in order to continue with the installation. The new concept, referred to as the Universal Waste Management System (UWMS), includes favorable features from previous designs while improving on other areas from Space Shuttle and the existing ISS Waste Collection System (WCS) hardware. This double stall enclosure provides privacy for both the Toilet System and the Hygiene Compartment. The starboard side will provide access to the existing toilet and the port side will be used for hygiene until new replacement Toilet System arrives in early 2020.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #106 on: 02/05/2019 04:02 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/04/2019

Kubik: Over the weekend a crewmember performed upgrades, checkout and activation of the Kubik 6 hardware. Samples from Kubik 5 were transferred to Kubik 6 and the Kubik 5 was de-installed and stowed. Kubik is a small controlled-temperature incubator or cooler with removable inserts designed for self-contained, automatic microgravity experiments such as those using seeds, cells, and small animals.

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR): Today crewmembers performed a Manifold #2 high percentage O2 Bottle and Gas Chromatograph (CG) bottle changeout on the front Optics Bench. The CIR includes an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel and oxidizer control, and five different cameras for performing combustion experiments in microgravity.

Marrow: Today a crewmember performed the MARROW breath and Ambient air setup for tomorrow morning’s sample collection and took documentary photos. Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

ISS HAM: Today a crewmember swapped out the Columbus ISS HAM packet module  with a new unit that arrived on 71P. A crewmember also executed a HAM pass with Colégio Campo de Flores, Almada, Portugal. International Space Station Ham Radio (ISS Ham Radio) provides opportunities to engage and educate students, teachers, parents and other members of the community in science, technology, engineering and math by providing a means to communicate between astronauts and the ground HAM radio units.

Water Storage System (WSS) Installation: The crew began the WSS installation in the Lab. Today, the crew assembled the WSS Potable Tank Assembly and installed it into the modified Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR) located at LAB1D4. WSS will improve existing resupply/waste water management and iodinated water storage capabilities on ISS. The WSS water storage tanks arrived onboard NG-10. The remaining hardware needed for the rack will be manifested on a subsequent visiting vehicle.

Northrop Grumman 10 (NG-10) Cygnus Cargo Operations: The crew continued Cygnus cargo operations in preparation for the vehicle departure, currently planned for February 8.

Starboard Radiator Imagery: This afternoon ground teams will position the Starboard Thermal Radiator Rotary Joint (TRRJ) to allow the crew to take pictures of the S1 Radiator. This is done annually to help assess the structural integrity of the radiator and inspect for any previously unidentified damage.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #107 on: 02/05/2019 07:27 pm »
Human, Physics Research as U.S. Spaceship Preps for Departure

Mark Garcia Posted on February 5, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew participated in a suite of psychological, biomedical and physics experiments today. The orbital residents are also getting ready to send off a U.S. cargo craft on Friday.

Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques collaborated today on an experiment that observes how living in a spacecraft for long periods impacts crew behavior. The duo typed personal impressions about working in space in a private journal then took a robotics test to measure cognition. The astronauts also answered a questionnaire to gather more cognitive data before going to sleep.

McClain also collected and stored biological samples for a pair of human research studies looking at physiological changes and negative effects on bone marrow and blood cells. Saint-Jacques looked at how fluid mechanics affects fuel tanks in spaceships and ocean systems on Earth.

Commander Oleg Kononenko focused his day inside the station’s Russian segment. The veteran cosmonaut worked on computers, maintained life support systems and photographed Earth landmarks today.

Friday at 11:10 a.m. EST, Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter will depart the station after 81 days attached to the Unity module. Robotics controllers will remotely guide the Canadarm2 robotic arm to grapple Cygnus overnight. McClain will then command the Canadarm2 on Friday to release Cygnus back into Earth orbit as Saint-Jacques backs her up and monitors the activities.

Cygnus has more to do after its release. It will begin to deploy several sets of CubeSats after it reaches a safe distance from the space station. The U.S. resupply ship will then reenter Earth’s atmosphere in late February over a remote portion of the Pacific Ocean for a fiery but safe destruction.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/05/human-physics-research-as-u-s-spaceship-preps-for-departure/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #108 on: 02/06/2019 05:17 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/05/2019

Marrow: This morning a crewmember collected Breath and Ambient air samples for the Marrow study. Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow.

Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS): Today a crewmember installed the Fluidics hardware and initiated the session 5 autonomous science run. The measurement of liquid displacement within a sphere in microgravity relates to a given kinematic representation of a spacecraft’s fuel tank. The FLUIDICS investigation evaluates the Center of Mass (CoM) position regarding a temperature gradient on a representation of a fuel tank. The observation of capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid layer in a low-gravity environment can provide insights into measuring the existing volume in a sphere.

Lab Utility Outlet Panel (UOP)-4 Cable Reconfiguration: The crew worked to transfer loads from Lab UOP4 J4 to J3 connections and installed a 120 Volts Direct Current (VDC) Power / Ethernet Cable and Cobalt Brick on J4. This allows for a network connection through Ethernet on UOP4 J4 and enables troubleshooting of Payloads Joint Station LAN data with the ZBook Network Management System Laptop.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS): On Monday evening, robotics ground controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to grapple the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) located on the U.S. Lab Payload and Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF). Once the SPDM was grappled by the SSRMS, the SPDM was commanded to release the Lab PDGF and it was maneuvered to the Mobile Base System (MBS) and where it was commanded to grapple the MBS PDGF1. Now that the SPDM is located on MBS PDGF1, it is in a good configuration for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) survey this evening.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #109 on: 02/06/2019 05:18 pm »
Mind and Body Studies as Crew Finalizes Cygnus Packing

Mark Garcia Posted on February 6, 2019

The astronauts onboard the International Space Station continued exploring today how living in space affects their minds and bodies. The Expedition 58 crew also researched fluid physics and prepared a resupply ship for its departure.

