Author Topic: Expedition 57 Thread  (Read 34324 times)

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #60 on: 10/19/2018 02:03 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/18/2018

Food Acceptability: An ISS crewmember performed the Questionnaire. The Food Acceptability investigation seeks to determine the impact of repetitive consumption of food currently available from the spaceflight food system.  Results will be used in developing strategies to improve food system composition to support crew health and performance on long duration missions

Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR): The ISS crew swapped out CIR Manifold #4 (1-letre) Bottles. One bottle contains 100% C2H4 and the other contains 40% CH4. The CIR includes an optics bench, combustion chamber, fuel and oxidizer control, and five different cameras for performing combustion experiments in microgravity.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Tether Slosh: Crew performed test runs of the SPHERES Tether Slosh test points. SPHERES Tether Slosh combines fluid dynamics equipment with robotic capabilities aboard the ISS to investigate automated strategies for steering passive cargo that contain fluids. In space, the fluid fuels used by spacecraft can slosh around in unpredictable ways making space maneuvers difficult. This investigation uses two SPHERES robots tethered to a fluid-filled container covered in sensors to test strategies for safely steering spacecraft such as dead satellites that might still have fuel in the tank

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #61 on: 10/19/2018 02:06 pm »
Liquid and Flame Science Work amid Japanese, Russian Maintenance

Mark Garcia Posted on October 18, 2018

Two Expedition 57 astronauts are working to understand what happens to fluids being transported by spacecraft today. Another crew member also worked on combustion science gear as well as Japanese and Russian systems.

Fluid physics and combustion research on the International Space Station helps scientists understand how well-known phenomena on Earth behaves in microgravity. For instance, fluids sloshing around inside fuel tanks can impact how a spaceship steers in space. The way flames burn and create soot in space can also create safety issues for crews.

Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) explored how fluids affect spacecraft maneuvers today. The duo set up a pair of tiny mobile satellites known as SPHERES for the test inside Japan’s Kibo lab module. The SPHERES Tether Slosh experiment is observing what happens when the satellites tow a liquid-filled tank versus a solid mass body with a Kevlar tether.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos opened up the Combustion Integrated Rack in the afternoon and replaced manifold bottles that contain gases for flame experiments. The flight engineer also packed items for disposal on a Japanese cargo ship and checked on Russian ventilation and air conditioning systems.

Offline rdale

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #62 on: 10/19/2018 11:10 pm »
Can someone translate the fire mask issues into English? http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-10-19-Fri-1445_trim.mp3

Offline Life_Support_32

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #63 on: 10/20/2018 10:28 am »
Can someone translate the fire mask issues into English? http://issaudio.byethost7.com/iss/2018-10-19-Fri-1445_trim.mp3
There are cartridges that are attached to emergency masks that scrub out constituents from fire. One of the ground ones from the same lot failed testing, so they are now no-go for use in a fire.

Crew will now have to use oxygen masks for fire response, which is normally less desirable because you are introducing oxygen near where the fire is. Crew will need training on this new philosophy including how to safely re-activate and use the hardline O2 system.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G890A using Tapatalk


Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #64 on: 10/22/2018 04:44 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/19/2018

Plant Habitat:  Plant Habitat activities were performed today to measure chlorophyll fluorescence parameters of growing plants and provided photos to the ground. Plant Habitat is a fully automated facility that will be used to conduct plant bioscience research on the ISS. The space environment is stressful for all living organisms. Understanding how plants respond will help crews on future missions successfully grow plants for food and oxygen generation. The Plant Habitat-1 investigation compares differences in genetics, metabolism, photosynthesis, and gravity sensing between plants grown in space and on Earth.  This investigation is expected to provide key insights on major changes occurring in plants exposed to microgravity.

