Author Topic: Expedition 57 Thread  (Read 22725 times)

Online Joachim

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #80 on: 10/31/2018 10:45 AM »
And a second photo from Alex Gerst

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #81 on: 10/31/2018 01:37 PM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/30/2018
 


Binary Colloidal Alloy Test – Cohesive Sediment (BCAT-CS):  Today, the crew transferred images to the Station Support Computer (SSC), replaced the SB-800 Flash batteries, verified the camera alignment and focus are still intact, and re-set the intervalometer.  BCAT-CS continues to produce interesting data resulting in an extension past the original 2-4 week run duration.  BCAT-CS focuses on the study of forces between particles that cluster together by using sediments of quartz and clay particles. Conducting the research in the microgravity environment of the ISS makes it possible to separate the forces acting on the particles over a short range (adhesive forces) versus those acting over a long range (cohesive forces). The quartz/clay system is commonly found in a wide variety of environmental settings (such as rivers, lakes, and oceans) and plays an important role in technological efforts related to deep-sea hydrocarbon drilling and carbon dioxide sequestration.

Echo Setup and Stow:  The crew retrieved the Echo hardware and deployed it in the Columbus module so the ground could perform maintenance activities. The purpose of the Echo investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system, equipped with motorized probes controlled by flight controllers on the ground. Additionally, this investigation serves to perform the commissioning of the Echo instrument, which is planned to be used for the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) Vascular Echo experiment in the future.

GRIP Seated Science Session:  The crew completed the GRIP seated session, which is second of three GRIP activities for the week.  European Space Agency (ESA)’s GRIP investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects.  Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments. Data from the GRIP experiment may also support design and control of haptic interfaces used in challenging environments such as space, as well as provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Vegetable Production System (Veggie):  Today, the crew increased the fan speed to the high setting for Veggie. This was performed to help lower the higher than expected moisture levels in the plant pillow wicks. Veggie is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.  The VEG-03G experiment is currently running in the Veggie facility.

Life Science Glovebox (LSG) Outfitting:  Today, the crew successfully integrated the LSG Core Facility (CF), which arrived on HTV7, with the Avionics Package (AP), which arrived on SpX-15.  Afterwards, the crew installed the hardware into the Zero-G Stowage Rack (ZSR). Tomorrow, the crew will complete the on-orbit configuration of LSG with commissioning planned for November 12th. The LSG is a sealed work area that accommodates life science and technology investigations in a “workbench” type environment. Due to its large enclosed volume of around 450 Liters, almost twice the size of the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), two crew members can work in the LSG simultaneously.

Lab Waste Water Bus Reconfiguration:  As a follow up to yesterday’s attempt to reconfigure the water bus for the newly installed Life Support Rack (LSR), ground teams reviewed photos of the o-rings and the poppet on the male side of the Quick Disconnect (QD) and determined it was nominal. Today, the crew successfully completed the Lab Waste Water Bus reconfiguration.

Offline theonlyspace

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #82 on: 10/31/2018 03:18 PM »
When the new crew goes up in late November or  early December on Soyuz MS 11 to join the three crew Exp 57  will they be considered Exp 57 or 58? Then in April when the new 3 crew joins them will it still be Exp 58 or 59? The numbering of the crews have gotten messed up with Soyuz MS 1O failure.

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #83 on: 10/31/2018 03:42 PM »
It will be Exp. 58 when the MS-09 leaves on Dec. 20

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #84 on: 11/01/2018 06:32 PM »
An amazing view of SPDM "Dextre" today !  8)
« Last Edit: 11/01/2018 06:35 PM by centaurinasa »

Online jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #85 on: 11/02/2018 08:30 AM »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/31/2018
 


Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Manifold Bottle Replacement: In support of part 2 of the CIR / Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) / Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-FIELD) Flames operations, the crew removed the 30% ethylene, 70% nitrogen fuel bottle and replaced it with a 100% methane fuel bottle today.  For E-Field Flames, an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less pollution and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF) Sample Holder Insertion: The crew performed an ELF sample holder insertion. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility, thermophysical properties of high temperature melts are measurable and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.  ELF typically processes oxide samples, but is also capable of processing semiconductors, alloys, and metals.