Anne McClain of NASA collected blood and urine samples this morning for the Repository physiology study. She spun the samples in a centrifuge then stowed them in a science freezer. She later took a cognition test in support of the Lighting Effects experiment that seeks to improve health and wellness.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques along with McClain answered a pair of questionnaires in support of the Standard Measures and Behavioral Core Measures psychology studies. He also wrapped up a physics study observing the mechanics of fluids in hardware that represents a spacecraft fuel tank.

McClain will be in the cupola Friday at 11:10 a.m. EST and release the U.S. Cygnus resupply ship from the Canadarm2 robotic arm. Saint-Jacques will back her up Friday and monitor the cargo vessel’s departure. The duo is finalizing packing, will install a small satellite deployer in Cygnus then close the hatches on Thursday.

Over in the station’s Russian segment, Commander Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos worked on power supply and battery maintenance in the Zarya module. The long-serving cosmonaut also researched crew psychology and studied radiation exposure.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/06/mind-and-body-studies-as-crew-finalizes-cygnus-packing/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #110 on: 02/07/2019 03:00 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/06/2019

Fluid Dynamics in Space (FLUIDICS): Today a crewmember attempted to run the last two science sessions (2&3) however, an anomaly occurred with the science hardware during run #2. Run #3 was aborted from the timeline until further investigation by the ESA ground teams. The measurement of liquid displacement within a sphere in microgravity relates to a given kinematic representation of a spacecraft’s fuel tank. The FLUIDICS investigation evaluates the Center of Mass (CoM) position regarding a temperature gradient on a representation of a fuel tank. The observation of capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid layer in a low-gravity environment can provide insights into measuring the existing volume in a sphere.

POLAR: Today a crewmember installed the POLAR 3 and 4 units into the Japanese Module. Polar is a Cold Stowage managed facility that provides transport and storage of science samples at cryogenic temperatures (-80ºC) to and from the ISS.

NG-10 Cygnus Departure Prep: Today the crew performed final egress and hatch closure of Cygnus S.S. John Young ahead of its planned un-berth and release on Friday GMT 039 at 16:10 (10:10 CT). Tomorrow the crew will be installing the Install SlingShot deployer and Ubiquitylink payload onto the Cygnus hatch prior to the final Node 1 Nadir close out activities later in the day.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS):  Today, robotics ground controllers powered up the Mobile Servicing System (MSS) and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) to perform a survey of the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE) and Multiple User System for Earth Sensing Facility (MUSES) payloads. After the survey was completed, the SSRMS and SPDM were maneuvered to stow the SPDM on the Mobile Base System (MBS) Payload and Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF) #2. After the SSRMS released the SPDM, the SSRMS was maneuvered onto the Node2 PDGF. Finally, SSRMS released the MBS PDGF #4 and was maneuvered to grapple the Cygnus Power and Video Grapple Fixture (PVGF) in preparation for Cygnus un-berth and release this Friday.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) Very High Data Rate (VHDR) Testing: Today teams began C2V2 testing that will be ongoing through Friday. The purpose of this testing is to help collect data concerning the Reed Solomon errors that occurred during NG-9 Cygnus mission. During today’s testing, both C2V2 receivers maintained signal lock where the errors occurred previously.

Offline vp.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #111 on: 02/07/2019 04:22 pm »
Some news about US EVA ?

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #112 on: 02/08/2019 04:56 am »
Cygnus Ready for Friday Departure and CubeSat Deployments

Mark Garcia Posted on February 7, 2019

Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter is just a day away from completing its tenth mission to the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 crew is training today for Cygnus’ robotic release on Friday and preparing it for one more mission afterward.

Cygnus is in the grips of the Canadarm2 robotic arm today still attached to the Unity module. Robotics controllers will uninstall Cygnus from Unity early Friday and remotely maneuver the space freighter to its release position.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain will take over the robotics controls as David Saint-Jacques from the Canadian Space Agency backs her up inside the cupola. She will command the Canadarm2 to release Cygnus back into space at 11:10 a.m. EST Friday. NASA TV will begin its live coverage of Cygnus’ release starting at 10:45 a.m.

The two astronauts practiced the release of Cygnus today and finished the installation of the Slingshot small satellite deployer inside the spacecraft. Slingshot will eject a set of CubeSats from Cygnus once the cargo vessel reaches a safe distance from the station about eight hours after its release.

Friday’s Cygnus departure will leave a pair of Russian spacecraft docked to the station including the Progress 71 cargo craft and the Soyuz MS-11 crew ship. Two more spaceships are due to visit in March including a demonstration version of SpaceX’s first crew Dragon and the Soyuz MS-12 spacecraft with three new Expedition 59-60 crew members.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/07/cygnus-ready-for-friday-departure-and-cubesat-deployments/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #113 on: 02/08/2019 03:37 pm »
Astronauts Release U.S. Spacecraft from Station

Mark Garcia Posted on February 8, 2019

Northrop Grumman’s Cygnus spacecraft was released from the Canadarm2 at 11:16 a.m. EST and has departed the International Space Station. After an extended mission to deploy several CubeSats in multiple orbits, Cygnus is scheduled to be deorbited on Feb. 25 to enter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean.

Expedition 58 Flight Engineers Anne McClain of NASA and David Saint-Jacques of the Canadian Space Agency used the station’s robotic arm to release the craft, dubbed the “SS John Young”, after ground controllers unbolted the cargo vehicle from the Earth-facing port of the Unity module earlier this morning.

This Commercial Resupply Services contract mission delivered dozens of new and existing investigations as Expedition 58 contributes to some hundreds of science and research studies. Highlights from the new experiments include a demonstration of 3D printing and recycling technology and simulating the creation of celestial bodies from stardust.

The Refabricator is the first-ever 3D printer and recycler integrated into one user-friendly machine. Once it’s installed in the space station, it will demonstrate recycling of waste plastic and previously 3D printed parts already on-board into high-quality filament, or 3D printer “ink.” This recycled filament will be fed into the printer as stock to make new tools and parts on-demand in space. This technology could enable closed-loop, sustainable fabrication, repair and recycling on long-duration space missions, and greatly reduce the need to continually launch large supplies of new material and parts for repairs and maintenance. The demonstration, which NASA’s Space Technology Mission and Human Exploration and Operations Directorates co-sponsored, is considered a key enabling technology for in-space manufacturing. NASA awarded a Small Business Innovation Research contract valued to Tethers Unlimited Inc. to build the recycling system.