Life Support Rack (LSR):  Power and data umbilical cables, as well as fluid and waste gas umbilicals were mated in preparation for LSR activation in November.  LSR is a European Space Agency technology demonstrator for closed loop air revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR operates for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions

NanoRacks Platform:  Platforms 1 and 2 were relocated from Express Rack 4 to the new Express Rack 10B. Cables were re-mated and the Platforms were powered up. NanoRacks Platforms is a multipurpose research facility on board the ISS. NanoRacks Platforms supports NanoRacks Modules in the CubeSat form factor by providing power and data transfer capabilities to operate investigations in microgravity.

POSSUM (Payload On-orbit Still Shorts for Utilization and Maintenance) Payload Photo:  The crew took high quality still photos of ISS rack locations in the USOS Lab, Columbus, and JEM modules for use on the ground to train astronauts with ISS topography. The POSSUM photo project is a training tool that has the ISS crew take onboard photographs of completed Express rack and experiment installations. These photos are sent to the ground and printed into actual life size marquees that are used for ISS astronaut training and familiarization.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging:  Today the crew terminated an Autocycle for two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB) and initiated the Autocycle on two additional batteries. Today’s initiated Autocycle will be terminated on October 23, leaving all 4 LLBs in a nominal, discharged state. Over the course of three days, the auto cycle will capture battery health data and help ground experts understand the charge and discharge capacities of these new and improved LLBs. The data will also be used to compare charging system performance between the on-orbit and ground based systems.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #65 on: 10/22/2018 08:00 pm »
Genetics, Vision and Earth Studies Aboard Station Today

Mark Garcia Posted on October 22, 2018

Three Expedition 57 crew members are orbiting Earth today researching RNA sequencing and eye health aboard the International Space Station. The trio from the U.S., Germany and Russia also replaced combustion research hardware and activated Earth observation gear.

Flight Engineer Serena Auñón-Chancellor from NASA is helping scientists identify microbes and understand how their genetics change in space. She extracted and processed microbial samples today from swabbed station surfaces for later genetic sequencing using specialized hardware. Results will also help researchers observe how life adapts to the weightlessness of microgravity.

Auñón-Chancellor then observed and photographed samples for a protein crystal study to help doctors improve the development of disease-treating drugs. She then joined Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency) for eye scans with an ultrasound device to learn how long-term missions affect vision.

Gerst started his day in the U.S. Destiny lab module replacing hardware inside the Combustion Integrated Rack that enables gas and flame studies. He later wrapped up the workday photographing how quartz and clay particles sediment in space.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked inside the Unity module setting up Earth photography gear for the long-running EarthKAM experiment. The study enables school students to remotely operate the station digital camera to photograph and download imagery of Earth landmarks such as coastlines and mountains.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #66 on: 10/23/2018 04:26 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/22/2018

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  The ISS crew began a BEST experiment 1 session.  The goal of experiment 1 is to identify bacteria directly from ISS surfaces through the swabbing and subsequent extraction of DNA from the swab using miniPCR.  The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

BioServe Protein Crystallography (BPC)-1:  In today’s phase 2 final operations session, the crew removed the BioServe Protein Crystallography samples from SABL, then observed and photographed the sample wells using the microscope.  Well-defined crystals were present in many of the observed wells.  BPC-1 seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of conducting protein crystal growth in real time onboard the ISS. Crewmembers add solutions to the hardware, observe the crystals that form, and adjust for follow-on experiments. This approach gives scientists the ability to optimize crystal growth in microgravity instead of waiting for samples to return and then launching them again.

Combustion Integration Rack (CIR) / Advanced Combustion via Microgravity Experiments (ACME) / Electric-Field Effects on Laminar Diffusion (E-FIELD) Flames Hardware Replacement:  Today the crew removed the negative power supply and installed the positive power supply in support of the continuing E-Field Flames part 2 investigation.  For E-Field Flames an electric field with voltages as high as 10,000 volts is established between the burner and a mesh electrode. The motion of the charged ions, which are naturally produced within the flame, are strongly affected by a high-voltage electric field. The resulting ion-driven wind can dramatically influence the stability and sooting behavior of the flame. Conducting the tests in microgravity allows for great simplifications in the analysis, enabling new understanding and the development of less polluting and more efficient combustion technology for use on Earth.