Grip Supine Science Session: The crew was scheduled to perform the third part of Grip science tasks (third out of three this week) in the supine position. However, the session was only partially completed. Data is being downlinked and the ground team is discussing further action. ESA’s Grip investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects. Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments. Data from the GRIP experiment may also support design and control of haptic interfaces used in challenging environments such as space, as well as provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Life Science Glovebox (LSG) Final Integration and Closeout: Today the crew removed the front launch panel and work volume launch locks and deployed the LSG work volume.  After removing door pip pins and the cable harness block, they installed the fan electronics box.  When connecting the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) lines, JAXA noted a drop in accumulator quantity and asked the crew to disconnect the lines.  LSG lines were flown wet so the drop was unexpected.  The accumulator quantity continued to decrease slightly following the demate of the lines and then stabilized, which is thought to be due to the gas trap removing air from the system.  Teams are standing down on operations for today while they discuss the forward plan.  Commissioning is planned for November 12th.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #86 on: 11/03/2018 02:38 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/01/2018

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) Burst Disc Removal: The crew removed the burst discs from the argon and checked gas manifolds in the CIR Gas Chromatography (GC) system.  These burst discs are considered redundant with the pressure relief valves in the system and issues with the helium burst disc have occurred in the past.  Following this activity, the valves for all three gas bottles were opened.  The GC will be used with the future Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiment (ACME) investigation entitled Burning Rate Emulator (BRE), which focuses on spacecraft fire prevention.

Gravitational References for Sensimotor Performance:  Reaching and Grasping (GRASP): The crew performed three versions of the GRASP seated position science session.  GRASP is intended to provide insight into how the central nervous system integrates information from different sensory modalities, encoded in different reference frames, to coordinate movements of the hand with objects in the environment.  Performed on the ISS, in conjunction with a series of experiments performed on the ground, GRASP explores the interaction among all of the various sensory cues.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) Crew Conference and Procedure Review: The crew participated in a crew conference and procedure review in preparation for the HTV-7 release next week.  The HTV-7 HSRC will return the JAXA Low Temp Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG4) samples to the ground.  HSRC demonstrates re-entry and retrieval techniques to return experimental samples from ISS research back to Earth. HSRC has navigation, guidance, and control systems, including a Reaction Control System (RCS), and can conduct controlled re-entry to a target point on Earth, while keeping an environment of less than 4G for return.

Veg-03G Plant Thinning and Pillow Prime: The crew thinned the plants as needed so that only one plant per pillow remains.  Multiple seeds are germinated in each plan pillow and this activity removes the smallest plants.  The ground and crew noted some of the plants were too small to thin today and these will be thinned at a later time. The crew also performed the pillow prime, which involves the addition of 15ml of water to each plant pillow to support continued growth.  Veg-03G is currently in a 28 day growth cycle which began on October 25 for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03 G/H/I testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as a test crops.

Systems Operations Data File (SODF) Emergency Procedure Update: Today, the crew updated the hard copy Fire Emergency Book with changes to account for which breathing mask to prepare and don per established criteria.

Online rdale

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #87 on: 11/03/2018 10:16 PM »
Ed Sheeran stopped by the space station before a concert in Houston tonight...

http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-11-03-Sat-1600_trim.mp3

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #88 on: 11/05/2018 08:05 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/02/2018

Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-7 (ACE-T7) Sample Configuration:  The crew configured LMM (Light Microscopy Module) for the ACE-T-7 science run.  The ACE-T-7 module was processed prior to this increment, and this run will allow investigators to observe the structures following longer-term evolution.  The experiment involves the design and assembly of complex three-dimensional structures from small particles suspended within a fluid medium. These “self-assembled colloidal structures” are vital to the design of advanced optical materials and active devices. In the microgravity environment, insight is provided into the relation between particle shape and interparticle interactions on assembly structure and dynamics.