The Experimental Chondrule Formation at the International Space Station (EXCISS) investigation will explore how planets, moons and other objects in space formed by simulating the high-energy, low-gravity conditions that were present during formation of the early solar system. Scientists plan to zap a specially formulated dust with an electrical current, and then study the shape and texture of the resulting pellets.

The Crystallization of LRRK2 Under Microgravity Conditions-2 (PCG-16) investigation grows large crystals of an important protein, leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), in microgravity for analysis back on Earth. This protein is implicated in development of Parkinson’s disease, and improving our knowledge of its structure may help scientists better understand the pathology of the disease and develop therapies to treat it. LRRK2 crystals grown in gravity are too small and too compact to study, making microgravity an essential part of this research.  This investigation is sponsored by the International Space Station U.S. National Laboratory, which Congress designated in 2005 to maximize its use for improving quality of life on Earth.

Cygnus launched Nov. 17, 2018, on an Antares 230 rocket from Virginia Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport’s Pad 0A at Wallops, and arrived at the station Nov. 19 for the company’s 10th NASA-contracted commercial resupply mission to the station.

This was the seventh flight of an enhanced Cygnus spacecraft, and the fourth using Northrop Grumman’s upgraded Antares 230 launch vehicle featuring new RD-181 engines that provide increased performance and flexibility.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/08/astronauts-release-u-s-spacecraft-from-station/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #114 on: 02/08/2019 04:26 pm »
After Cygnus NG-10 departure.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #115 on: 02/08/2019 05:39 pm »
Some news about US EVA ?
The present NASA TV schedule doesn´t mentioned any EVA activity.
So I assume, the next EVA will be behind the next Soyuz docking.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #116 on: 02/08/2019 05:45 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/07/2019

SlingShot: Today crewmembers installed two Slingshot deployables (SEOPS-Quantum Radar -1 and -2s) on to the outer hatch of the Cygnus Spacecraft. Also installed in a deployable slot is the UbiquityLink-1 orbit to ground communications hardware. The two passive optical reflector satellites will be released after Cygnus moves away from the ISS. SEOPS’ SlingShot is a small satellite deployment system that fits inside the Cygnus spacecraft’s Passive Common Berthing Mechanism (PCBM). SlingShot can accommodate up to eighteen satellites that are deployed post Cygnus unberth.

Cygnus Departure Preparations: Today, the crew installed the starboard and port Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs), re-installed the Node 1 Nadir thermal cover and closed the Node 1 Nadir hatch. The crew then completed the Pressure Management Device (PMD) setup in preparation for vestibule depress. Cygnus unberth is scheduled for tomorrow morning with release at 16:10 GMT (10:10 AM CT).

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #117 on: 02/09/2019 10:26 pm »
« Last Edit: 02/09/2019 10:49 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #118 on: 02/11/2019 02:36 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/08/2019

Northrop Grumman (NG-10) Cygnus Release: Today, Crew and ground teams utilized the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to unberth the S.S. John Young from Node 1 nadir then released the vehicle at 1616 GMT (10:16 AM CT). This completes eighty-one days of joint ISS/Cygnus operations. Now that Cygnus has departed the ISS, it will be performing several small satellite deployments and operations for other agencies before re-entering the Earth’s atmosphere over the South Pacific on February 25.

Meteor: Today a crewmember swapped out the Meteor laptop AMS hard drive. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Actiwatch Spectrum: Today a crewmember linked the Actiwatch Spectrum hardware to the HRF1 rack to allow ground teams to download stored data. The Actiwatch Spectrum is a waterproof, nonintrusive, sleep-wake monitor worn on the wrist of a crewmember. The device contains an accelerometer for measuring motion and color sensitive photodiodes (a photodetector capable of converting light into voltage) for monitoring ambient lighting. Together, these capabilities enable the Actiwatch Spectrum to be used to analyze circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, and activity.

Simplified Aid for EVA Rescue (SAFER) Test Module Checkout: Crew performed a check out of SAFER 1015 and Test Module seals. The activity measured regulator pressure under flow and no-flow conditions, performed a leak check, and measured the relief valve crack and reseated pressure to satisfy two year on-orbit maintenance requirements.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #119 on: 02/11/2019 08:11 pm »
Spacesuits, Life Science and Robotic Assistant Work Start the Week

Mark Garcia Posted on February 11, 2019

Spacesuit work, robotic assistants as well as exercise and biology studies took up the majority of the Expedition 58 crew’s schedule on Monday. The rest of February at the International Space Station will be primarily science work before March ramps up with crew and cargo missions and spacewalks.

Flight Engineer Anne McClain of NASA opened up the Fluids Integrated Rack and set up protein crystal samples inside a specialized microscope for photographing. The research is supporting a series of Biophysics experiments exploring potential pharmaceutical benefits for humans on and off Earth.

After lunch, McClain spent the rest of the afternoon emptying and refilling water in the U.S. spacesuit cooling loops. She also verified the spacesuits’ ability to transfer high-speed data during usage. NASA is currently targeting the end of March to begin a trio of maintenance spacewalks.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques strapped himself into an exercise bike today to measure his breathing and aerobic capacity. He attached breathing tubes and sensors to himself to help doctors understand the effects of microgravity on pulmonary function and physical exertion.

In the afternoon, he set up a docking station where tiny free-flying robots can mount themselves in Japan’s Kibo laboratory module. Powered by fans and guided by a vision system, the Astrobee autonomous assistants may free up more science time for astronauts and allow mission controllers better monitoring capabilities.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/11/spacesuits-life-science-and-robotic-assistant-work-start-the-week/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #120 on: 02/12/2019 09:02 am »
Amateur radio contact between David Saint-Jacques and Lloydminster students

Lloydminster, Alberta, February 12, 2019 — As part of the Amateur Radio on the International Space Station (ARISS) program, Canadian Space Agency (CSA) astronaut David Saint-Jacques will connect with Lloydminster students and answer their questions on February 13, live from the International Space Station (ISS).