Loop Heat Pipe Radiator (LHPR):  The checkout of the external LHPR investigation was initiated via ground commanding this morning.  The LHPR, is an advanced two-phase heat transfer device that utilizes the evaporation and condensation of a working fluid to transfer heat, and the capillary force to circulate the fluid. This investigation demonstrates the heat transfer performance/functions under microgravity conditions using the LHPR experimental apparatus, which is grappled by the JEM Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS). This technology can be applied in the thermal control system of future satellites that generate large amounts of heat that could negatively affect satellite operations.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKam) Set Up: The crew set up the EarthKAM hardware in Node in preparation for the start of Mission 64.  As of today, over 19,000 students from 34 countries have signed up to participate.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Common Communications for Visiting Vehicle (C2V2) Radio Frequency (RF) Demonstration:  Ground Teams are implementing their fourth and final on-orbit C2V2 demonstration while flying over the Electronic System Test Laboratory (ESTL). These demonstrations are intended to verify end-to-end functionality of all C2V2 capabilities following the Revision 2 (R2) Software transition, which occurred this past March.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #67 on: 10/23/2018 07:41 pm »
Station Preps for Japan, US Ship Operations Next Month

Mark Garcia Posted on October 23, 2018

The International Space Station is getting ready for Japanese and U.S. cargo ship operations next month. In the meantime, the three residents onboard the orbital lab today configured science hardware and checked out safety gear.

Serena Auñón-Chancellor from NASA worked in the Japanese Kibo laboratory today replacing gear inside a Multi-Purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR). The MSPR provides a workspace that supplies power and video enabling research into a variety of smaller experiments. She spent the majority of the day working on video cable connections and swapping out a computer in the MSPR.

She and Commander Commander Alexander Gerst started Tuesday practicing wearing and using breathing gear connected to an oxygen port in the event of a space emergency. Gerst then helped out with the MSPR work before the duo moved on to packing Japan’s HTV-7 resupply ship.

Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked out on a treadmill today to help Russian scientists understand how the human body is impacted by exercise in microgravity. He then spent the afternoon on computer and life support maintenance.

The packed HTV-7 is due to be removed from the Harmony module with the Canadarm2 and released back into Earth orbit in November. Its release will cap a 47 day stay at the station but the vehicle has one more mission before its fiery destruction over the Pacific Ocean. The HTV-7 will release a small reentry capsule for recovery in the Pacific Ocean by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The recovery mission is a test of the Japanese space agency’s ability to retrieve experiment samples safely and quickly from the station.

An American cargo ship is due to replenish the Expedition 57 crew a few days after the HTV-7 leaves. Northrup Grumman’s Cygnus space freighter will take a three-day trip in space before it is captured with the Canadarm2 and berthed to the Unity module. Cygnus will stay attached to the station for 86 days of cargo operations.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #68 on: 10/24/2018 02:27 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/23/2018

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC / DC Converter Unit (DCU) Replacement Part 1:  The crew replaced MSPR DCU with and upgraded DCU2. The still functional older unit will be kept onboard as a spare. The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. It has two workspaces and a work table that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM):  Mission 64 is continuing nominally.  As of today, the number participating has increased to just over 20,000 students from 35 countries.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Wireless Communication and Positioning Experiment (WICO):  The crew copied WICO data from the SD Card to a Station Support Computer (SSC) for subsequent downlink.  WICO demonstrates a wireless network for the efficient readout of sensors, as well as the localization of moving objects within the Columbus module. The experiment is based on the impulse radio – ultra-wideband (IR-UWB), which extends the capabilities of a recently performed Wireless Sensor Network (WSN) demonstration using Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) bands at 2.45 GHz. The evaluation of WICO helps to analyze potential uses of WSN for unmanned and manned spaceflight missions, and to derive obstacles and limitations for the operations under very specific conditions due to the complex electromagnetic environment.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)7 Cargo Transfer:  The crew continued HTV7 cargo transfer operations today. Ground specialists estimate approximately 1 hour remains to complete transfer.