Gravitational References for Sensimotor Performance: Reaching and Grasping (GRASP):  The crew successfully performed three versions of the GRASP quasi free-floating science session.  GRASP is intended to provide insight into how the central nervous system integrates information from different sensory modalities, encoded in different reference frames, to coordinate movements of the hand with objects in the environment.  Performed on the ISS, in conjunction with a series of experiments performed on the ground, GRASP explores the interaction between all of the various sensory cues.

Plant Hab-01 Science Carrier 2 Harvest:  The crew performed the harvest on the science carrier 2 plants.  Growth of the plants was initiated on September 18 and similar to the plants grown in science carrier 1, the plants grew more slowly than expected.  Although there was no real issue with the slower growth, only one of the two plant harvests was performed as a result.  The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between various Arabidopsis plant lines grown in space and on Earth. This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

Plasma Kristal-4 Experiment campaign 5:  The crew performed the familiarization session in preparation for the science run next week.  PK-4 is a scientific payload for performing research in the field of ‘Complex Plasmas’: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations:  On Thursday evening, Robotic Ground Controllers powered up the MSS and maneuvered the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS) and the Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator (SPDM) Body to perform a survey of the SPDM Latching End Effector (LEE) snare cables using an External High Definition Camera. They then maneuvered SSRMS and SPDM to approach and stow SPDM on the Mobile Base System (MBS) Power Data Grapple Fixture 2 (PDGF2).

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #89 on: 11/05/2018 08:08 PM »
New Crops Planted Aboard the International Space Station

James Cawley Posted on November 5, 2018

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor planted two new crops in a special garden aboard the International Space Station on Thursday, Oct. 25. If all goes well, the ‘Red Russian’ kale and ‘Dragoon’ lettuce, will be ready to enjoy in time for Thanksgiving.

The lettuce seeds arrived at the station in “plant pillows,” which are needed because of the way water moves in microgravity. Auñón-Chancellor placed the plant pillows atop a root mat, which she primed with water. She installed them in the station’s Veggie plant growth system, and completed her sowing by adding water to the growth chamber’s reservoir.

These plants are part of experiment Veg-03 G – NASA has been successfully growing veggies aboard station since 2014. The latest experiment will provide astronauts with vitamins C, K and potassium, not to mention a welcome addition to their turkey day table 250 miles above Earth.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/kennedy/2018/11/05/new-crops-planted-aboard-the-international-space-station/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #90 on: 11/05/2018 08:09 PM »
Astronauts Prepare for Japanese Cargo Ship Departure

Mark Garcia Posted on November 5, 2018

A pair of Expedition 57 astronauts trained for the release of a Japanese resupply ship Wednesday after a 41-day mission at the International Space Station. Japan’s seventh cargo ship, H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7), has one more mission though after it departs the orbital lab.

If all goes as planned, astronaut Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release the HTV-7, also called the Kounotori, Wednesday at 11:50 a.m. EST. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will back up Gerst in the cupola monitoring the vehicle and its telemetry as it slowly backs away from the space station. The two astronauts reviewed departure procedures and practiced robotics controls on a computer today. NASA TV will broadcast live the space freighter’s departure beginning at 11:30 a.m.

Kounotori was captured Sept. 27 and delivered external station batteries and hardware to be configured during a pair of upcoming spacewalks. The resupply ship also replenished the station with advanced science experiments and equipment to benefit humans on Earth and in space.

However, it has one more payload to deliver for splashdown on Earth before the vehicle burns up harmlessly over the Pacific Ocean. The HTV-7 will release a small reentry capsule packed with test cargo for retrieval by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The splashdown mission is a test of JAXA’s ability to return small payloads from space for quick delivery to researchers on Earth.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev worked on science and maintenance tasks throughout Monday in the orbital lab’s Russian segment. He started out researching how the space environment and solar radiation affects plasma-dust crystals. Prokopyev finished up his day photographing the condition of the Zvezda service module interior panels before disposing of obsolete hardware in the Progress 70 resupply ship.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/05/astronauts-prepare-for-japanese-cargo-ship-departure/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #91 on: 11/06/2018 06:40 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/05/2018