ARISS is an international program aimed at inspiring students worldwide to pursue interests and careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) through amateur radio communications opportunities with the ISS crew. During David Saint-Jacques’ mission, Radio Amateurs of Canada hopes to establish as many as 20 contacts between the astronaut and youth, both in Canada and around the world.

Media are invited to witness this exchange in person.

 
Date:           February 13, 2019
 

Time:           1:00 p.m. MT – beginning of the event

                     1:10 p.m. MT – beginning of the connection with David Saint-Jacques


What:          Amateur radio contact between Earth and space

 
Who:           David Saint-Jacques, CSA astronaut

                 600 students from kindergarten to Grade 9

 
Where:        College Park School (use the front entrance)

                 2115 56 Avenue

                 Lloydminster, AB  T9V 2W2

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #121 on: 02/12/2019 06:36 pm »
Exercise Research and Biology Hardware Checks Aboard Orbital Lab

Mark Garcia Posted on February 12, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew explored space exercise and checked out biology hardware today aboard the International Space Station. The space residents supplemented their research activities and kept the orbital lab systems in tip-top shape.

Daily exercise in space is important so astronauts can fight muscle and bone loss caused by living in weightlessness. Doctors are seeking to optimize workouts for crews to stay in shape for strenuous activities like spacewalks, returning to Earth and adjusting to gravity.

Anne McClain of NASA contributed to that research today strapping into an exercise bike while attached to breathing tubes and sensors. Scientists measured her breathing and aerobic capacity to understand the effects of microgravity on pulmonary function and physical exertion.

Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint-Jacques worked on a pair of incubators throughout Tuesday. He disconnected hardware in the Kubik incubator that houses small biology studies in the Columbus lab module. Afterward, he glided into the Kibo lab module and set up a carbon dioxide meter inside the Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory supporting a wide variety of life sciences.

The commander, Oleg Kononenko of Roscosmos, worked primarily in the station’s Russian segment on Tuesday beginning the day working on life support gear. The highly experienced cosmonaut then moved onto space navigation research before charging the emergency phone inside the Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/12/exercise-research-and-biology-hardware-checks-aboard-orbital-lab/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #122 on: 02/13/2019 02:58 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/11/2019

Astrobee: The crew participated in a conference with the Astrobee payload developer to discuss details of the docking station installation preparation. Following this, they configured and prepared the JEM Astrobee docking station location. The actual docking station installation is currently planned for Friday of this week. When all the hardware arrives on orbit, Astrobee will consist of three self-contained, free flying robots and a docking station for use inside the ISS. The robots are designed to help scientists and engineers develop and test technologies for use in microgravity to assist astronauts with routine chores, and give ground controllers additional eyes and ears on the space station. The autonomous robots, powered by fans and vision-based navigation, perform crew monitoring, sampling, logistics management, and accommodate up to three investigations.

Fluids Integrated Rack Light Microscopy Module (FIR/LMM) Biophysics 5-2 plate exchange: Following the completion of the planned science for plate s/n 2002, the crew removed it from the PACE (Preliminary Advanced Colloids Experiment) LED Base inside the LMM (Light Microscopy Module) AFC (Auxiliary Fluids Container), installed plate s/n 2006, and dispensed oil on the plate. Initial inspection via ground commanding shows 2 of the 4 capillaries in plate 2006 are cracked and the team is assessing a forward plan. LMM/Biophysics-5-2 looks at the relationship between solution convection – the movement of molecules through the fluid – and dense liquid clusters from which protein crystals can form. The main objective of the investigation is to understand why protein crystallization experiments in microgravity have often generated unexpectedly low or high numbers of crystals. Both of these outcomes may negatively affect experiments designed to obtain a small number of well-separated crystals for x-ray structure studies.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Flush: In preparation for a Fan Pump Separator (FPS) R&R next Monday, the crew performed a cooling loop flush on the EMU 3006 today. In addition, they obtained a 60 mL sample from the Displays and Control Module (DCM) for chemical analysis. EMU 3006 FPS had failed to activate during a preventative maintenance activity on January 22.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #123 on: 02/13/2019 02:59 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/12/2019

Human Research Facility (HRF) Urine Setup: The crew set up hardware in preparation for repository activities later this week.  Repository is a storage bank that is used to maintain biological specimens over extended periods of time and under well-controlled conditions. It supports scientific discovery that contributes to our fundamental knowledge in the area of human physiological changes and adaptation to a microgravity environment and provides unique opportunities to study longitudinal changes in human physiology spanning many missions.

Space Acceleration Measurement System II (SAMS II) Screen Cleaning:  As part of the routine periodic maintenance, the crew cleaned lint from the filter screens in the SAMS-II RTS/D1 (Remote Triaxial Sensor Drawer 1) and RTS/D2 locations.  SAMS-II is an ongoing study of the small forces (vibrations and accelerations) on the ISS resulting from the operation of hardware, crew activities, dockings, and maneuvering. Results generalize the types of vibrations affecting vibration-sensitive experiments. Investigators seek to better understand the vibration environment on the ISS.

Nitrogen / Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Tank Uninstall:  Today the crew worked with MCC-H to terminate the transfer of Nitrogen from the NORS Recharge Tank to the ISS Airlock Nitrogen Tanks.  As part of the activity, they removed the fill hose, regulator, then uninstalled and stowed the tank for return on a future cargo vehicle.

Compound Specific Analyzer – Combustion Products (CSA-CP) Sample Pump Failure:  During a scheduled inspection, the crew found that one CSA-CP Sample Pump was failed. The Sample Pump is needed to obtain CSA-CP samples at fire ports. Currently there is only one functional Sample Pump on ISS.  Ground teams are working to manifest a spare pump onboard an upcoming cargo vehicle.