Portable Breathing Apparatus (PBA) Hardline O2 Demonstration:  Today, the crew practiced demonstrating the connection of a PBA via an extension hose to a low pressure O2 port and donning the mask. This training serves as a refresher on the usage of PBA hardware and hardline O2 in response to a U.S. Segment Fire.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Li-Ion Battery Data Logging:  Today the crew terminated an Autocycle session, which was initiated this past Friday for two EMU Long Life Batteries (LLB). Today’s activity leaves the LLBs in a nominal, discharged state. Over the course of three days, the auto cycle captures battery health data and helps ground experts understand the charge and discharge capacities of these new and improved LLBs. The data will also be used to compare charging system performance between the on-orbit and ground based systems.

Port Solar Alpha Rotary Joint (PSARJ) Current Draw:  The port SARJ drive current has shown an increasing trend for the past several days, although it is still well below maximum limits. The current draw for String 2 Drive Lock Assembly (DLA) for the PSARJ is generally ~0.15 amps and increases to ~0.17 amps during high negative solar beta. Solar beta peaked at -62 degrees on October 21 and is decreasing in magnitude. Currently the solar beta angle is at -58 degrees and the PSARJ current draw is ~0.3 amps. The DLA trip point is 1.3 amps. There is no on orbit action required at this time. However, ground teams are studying the signature and may recommend a DLA string swap if the current does not drop when the solar beta decreases. The PSARJ was lubricated in 2011 and the lubricant is expected to last at least 15 years.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #69 on: 10/25/2018 02:34 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/24/2018
 


Fluids Integrated Rack (FIR) / Light Microscopy Module (LMM) / Biophysics-4:  Following an overall successful conclusion of the Biophysics-4 experiment run, the Biophysics-4 plate was removed from the LMM and stowed.  The Biophysics-4 experiment contained proteins with both a fast and slow evolutionary period, which were observed by the ground teams.  Proteins are important biological molecules that can be crystallized to provide better views of their structure, which helps scientists understand how they work. Proteins crystallized in microgravity are often higher in quality than those grown on Earth. The Effect of Macromolecular Transport on Microgravity Protein Crystallization (LMM Biophysics 4) studies why this is the case, examining the movement of single protein molecules in microgravity.

Meteor Troubleshooting:  As a continuation of the Meteor troubleshooting, the crew opened the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), replaced the faulty inverter, and configured the diffraction grating to support operations.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC/DC converter unit 2 (DCU2) and Video Compression And Recording Unit 2 (VRU2) R&R:  Today the crew performed the MSPR DCU2 Cable connection and Closeout. They also replaced the MSPR VRU with an upgraded VRU2 unit.  The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM. The MSPR has two workspaces and a work table that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization including science and educational missions.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM) Set Up: Today the 50mm camera lens was exchanged for an 85mm camera lens for the on-going EarthKAM mission 64.  EarthKAM is expected to continue this mission through Tuesday, October 30.  As of today, over 20,000 students from 37 countries are participating and 2,069 images have been downlinked.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Crew Quarters (CQ) Clean:  A USOS crewmember cleaned the Deck CQ today.  During this activity, the crew cleaned behind panels, intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors as required.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #70 on: 10/25/2018 04:32 pm »
Plant Science and Solar Array Photos as Station Nears Milestone

Mark Garcia Posted on October 25, 2018

Botany science and solar array photography were on the Expedition 57 crew’s schedule today including ongoing maintenance of the orbital lab. The research and photo surveys help scientists and engineers understand how life and International Space Station systems adapt to microgravity.

Astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor is helping NASA and its international partners understand how plants grow in microgravity to promote humans living longer and farther in space. She set up the Veggie plant growth facility today to grow a variety of edible plants such as kale and lettuce inside Europe’s Columbus lab module. Botanists are also exploring how cultivating plants to provide a fresh food supply affects crew morale.