Plant Habitat: Today, the crew wrapped plant samples into foil packs and placed them into Minus Eighty Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI)-3 and the Plant Habitat facility was cleaned. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility conducting plant bioscience research on the ISS. The space environment is stressful for all living organisms. Understanding how plants respond will help crews on future missions successfully grow plants for food and oxygen generation. The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between plants grown in space and on Earth.  This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC): The crew completed Part 1 of the HTV Capsule Assembly including the assembly of the Cylindrical Support Cone Section, Capsule Plate Section and the acceleration/pressure data logger which was taped to the sample box lid. The HSRC is designed to return relatively small payloads to the ground.  The HSRC is 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return.

Plasma Kristall (PK)-4: The crew performed video setup and checkout, connected Gas Supply hoses (Argon and Neon) and verified valve functionality. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas” which are low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles – so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

H-II Transfer Vehicle 7 (HTV7) Departure Preparation:  The crew reviewed HTV-7 departure materials including HTV Rendezvous Review and HTV Departure Review. They also completed Robotics Onboard Trainer (ROBoT) Release Session. Additionally, the crew removed the smoke detector from the vehicle prior to departure. HTV-7 is scheduled to unberth from the ISS on Wednesday, November 7.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #92 on: 11/06/2018 06:42 PM »
Astronauts Ready Japanese Ship as Cosmonaut Works Russian Space Science

Mark Garcia Posted on November 6, 2018

Japan’s seventh resupply ship to the International Space Station is packed and readied for departure Wednesday morning. However, the Japanese cargo ship, H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7), has one more delivery mission before it burns up safely over the Pacific Ocean.

Station skipper Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) will command the Canadarm2 robotic arm to release the HTV-7 at 11:50 a.m. EST Wednesday. It will spend about an hour maneuvering safely away from the station on a trajectory to begin its next mission. Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will monitor the vehicle until it reaches a point about 200 meters from the space station. NASA TV begins its live coverage of the departure Wednesday at 11:30 a.m.

The HTV-7 will fire its deorbit engines Saturday for a fiery but safe ending to its mission after 41 days attached to the station’s Harmony module. Before the HTV-7 self-destructs in Earth’s atmosphere it will release a small reentry capsule loaded with test cargo for splashdown in the Pacific Ocean near the Japanese islands. The capsule will be retrieved by personnel from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency to test the space partner’s ability to safely return precious space cargo for analysis on Earth.

As the two Expedition 57 astronauts packed the cargo ship, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev continued his space physics research, photo inspections and inventory updates. The cosmonaut explored how microgravity and the Sun impact plasma-dust crystals. Prokopyev also photographed the condition of the station’s Russian segment then updated the station’s inventory system.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/06/astronauts-ready-japanese-ship-as-cosmonaut-works-russian-space-science/

Online rdale

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #93 on: 11/06/2018 09:05 PM »
Expedition 57 took part in Expedition 56's plaque hanging at the end of the day...

http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-11-06-Tue-1530_trim.mp3

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #94 on: 11/07/2018 05:44 PM »
ISS configuration after HTV-7 departure.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #95 on: 11/08/2018 04:21 AM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/06/2018

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (JAXA LT PCG): The crew retrieved JAXA LT PCG samples from the General Laboratory Active Cryogenic ISS Experiment Refrigerator (GLACIER)1 unit and stowed them in the H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) Capsule Carrier. The goal of the JAXA LT PCG experiment is to produce high quality protein crystals in a microgravity environment at a low temperature.

HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC): The crew completed Parts 2 and 3 of the HTV Capsule Assembly. They also completed final closeout of the Capsule Support Plate on the HTV-7 bulkhead prior to vestibule demating. The HSRC is designed to return relatively small payloads to the ground. The HSRC is 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return. Splashdown is scheduled to occur at 4:06 pm (CT) on Saturday, November 10.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew initiated the second of four PK-4 experiment runs with the start of Particle Trapping via the European Physiology Module (EPM) laptop commanding using Neon Gas. This will allow clouds of particles to be captured inside the PK-4 chamber. Between the two scripts, it is desired to perform four successful trappings. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas” which are low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles – so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

HTV7 Departure Preparations:  The crew completed loading ~74 Cargo Transfer Bag Equivalent (CTBEs) of trash into the HTV vehicle. The crew configured the vestibule for demate by removing Air Revitalization System (ARS) jumper, Intermodular Ventilation (IMV) supply jumper, 1553/ENET A and B jumper, and disconnecting the Node 2 HTV channel 2 power jumper. They also installed the Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) Controller Panel Assemblies (CPAs). HTV-7 is scheduled to unberth tomorrow, November 7.

Life Support Rack (LSR) Ground Initial Activation and Checkout:  The ground began LSR activation and checkout, which will continue throughout the next several days. LSR is an ESA technology demonstrator for closed loop air revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #96 on: 11/08/2018 04:23 AM »
Astronauts Release Japanese Spaceship

Mark Garcia Posted on November 7, 2018

Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency), with back-up support from NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, used the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm to release a Japanese cargo spacecraft at 11:51 a.m. EST. At the time of release, the space station was flying 254 miles over the northern Pacific Ocean. Earlier, ground controllers used the robotic arm to unberth the cargo craft.

After release, a new, small reentry capsule will be deployed from the unpiloted H-II Transfer Vehicle-7 (HTV-7) of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Designed by JAXA and assembled by the station crew, the conically shaped capsule measures 2 feet in height and 2.7 feet in width. The project is a technology demonstration designed to test JAXA’s ability to return small payloads from the station for expedited delivery to researchers.

HTV-7 will be a safe distance away from the space station after the last of several deorbit maneuvers. The return capsule will be ejected from a hatchway after the deorbit burn. The experimental capsule will perform a parachute-assisted splashdown off the coast of Japan, where a JAXA ship will be standing by for its recovery.

The HTV-7 spacecraft is scheduled to re-enter the Earth’s atmosphere and burn up harmlessly over the South Pacific Ocean Nov. 10.

Learn more about station activities by following @space_station and @ISS_Research on Twitter as well as the ISS Facebook and ISS Instagram accounts.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/07/astronauts-release-japanese-spaceship/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #97 on: 11/08/2018 04:50 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/07/2018

H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV)-7 Departure:  This morning, the crew finished closing out the Node 2 vestibule by demating all umbilicals and depressurizing the vestibule between HTV-7 and Node 2 in preparation for the unberth. Commands were sent to the release Common Berthing Mechanism (CBM) bolts prior to unberth.  Robotic Flight Controllers then maneuvered HTV-7 to the release position utilizing the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).  HTV-7 was subsequently released by the crew at 10:51 CT. Just after the HTV deorbit burn occurs on Saturday November 10, the HTV Small Re-entry Capsule (HSRC) will deploy from HTV with an intended splashdown southwest of Japan occurring at 4:06PM CT. The HSRC with JAXA Low Temperature Protein Crystal Growth (LT PCG) samples inside will then be retrieved and returned to Japan. The HSRC measures 840mm in diameter, 190kg in weight, and contains roughly 30L pressurized volume for sample return.

Veggie:  The crew placed markings on the watering syringes in preparation for future plant watering. Veggie-03 plants were checked for growth progression and watered as necessary. Photos were taken and placed on a flash card for downlink to the ground. The Vegetable Production System (Veggie) is a deployable plant growth unit capable of producing salad-type crops to provide the crew with a palatable, nutritious, and safe source of fresh food and a tool to support relaxation and recreation.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  BEST experiment operations part 3 were completed today to demonstrate direct ribonucleic acid (RNA) sequencing with the MinION miniature deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequencer using the sample kit retrieved from MELFI 1. The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Plasma Kristall-4:  The crew performed particle trapping activities using the Argon Gas line. Experiment was initiated via the European Physiology Module (EPM) laptop. Plasma Krystall-4 (PK-4) is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Mobile Servicing System (MSS) Operations: Robotics Ground Controllers powered up the MSS in the Hot Backup Configuration and unberthed HTV-7 from the Node 2 Nadir Active Common Berthing Mechanism (ACBM) using the Space Station Remote Manipulator System (SSRMS).  They then maneuvered HTV-7 to the release. After HTV-7 departure, Controllers maneuvered the SSRMS to a park position, de-configured the MSS from Hot Backup and supported a video survey of the Node 2 Nadir ACBM.  Once the survey was complete, the MSS was powered down.