Intra-Module Ventilation (IMV) Measurements:  Yesterday, the crew took periodic measurements of the airflow at IMV ducts in several locations, including Russian Segment to Node 3, Node 3 to Cupola, Airlock to Node 1, Lab to Node 2, Node 2 to Lab, Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) inlet and Node 3 to BEAM.  Teams are currently reviewing the data and will request cleaning if the airflow measurements are below pre-defined limits.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #124 on: 02/13/2019 04:51 pm »
Crew Studies Human Body and Checks Cooling Systems

Mark Garcia Posted on February 13, 2019

Wednesday saw the Expedition 58 crew explore the inner workings of the human body in space and maintain cooling systems aboard the International Space Station.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain spent all day setting up cooling gear inside the U.S. Destiny lab module and Japan’s Kibo lab module. She drained and refilled water pumps inside the Fluid System Servicer and the Internal Thermal Control System. The life support systems help cool the station’s atmosphere and dispel heat generated by electrical systems.

Microgravity’s impact on the human physiology was the focus of Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques’ day. The Canadian Space Agency astronaut collected and stowed his breath, blood and urine samples for a variety of human research experiments. The research is supporting the long term-collection of human biological samples and observing bone marrow and blood changes.

Saint-Jacques also conducted ultrasound scans in the Zvezda service module for the Fluid Shifts study with assistance from Commander Oleg Kononenko and doctors on the ground. That research is seeking to reverse increased head and eye pressure that occurs in space.

Kononenko started Wednesday servicing Russian life support systems. The four-time station resident then spent the afternoon on more space research studying motion coordination, radiation exposure and crew psychology.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/13/crew-studies-human-body-and-checks-cooling-systems/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #125 on: 02/14/2019 03:07 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/13/2019

ISS HAM Pass: The crew participated in the contact with College Park School, Lloydminster, Alberta, Canada. The students ranged from grade 1 to 8 and the questions involved astronaut experiences during launch, interactions with families, working on the ISS, etc. ISS Ham Radio provides opportunities to engage and educate students, teachers, parents and other members of the community in science, technology, engineering and math by providing a means to communicate between astronauts and the ground HAM radio units.

Team Task Switching (TTS) Experiment Survey: The crew completed a Team Task Switching Survey using the Data Collection Tool on a Station Support Computer. The objective of the TTS investigation is to gain knowledge about whether or not crewmembers have difficulty in switching tasks, and apply the results to both the reduction of any negative consequences and improvement of individual and team motivation and effectiveness.

Two-Phase Flow 2 Laptop Setup: The crew relocated the Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) laptop to a suitable area around the MSPR. Following this, the appropriate power cable and Local Area Network (LAN) cable connections were made. This is being performed as part of the preparation for the future Two-Phase Flow 2 investigation. The Two-Phase Flow experiment investigates the heat transfer characteristics of flow boiling in the microgravity environment. This experiment provides a fundamental understanding of the behaviors of bubble formation, liquid-vapor flow in a tube, and how heat is transferred in cooling systems.

Internal Thermal Control System (ITCS) Fluid System Servicer (FSS) Lab and JEM Refill: The crew used the FSS to add ITCS coolant to the Lab Low Temperature Loop (LTL) Pump Package Assembly (PPA) accumulator and Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) ITCS Low and Moderate Temperature Loops. Once the refills were completed, they drained and stowed the FSS and associated jumpers.

Nitrogen (N2) / Oxygen (O2) Recharge System (NORS) Tank Installation: Today the crew installed a NORS O2 tank, mated the O2 Fill Hose to the NORS Manifold, and initiated a gas transfer to the High Pressure O2 System.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #126 on: 02/14/2019 04:39 pm »
Research into How Space Impacts Humans and Physics Continues

Mark Garcia Posted on February 14, 2019

The three residents onboard the International Space Station today worked with a diverse array of science hardware. The trio continues to explore what living in space is doing to their bodies and helped scientists promote healthier humans in space and on Earth.

Astronauts have reported increased head and eye pressure during long-duration space missions. The Expedition 58 crew is researching that phenomenon today to help doctors reverse the upward fluid shifts that affect space residents.

One solution being studied is a special suit that draws fluids such as blood and water toward the lower body to prevent swelling in the face and elevated head and eye pressure. Astronaut Anne McClain tried that suit on today and Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques used an ultrasound device to scan the activity. Commander Oleg Kononenko assisted the duo inside Russia’s Zvezda service module.

Afterward, McClain glided to the opposite end of the station in Japan’s Kibo lab module to work on the Two-Phase Flow fluid physics experiment. She set up and installed the research hardware inside Kibo’s Multi-purpose Small Research Rack. The experiment may enable engineers to design advanced thermal management systems for use on Earth and in space.

Saint-Jacques returned to biomedical studies today collecting and stowing more breath, blood and urine samples for later analysis. The ongoing research is helping scientists understand the long-term space impacts to bone marrow, red blood cells and the overall human physiology.

Saint-Jacques finally reviewed instructions to install a docking station on Friday for new cube-shaped, free-flying robots that will arrive at the station later this year. The Astrobee autonomous assistants may free up more science time for astronauts and allow mission controllers better monitoring capabilities.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/14/research-into-how-space-impacts-humans-and-physics-continues/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #127 on: 02/15/2019 02:17 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/14/2019

Marrow: Today the crew collected breath, ambient air, and blood samples in support of the Marrow investigation.  Marrow looks at the effect of microgravity on bone marrow. It is believed that microgravity, like long-duration bed rest on Earth, has a negative effect on the bone marrow and the blood cells that are produced in the bone marrow. One of the impacts seen on the ground is fat cells growing at the expense of blood-producing cells during prolonged stays in bed.  Blood-producing cells share the same confined space with fat cells within the bone marrow.