Commander Alexander Gerst started his day familiarizing himself with the botany experiment. The German astronaut from of ESA (European Space Agency) then worked throughout the day photo-documenting the station’s port side solar arrays. The photos will be downloaded so ground specialists can inspect the condition of the arrays for damage sites.

On the Russian side of the space lab, cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev checked on power supply systems inside the Zarya cargo module before moving on to science and life support work. Zarya was the first station module launched into space and will reach its 20th anniversary on Nov. 20.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #71 on: 10/26/2018 02:07 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/25/2018

Veg-03G:  Today, the crew installed a Root Mat and Plant Pillows, then powered up Veg-03G and set light intervals.  They then filled the Plant Pillows and Root Mat with water in order to initiate the Veg-03G experiment.  This is the first day of a 28 day growth cycle for the Red Russian Kale and Dragoon Lettuce plants. The primary goal of the Veg-03G testing is to demonstrate plant growth in the Veggie hardware using leafy green vegetables as test crops, benefitting future long-duration space missions which will require crew members to grow their own food.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM):  EarthKAM mission 64 is continuing nominally.  As of this report, 242 schools representing 20,445 students and 37 countries have signed up to request images.  17,360 image requests have been submitted, 3,437 images have been downlinked, and 2,879 images have been posted to the web.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Multi-purpose Small Payload Rack (MSPR) DC/DC Converter Unit 2 (DCU2):  The ground has detected an issue with the assembly of DCU2 on MSPR2.  The checkout scheduled for tomorrow, October 26, will be cancelled and the ground teams are considering a forward plan.  The MSPR is a multipurpose payload rack system used in the JEM equipped with two workspaces and a worktable that can be used for wide fields of space environment utilization, including science and educational missions.

Crew Quarters (CQ) Clean:  A USOS crewmember cleaned the Overhead CQ today. During this activity, the crew cleaned behind panels, intake and exhaust ducts, fans and airflow sensors as required.

Port Solar Array Imagery:  The crew obtained photographs of all four Port Solar Array mast structures and blankets.  These images will provide data that can be compared to baseline imagery to obtain a better understanding of the current physical condition of the arrays and the potential rates that structural degradation of the mast occurs due to Micro Meteor Orbital Debris (MMOD) damage.

HII Transfer Vehicle (HTV)7 Cargo Transfer:  Today, the crew completed loading of all currently available cargo items. Any remaining trash to be loaded will consist of common trash and KTOs which will be loaded as they become available.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #72 on: 10/26/2018 08:06 pm »
Spacesuits and High-Temp, Fire Science Focus of Crew Today

Mark Garcia Posted on October 26, 2018

U.S. spacesuits and hot, fiery research kept the Expedition 57 crew busy Friday. The three-member crew from around the world also continued the ongoing upkeep of the International Space Station’s systems.

A pair of spacesuits inside the Quest airlock had their cooling loops scrubbed today by station Commander Alexander Gerst of ESA (European Space Agency). The suit maintenance comes ahead of a pair of spacewalks being planned to connect new lithium-ion batteries on the space station’s port truss structure.

Fellow flight engineers Serena Auñón-Chancellor of NASA and Sergey Prokopyev of Roscosmos worked on advanced science hardware. The two devices, the Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF) and the Combustion Integrated Rack (CIR), enable the safe research of high temperatures, flames and gases.

Auñón-Chancellor cleaned up the ELF inside the Kibo lab module after removing samples exposed to extremely high temperatures. Scientists are observing how microgravity affects the thermophysical properties of a variety materials at different temperatures.

Prokopyev worked in the Destiny lab module replacing fuel bottles for experiments inside the CIR researching how fuels and flames burn in space. Results may guide the development of rocket engines and fire safety aboard spacecraft.


Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #73 on: 10/27/2018 12:24 pm »

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #74 on: 10/29/2018 01:49 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/26/2018

Echo External Hard Disk Connection: The crew connected the Echo External Hard Disk and USB Cable to SSC 11 in preparation for a file update and subsequent Echo software update.  The purpose of the investigation is to evaluate a tele-operated ultrasound system equipped with motorized probes that are controlled by ground controllers. Additionally, this investigation serves to perform the commissioning of the Echo instrument which is planned for use during future Vascular Echo experiment.

Electro-static Levitation Furnace (ELF): The crew extracted the sample cartridge from the ELF, removed the lost sample from ELF cartridge chamber, and reassembled the ELF. ELF is an experimental facility designed to levitate, melt and solidify materials by containerless processing techniques using the electrostatic levitation method.  With this facility thermophysical properties of high temperature melts can be measured and solidification from deeply undercooled melts can be achieved.

Sally Ride Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle Schools (EarthKAM): EarthKAM mission 64 is continuing nominally.  A total of 21,753 students from 38 countries are now signed up and 4,984 images have been downlinked.  EarthKAM allows thousands of students to photograph and examine Earth from a space crew’s perspective. Using the Internet, the students control a special digital camera mounted on-board the ISS. This enables them to photograph the Earth’s coastlines, mountain ranges and other geographic items of interest from the unique vantage point of space. The EarthKAM team then posts these photographs on the Internet for viewing by the public and participating classrooms around the world.

Wireless Communication and Positioning Experiment (Wireless Compose or WiCo): The crew reconfigured the WiCo Motes (sensor packages) to energy harvesting mode.  One of the three objectives of the WiCo experiment is to demonstrate energy harvesting as a viable method to achieve a maintenance-free sensing system for ISS and future scenarios.  WiCo demonstrates a wireless network for the efficient readout of sensors, as well as the localization of moving objects within the Columbus module of the ISS. The experiment is based on the impulse radio – ultra-wideband (IR-UWB), which extends the capabilities of a recently performed wireless sensor network (WSN) demonstration using Industrial, Scientific, and Medical (ISM) bands at 2.45 GHz. The evaluation of Wireless Compose helps to analyze potential uses of WSN for unmanned and manned spaceflight missions, and to derive obstacles and limitations for the operations under very specific conditions due to the complex electromagnetic environment.

Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) Water Operations: The crew completed a half dump and fill on EMUs 3004 and 3006 followed by scrubbing and iodination of the suits.

Temperature and Humidity Control (THC) Intermodule Ventilation (IMV) Flow Measurement Survey: Using the Velocicalc tool, the crew took measurements of selected USOS ventilation inlets and outlets as part of system health monitoring. These readings are taken approximately every 4 months.

Offline eeergo

Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #75 on: 10/29/2018 02:14 pm »

New flyaround high-resolution pictures from MS-08's departure in Roskosmos' Flickr:


https://www.flickr.com/photos/roscosmos/45616596621/in/album-72157699714664812/

Note BEAM in what I believe is the first wide context picture since its installation, the antenna of the recently installed Icarus experiment on Zvezda, or NICER in its unstowed position.
-DaviD-

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #76 on: 10/29/2018 02:47 pm »
New desktop background!!
Jack
Twitter: wjackbarnett

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #77 on: 10/29/2018 07:07 pm »
Crew Studies How Space Impacts Brain and Perception

Mark Garcia Posted on October 29, 2018

A pair of Expedition 57 astronauts spent the day exploring how humans think and work while living long-term in space. A cosmonaut also tested a pair of tiny, free-floating satellites operating inside the International Space Station.

NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor is helping doctors on the ground understand if an astronaut’s brain structure and mental abilities change in space. She took part in a behavioral assessment test today that involves the mental imaging of rotating objects, target accuracy during motion or stillness and concentrating on two tasks at the same time. The NeuroMapping experiment, which has been ongoing since 2014, is exploring an astronaut’s neuro-cognitive abilities before, during and after a spaceflight.