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #98 on: 11/08/2018 07:43 PM »
U.S., Russian Spaceships Line Up for Launch After Japanese Vessel Departs

Mark Garcia Posted on November 8, 2018

The Expedition 57 crew said farewell to a Japanese resupply ship Wednesday and is getting ready to welcome U.S. and Russian space freighters in less than two weeks. The trio first practiced International Space Station emergency procedures today then went on to space research and robotics training.

The U.S. company Northrop Grumman is getting its 10th Cygnus cargo craft packed and ready for launch atop an Antares rocket Nov. 15 at 4:49 a.m. EST. Russia will launch its 71st station resupply mission aboard a Progress spaceship the next day at 1:14 p.m.

Both resupply ships are due to arrive at the station Sunday Nov. 18 just 10 hours apart. The Cygnus will get there first following its head start. Commander Alexander Gerst assisted by Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor will capture the American vessel with the Canadarm2 robotic arm at 4:35 a.m. A few hours later, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev will monitor the approach and automated docking of the Russian Progress 71 cargo craft to the Zvezda service module at 2:30 p.m.

All three crew members called down to mission controls centers in Houston and Moscow for a coordinated emergency drill today. The orbital residents practiced communication and decision-making skills while maneuvering along evacuation paths and locating safety gear.

Afterward, Gerst and Serena partnered up and reviewed next Sunday’s Cygnus approach and rendezvous procedures. Gerst will command the Canadarm2 to reach out and grapple Cygnus as Serena monitors the spaceship’s telemetry and data.

Prokopyev continued his science and maintenance duties in the orbital lab’s Russian segment. The cosmonaut explored the physics of plasma-dust crystals then conducted an eye exam in conjunction with doctors on Earth. Prokopyev also photographed the inside of the Zvezda and stowed radiation detectors.

https://blogs.nasa.gov/spacestation/2018/11/08/u-s-russian-spaceships-line-up-for-launch-after-japanese-vessel-departs/

Offline Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #99 on: 11/09/2018 09:01 PM »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 11/08/2018

Meteor: The crew removed and replaced the hard drive in the Meteor laptop and completed a software anti-virus update. The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Plasma Kristall-4 (PK-4): The crew exchanged the hard drive containing Run #2 data and inserted a new hard drive for Run #3. The crew then reconfigured the gas chamber from Neon to Argon gas usage. PK-4 is a scientific collaboration between the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), performing research in the field of “Complex Plasmas”: low temperature gaseous mixtures composed of ionized gas, neutral gas, and micron-sized particles. The micro-particles become highly charged in the plasma and interact strongly with each other, which can lead to a self-organized structure of the micro-particles: so-called plasma crystals. Experiments in the facility aim to study Transport Properties, Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Statistical Physics, and Non-linear waves and Instabilities in the plasmas.

Onboard Training (OBT) ISS Emergency Simulation:  The full crew participated in a simulation to practice emergency responses based on information provided by simulator displays. They translated through ISS to appropriate response locations and practiced procedure execution and decision making based on cues from the simulator. Following the training, they conducted a review session with Houston and Moscow Control Centers.

Northrop Grumman-10 (NG-10) Cygnus Rendezvous On-board Training (OBT):  The crew reviewed the NG-10 mission profile, rendezvous crew procedures, and interfaces necessary for monitoring and commanding to the Cygnus vehicle.  NG-10 is scheduled to arrive at the ISS on November 18.

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