Fluid Shifts: The crew performed a repeat of the Fluid Shifts Chibis imaging session originally performed on 21-January-2019. The 21-January session experienced firewall-related video issues on the ground which resulted in a loss of ~33% of the science.  Fluid Shifts is a NASA investigation, divided into Dilution Measurements, Baseline Imaging, and Baseline Imaging with Chibis (Lower Body Negative Pressure). The Fluid Shifts experiment investigates the causes for severe and lasting physical changes to astronaut’s eyes.  Because the headward fluid shift is a hypothesized contributor to these changes, reversing this fluid shift with a lower body negative pressure device is being evaluated as a possible intervention. Results from this study may help to develop preventative measures against lasting changes in vision and prevention of eye damage.

Treadmill 2 (T2) Six-Month Maintenance: The crew completed the 6-month T2 inspection. During this task, the crew inspects the treadbelt slats and screws, cleans the treadmill drive shaft, and vacuums inside the rack and around the treadmill. An unmanned activation and checkout was completed succesfully. Engineering reviewed the data from this checkout and T2 is a Go for operations.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Yesterday afternoon, Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and walked the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to the LAB Power and Data Grapple Fixture (PDGF). Then the SSRMS released Node 2 PDGF and the SSRMS was positioned for the MRM1 survey. At the same time, additional imagery was obtained for the Node 1 Nadir Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Bolt 1-3. Once the MRM1 inspection was completed, the team maneuvered the arm to grapple Node 2 PDGF and released LAB PDGF, then parked the SSRMS and powered it down.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #128 on: 02/15/2019 02:21 pm »
February 15, 2019
MEDIA ADVISORY M19-009

Florida Students to Speak with NASA Astronaut Aboard International Space Station
 
University and high school students from Florida will have an opportunity to talk with a NASA astronaut on the International Space Station next week. The Earth-to-space call will air on NASA Television and the agency’s website.

Anne McClain will answer questions from students at Florida Atlantic University and the Palm Beach County, Broward County, and Miami Dade school districts. The event will take place at 1:25 p.m. EST Friday, Feb. 19, at the Engineering East building of Florida Atlantic University’s Boca Raton campus, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton. Media interested in covering should contact Lisa Metcalf at [email protected] 561-297-3022.

Linking students directly to astronauts aboard the space station provides unique, authentic experiences designed to enhance student learning, performance and interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics.) Astronauts living in space on the orbiting laboratory communicate with NASA’s Mission Control Center in Houston 24 hours a day through the Space Network’sTracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS).
Follow the astronauts on social media at:

https://www.twitter.com/NASA_astronauts

See videos and lesson plans highlighting research on the International Space Station at:

https://www.nasa.gov/stemonstation

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #129 on: 02/15/2019 03:57 pm »
Time Perception Studies, Free-Flying Robotics on Station Schedule

Mark Garcia Posted on February 15, 2019

The Expedition 58 crew is helping scientists today understand how astronauts perceive time and orient themselves when living in space. The orbital residents are also working on CubeSat and free-flying robotics hardware aboard the International Space Station.

Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques wore virtual reality gear for the Time Perception experiment sponsored by the European Space Agency. The study takes place in the Columbus lab module and is researching the hypothesis that time and depth perception are altered in microgravity.

McClain of NASA started the day inside the Kibo lab module, opened the airlock and removed the CubeSat deployer. She disassembled and stowed the hardware in Kibo’s logistics module after it ejected a series of CubeSats into Earth orbit in January.

Astrobee is a new experimental program that uses three small free-flying assistants and is due to begin operations soon. Saint-Jacques installed the Astrobee docking station in the Unity module where the cube-shaped robotic helpers will be able to attach themselves in the future. The autonomous free-flyers may be able to help astronauts with simple duties and enhance monitoring abilities on the orbital lab.

Commander Oleg Kononenko spent Friday morning exploring how crew activities and the Earth’s magnetic field impact the structure of the space station. The experienced cosmonaut moved into the afternoon replacing dust filters before researching space navigation techniques.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/15/time-perception-studies-free-flying-robotics-on-station-schedule/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #130 on: 02/19/2019 02:21 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/15/2019

Astrobee: Today the crew participated in a final crew conference, followed by the Docking Station installation in the JEM.  When the satellites arrive on orbit (starting with the NG-11 vehicle), Astrobee will consist of self-contained, free flying robots and a docking station for use inside the ISS. The robots are designed to help scientists and engineers develop and test technologies for use in microgravity, to assist astronauts with routine chores, and give ground controllers additional eyes and ears on the space station. The autonomous robots, powered by fans and vision-based navigation, perform crew monitoring, sampling, logistics management, and can accommodate up to three investigations

Nanoracks CubeSats Deployer (NRCSD) Removal: The crew removed the CubeSat Deployers from the MPEP (Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform), removed the MPEP and Passive Capture Mechanism from JEM Air Lock (JEMAL) Slide Table, and removed the MPEP Adapter Plate.  These are clean-up activities following the successful NRCSD-15 CubeSat deployment on January 31 and prepare the JEMAL for the next user.  The NRCSD is a self-contained CubeSat deployer system for small satellites staged from the ISS.

Time Perception: Using a head-mounted Oculus Rift display, headphones, finger trackball and laptop computer, the crew performed the Tim Perception science sessions.  A program on the laptop induces visual and audio stimuli to measure a subject’s response to spatial and time perception in a microgravity environment. The accurate perception of objects in the environment is a prerequisite for spatial orientation and reliable performance of motor tasks. Time is fundamental to motion perception, sound localization, speech, and fine motor coordination.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #131 on: 02/19/2019 02:23 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/18/2019

Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient (SODI-DSC): Today, a crewmember changed-out the memory flash disk from the SODI hardware. The Selectable Optical Diagnostics Instrument – Diffusion and Soret Coefficient (SODI-DSC) experiment will study diffusion in six different liquids over time in the absence of convection induced by the gravity field.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM): Today, a crewmember relocated the SSC18 laptop from the FGB to the Node 1 for use by the EarthKAM payload. EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Fan Pump Separator Remove and Replace (R&R): On January 22, the FPS in EMU 3006 would not activate during a planned loop scrub activity. Today, the failed FPS was removed from EMU 3006 and replaced with an on-orbit spare. Following the R&R, the crew was able to prime the Water Pump and reconfigure the EMU. On Wednesday, the crew will perform a Return to Service Checkout on EMU 3006 as well as perform an EMU Data Recorder (EDAR) installation.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #132 on: 02/19/2019 11:39 pm »
Experimental Fuel Hardware, Astrophysics and Life Science Fill Crew Day

Mark Garcia Posted on February 19, 2019

The International Space Station is hosting a robotic experiment that may help enable and refuel future missions to the moon and Mars. The Expedition 58 crew installed that hardware today then worked on a variety of life science, astrophysics and combustion science gear.