Scientists are also learning how an astronaut’s nervous system may be impacted by different gravitational environments such as the moon, asteroids or planets. The GRIP study from ESA (European Space Agency) is exploring how space residents interact with objects by monitoring their grip and load forces.

Commander Alexander Gerst from Germany strapped himself into a specialized seat in the Columbus lab module for the GRIP study today. He performed several motions in the seat while gripping a device collecting data measuring cognition, grip force and movement kinematics.

Cosmonaut Sergey Prokopyev set up the bowling ball-sized SPHERES satellites for a test run inside Japan’s Kibo lab module. The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) are used for a variety of experiments including autonomous formation-flying, shipping liquids such as fuels and introducing students to spacecraft navigation techniques.

Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #78 on: 10/30/2018 01:51 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/29/2018

Actiwatch Spectrum:  Following the discovery of some bad data from a previous Actiwatch spectrum data collection, this activity set up the nine remaining Actiwatch spectrum units to verify they are producing good data. The Actiwatch Spectrum is a waterproof, nonintrusive, sleep-wake monitor worn on a crewmember’s wrist. The device contains an accelerometer for measuring motion and color sensitive photodiodes (a photodetector capable of converting light into voltage) for monitoring ambient lighting. Together, these capabilities enable the Actiwatch Spectrum to analyze circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, and activity.

Grip Seated Science Session:  The crew completed the Grip seated session which is the first of three Grip activities for the week.  Pending verification of the downlinked data, the ground reported the session went well.  ESA’s Grip investigation tests how the nervous system takes into account the forces due to gravity and inertia when manipulating objects.  Results from this investigation may provide insight into potential hazards for astronauts as they manipulate objects in different gravitational environments, support design and control of haptic interfaces to be used in challenging environments such as space, and provide information about motor control that will be useful for the evaluation and rehabilitation of impaired upper limb control in patients with neurological diseases.

Spaceflight Effects on Neurocognitive Performance: Extent, Longevity, and Neural Bases (Neuromapping):  The crew performed a NeuroMapping Experiment Neurocognitive Test which includes testing in both “strapped in” and “free floating” body configurations. The investigation studies whether long-duration spaceflight causes changes to brain structure and function, motor control, and multi-tasking abilities. It also measures how long it takes for the brain and body to recover from possible changes. Previous research and anecdotal evidence from astronauts suggests movement control and cognition can be affected in microgravity. The NeuroMapping investigation includes use of structural and functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (MRI and fMRI) to assess any changes that occur after spending months on the ISS.

Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) Zero Robotics Unit Test:  As part of the 2018 High School Tournament, the crew performed a unit test today.  The unit test occurs prior to the actual competition and allows the ground to verify various aspects of the competition are working as intended.  When the actual completion is performed in January, the High School Tournament teams will be tasked with dodging virtual space debris in low Earth orbit to retrieve a damaged SPHERES satellite.  The SPHERES-Zero-Robotics investigation establishes an opportunity for high school students to design research for the ISS. As part of a competition, students write algorithms for the SPHERES satellites to accomplish tasks relevant to future space missions. The algorithms are tested by the SPHERES team and the best designs are selected for the competition to operate the SPHERES satellites on board the ISS.

Nitrogen/Oxygen Recharge System (NORS) Nitrogen (N2) Transfer Initiation: The crew reconfigured the ISS N2 System and initiated the N2 transfer from the NORS tank to the ISS High Pressure Gas Tank. This NORS N2 tank will be left installed until the N2 is depleted, which is expected in approximately one month.

Lab Waste Water Bus Reconfiguration: Today, the crew attempted to reconfigure the waster bus for the upcoming commissioning and use of the newly installed Life Support Rack (LSR).  The crew noticed when demating the Node 1 to LAB waste water line that the male side of the Quick Disconnects (QD) poppet was off nominal and still depressed. The crew took photos for ground assessment and remated the connector.  LSR commissioning is currently scheduled for November 6.

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #79 on: 10/31/2018 10:41 am »
Happy Halloween

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