The Robotic Refueling Mission-3 (RRM3) experiment will demonstrate transferring and storing fuels and coolants such as liquid methane and a cryogenic fluid in space. Astronauts Anne McClain and David Saint-Jacques installed the RRM3 hardware today inside Japan’s Kibo lab module airlock. The gear will be deployed outside Kibo then transferred to an external logistics carrier. Once there, the Dextre “robotic hand” will begin operations demonstrating fluid transfers with a set of specialized tools.

The two astronauts also split their time conducting maintenance on a pair of space incubators. McClain worked on a mouse habitat replacing filters inside Kibo’s Cell Biology Experiment Facility. Saint-Jacques swapped a carbon dioxide controller in the Space Automated Bioproduct Lab (SABL). SABL supports research into microorganisms, small animals, animal cells, tissue cultures and small plants.

McClain also replaced a laptop computer hard drive dedicated to the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer-2 experiment. The experiment is housed on the on the station’s truss structure and searches for antimatter, dark matter and measures cosmic rays. She later cleaned up gear supporting gaseous flame studies inside the Combustion Integrated Rack.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 59 crew members are a month away from joining the three orbital residents aboard the space station. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch are in Star City, Russia in final training before their March 14 launch to the orbital lab.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/19/experimental-fuel-hardware-astrophysics-and-life-science-fill-crew-day/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #133 on: 02/20/2019 02:47 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/19/2019

Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3): Today crewmembers installed the RRM3 hardware on the JEM Airlock slide table. Robotic Refueling Mission 3 (RRM3) demonstrates the first transfer and long term storage of liquid methane, a cryogenic fluid, in microgravity. The ability to replenish and store cryogenic fluids, which can function as a fuel or coolant, can help enable long duration journeys to destinations like the Moon and Mars.

JAXA Mouse Mission: Today a crewmember attached Odor filters into the Mouse habitat Cell Biology Experiment Facility (CBEF) unit in preparation for upcoming SpaceX-17 mission. The purpose of this mission is to analyze any alterations of the gene expression patterns in several organs and the effects on the germ-cell development of mice exposed to a long-term space environment.

Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL): Today a crewmember replaced CO2 Incubator Controllers into SABL1 and SABL2. CO2 levels inside the SABLs were then measured. The Space Automated Bioproduct Laboratory (SABL) supports a wide variety of experiments in the life, physical and material sciences with a focus on supporting research of biological systems and processes. It has over 23 liters of temperature controlled volume with LED lighting for scientific hardware and experiments. It can be fitted to provide 5% CO2 for cell cultures and has two USB 2.0 ports and two Ethernet LAN connections. It also has switchable 28vdc and 5vdc power supplies for experiment use.

CSA Comm and Outreach (CSA Video): Today a crewmember recorded two Educational outreach video events. Prime objective is to document and support communications and outreach activities related to the Canadian space program and the ISS utilization in particular.

Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS)-02: Today a crewmember replaced the Ultrabay hard drive on the AMS dedicated Laptop. AMS-02 is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector that uses the unique environment of space to advance knowledge of the universe and lead to the understanding of the universe’s origin by searching for antimatter, dark matter and measuring cosmic rays.

Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME): Today the crew removed ACME hardware items from storage and consolidated them with other ACME hardware. The ACME experiment series being performed in the CIR includes five independent studies of gaseous flames. The primary goals of ACME are to improve fuel efficiency and reduce pollutant production in routine fuel combustion activities on Earth.  Its secondary goal is to improve spacecraft fire prevention through innovative research focused on materials flammability.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #134 on: 02/20/2019 04:26 pm »
Astronauts Focus on Spacesuits, High-Temp Physics and Storm Photography

Mark Garcia Posted on February 20, 2019

Spacesuit servicing and high-temperature physics kept the crew busy today aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 astronauts also researched meteorology from the station and explored more Earth phenomena from space.

Astronaut David Saint-Jacques is returning a U.S. spacesuit to service today inside the U.S. Quest airlock. He verified successful installation of suit components and checked for water leaks in the suit at full operational pressure. NASA is planning a set of maintenance spacewalks at the station planned for March 22, 29, and April 8.

In the Kibo lab module from Japan, astronaut Anne McClain cleaned sample cartridges in a specialized thermo-physical research device called the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace. The high-temperature facility levitates, solidifies and melts samples that may contribute to the synthesis of new materials difficult to achieve on Earth.

She later set up camera hardware for the Tropical Cyclone experiment to demonstrate storm predictions from the station. McClain targeted a moonlit Typhoon Oma today off the coast of Queensland, Australia from inside the cupola.

Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on a suite of science experiments Wednesday in the Russian segment of the station. The veteran cosmonaut photographed terrestrial landmarks to document forest conditions and the effects of natural and man-made disasters. He also studied how space impacts the cardiovascular system and the piloting skills of a cosmonaut.

Back on Earth, three Expedition 59 crew members are preparing for their March 14 launch to the orbital lab aboard the Soyuz MS-12 crew ship. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch are in Star City, Russia for final training before heading to the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan on Feb. 26.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/20/astronauts-focus-on-spacesuits-high-temp-physics-and-storm-photography/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #135 on: 02/21/2019 02:47 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/20/2019

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): Today a crewmember cleaned the sample holder and installed a sample cartridge into the ELF facility. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method. With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

TROPICAL CYCLONE: Today a crewmember performed the Tropical Cyclone camera setup to capture imagery of Typhoon Oma in the Pacific Ocean through the Cupola. The Cyclone Intensity Measurements from the ISS (Tropical Cyclone) investigation demonstrates the feasibility of studying powerful storms from space, which would be a major step toward alerting populations and governments around the world when a dangerous storm is approaching.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Fan Pump Separator Return to Service Checkout: The crew performed an extensive checkout of the newly installed FPS by performing a gas leak test at the maximum operating suit pressure and a long-duration water leak test. The checkout was considered successful with no leaks detected. On January 22, the FPS in EMU 3006 failed to activate during a planned loop scrub activity.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) 3006 Data Recorder (EDaR) Install: The crew successfully installed EDaR onto EMU 3006. EDaR is a new system that provides real-time data storage from EMU systems and increases the rate in which EMU telemetry is sent to ground controllers.

Robotics Operations: Overnight, Ground Robotic Controllers commanded the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) to walkoff from Node 2 to the Mobile Base System (MBS) and pick up the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM). This is in preparation for Materials International Space Station Experiment-Flight Facility (MISSE-FF) troubleshooting operations that are scheduled on Thursday, February 21. On December 31, 2018, MISSE-FF lost health and status data during commanding to prepare the platform for installation of new MISSE Sample Carriers (MSCs). This troubleshooting will have the SPDM soft-dock four MSCs one at a time to see if health and status returns.

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #136 on: 02/21/2019 06:39 pm »
Virtual Reality Filming, Spacesuit Work Highlight Day on Station

Mark Garcia Posted on February 21, 2019

Virtual Reality Film, Spacesuit Work Highlight Day on Station

Virtual reality filming and spacesuit cleaning highlighted the day aboard the International Space Station. The Expedition 58 crew also configured a diverse array of life science and physics hardware.

NASA astronaut Anne McClain set up a virtual reality camera inside the Tranquility module after lunch today. She has been filming hours of footage this month depicting a first-person’s view of life throughout the station. The final film will be an immersive, cinematic experience to educate audiences on Earth about life in space.

McClain started the day installing mouse habitat gear inside the Cell Biology Experiment Facility. The research device, located in Japan’s Kibo lab module, will house mice for an upcoming accelerated aging and disease study.

Flight Engineer David Saint-Jacques was back on spacesuit duty today scrubbing cooling loops and checking the conductivity of water samples. The astronaut from the Canadian Space Agency also tested cables inside the Materials Science Research Rack. The refrigerator-sized rack explores chemical and thermal properties of materials such as metals, alloys and polymers to create new and improved elements and applications.

In the Russian segment of the orbital lab, Commander Oleg Kononenko worked on ventilation systems and collected air samples from the Zarya and Zvezda service modules. The veteran cosmonaut also photographed hardware for a blood pressure study and tested Earth observation techniques using a camera equipped with small ultrasound emitters.

Back on Earth in Star City, Russia, three Expedition 59 crew members have wrapped up two days of classes and tests qualifying for their March 14 launch to the orbital lab. Commander Alexey Ovchinin and Flight Engineers Nick Hague and Christina Koch will end their stay at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on Feb. 26 and fly to the Baikonur Cosmodrome launch site in Kazakhstan. The trio will lift off inside the Soyuz MS-12 crew ship and take a six-hour ride to their new home in space.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2019/02/21/virtual-reality-filming-spacesuit-work-highlight-day-on-station/

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Re: Expedition 58 Thread
« Reply #137 on: 02/22/2019 01:20 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 2/21/2019

The ISS Experience: Today a crewmember performed the ISS Experience camera setup in the Node-3 to capture a recording session of nominal crew activities. The ISS Experience creates a virtual reality film documenting daily life aboard the space station. The 8 to 10 minute videos created from footage taken during the six-month investigation cover different aspects of crew life, execution of science aboard the station, and the international partnerships involved.  The ISS Experience uses a Z-CAM V1 Pro Cinematic VR (Virtual Reality) 360-degree camera with nine 190° fisheye lenses.

Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1): Today a crewmember performed troubleshooting steps for the MSRR facility in order to verify connectivity between the facility and the Master Controller. The MSRR-1 is used for basic materials research in the microgravity environment of the ISS. MSRR-1 can accommodate and support diverse Experiment Modules (EMs). Many material types, such as metals, alloys, polymers, semiconductors, ceramics, crystals, and glasses, can be studied to discover new applications for existing materials and new or improved materials.

JAXA Mouse Mission: A crewmember performed a configuration change for the upcoming SpaceX-17 mission. This involved installing new ammonia sensors and the Micro-G interface units and setting the connections to allow the ground to perform checkouts. The purpose of this mission is to analyze any alterations of the gene expression patterns in several organs and the effects on the germ-cell development of mice exposed to a long-term space environment.

Extravehicular Mobility Units (EMU) 3006 Loop Scrub, and Iodination: Following this week’s Fan Pump Separator replacement, the crew performed EMU 3006 water loop scrub and then acquired and tested water samples for conductivity. EMU Loop Scrubs are required preventive maintenance needed to remove any chemical and biological contaminants from the EMU transport loop.

Waste and Hygiene Compartment (WHC) Pump Separator Replacement:  Today the crew reported that the Check Pump Separator indicator light could no longer be cleared using troubleshooting procedures. Ground specialists declared the hardware failed and the crew completed the replacement using an on-board spare.  The Pump Separator and WHC System is now performing nominally.

Robotic Operations:  Yesterday afternoon, the Robotics Ground Controllers maneuvered the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Arm2 as required to un-stow the Robot Micro Conical Tool #2 (RMCT2) from the SPDM Tool Holder Assembly (THA). Then they maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and SPDM to the start position for the Material on ISS Experiment (MISSE) troubleshooting activities scheduled later today.

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