Author Topic: Expedition 57 Thread  (Read 35106 times)

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #20 on: 02/15/2018 08:55 pm »
Quote
Alexander Gerst @Astro_Alex
Wenn man als Astronaut seinen Missionsnamen auf einem Kuchen lesen kann, ist das ein recht gutes Zeichen. —
If as a astronaut you can read your mission name on a cake, that’s typically a good sign.

https://twitter.com/Astro_Alex/status/964252175181299712
---
SMS ;-).

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #21 on: 04/19/2018 06:51 pm »

It's German and English mixed through each other. (European style  ;))
« Last Edit: 04/19/2018 06:52 pm by Rik ISS-fan »

Offline Moonbase_Alphan

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #22 on: 05/01/2018 01:17 am »
Updated version
« Last Edit: 05/01/2018 10:05 am by jacqmans »

Online FutureSpaceTourist

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #23 on: 05/07/2018 08:08 am »


Quote
Published on 7 May 2018 ‘Horizons’ is the name of ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst’s second mission to the International Space Station.
The mission name evokes exploring our Universe, looking far beyond our planet and broadening our knowledge. Alexander would also like to make people realise that there is always a chance to go beyond their personal horizons.
Alexander will be launched on 6 June with US astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev from the Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan in the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft.
Alexander will take over command of the International Space Station for the second half of his mission. Alexander Gerst is the 11th German citizen to fly into space.
The astronaut is now in the last stages of training for his challenging spaceflight. The science programme is packed with European research: more than 50 experiments will deliver benefits to people back on Earth and prepare for future space exploration.
Credits: ESA

Offline Olaf

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #24 on: 05/09/2018 07:19 am »
https://twitter.com/LiNa8294/status/994056373116817408
Quote
The official portrait of the Expedition 57 crewmembers @AstroSerena, Aleksey Ovchinin, @Astro_Alex, @AstroHague & Sergei Prokopev.

Offline Joachim

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #25 on: 05/09/2018 08:00 am »

Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #26 on: 06/04/2018 06:22 pm »
from: https://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/schedule.html

Quote
June 18, Monday
2 p.m. – ISS Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference with Nick Hague and Alexey Ovchinin (All Channels)
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #27 on: 06/19/2018 06:40 pm »
Expedition 57-58 Crew News Conference - June 18, 2018

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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #28 on: 06/23/2018 10:42 pm »
https://twitter.com/AFSpace/status/1010160703393673218

Quote
[email protected] discussed his upcoming trip to the @Space_Station during a news conference at the @NASA Johnson Space Center in Houston on June 18. Read more about the press conference and his upcoming mission here: https://go.usa.gov/xQhu9

http://www.afspc.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1555806/hague-ovchinin-talk-iss-mission-during-presser/

Quote
Hague, Ovchinin talk ISS mission during presser

By Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann, Air Forces Cyber Public Affairs / Published June 20, 2018

Surrounded by media representatives and audience members, Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, discussed their upcoming trip to space during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. The two will journey to the International Space Station on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

 JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas --

Surrounded by media representatives and audience members, Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, discussed their upcoming trip to space during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018.

The two will journey to the International Space Station on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Their six-month mission serves one purpose.

“We are up there … to do science,” said Hague in a Twitter-Chat hosted after the news conference. “Some of that I am simply performing, and some of that I am the test subject. But we are up there to ask questions and collect data so the scientists on the ground can answer those questions.”

Those questions, in the form of more than 300 experiments, are aimed at advancing science to benefit future deep-space travel.

“Some experiments will look at us and how we survive on orbit; what happens when you put a human up there for that long,” said Hague.

“Space is the only place we can perform research where people have long-term exposure to microgravity,” he continued. “We can see what happens when you take gravity out of the equation. There are things we’re trying to discover about how the body responds.”

The U.S. and Russian space travelers will join the rest of their Expedition 57 crew, already on the ISS. The first three crewmembers left earth June 6, 2018, aboard the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft, and arrived at the station June 8, 2018.

The team began training together more than a year ago.

“We trained a lot in Russia on the Russian segment of the International Space Station,” said Ovchinin. “We’ve also trained here in Houston on the U.S. segment of the station. But the biggest part of our training was on the Russian Soyuz vehicle in Russia.”

Additionally, Hague has trained nearly 150 hours in preparation for a possible space walk.

“The space walk that’s currently planned will help us improve the station’s capabilities,” said Hague. “We’ve been training a long time for it, and I’d love to put the training to some use.”

Hague, from Hoxie, Kansas, is the first astronaut from NASA’s 2013 astronaut class to fly to space. He is one of four active duty Air Force astronauts, beginning his training for space in 2013.  He earned a Master of Science degree in Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2000 and taught astronautics at the US Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado, from 2006-2009.

“It’s exciting. You work your whole life for something and when it’s there it’s hard to believe,” said Hague. “I just feel really lucky to be doing what I’m doing and to have the opportunity that I have.”

Hague credits his success to his family.  His parents, Don and Bev Hague, live in Gering, Nebraska.

“My biggest source of inspiration in pursuing this dream has been my parents,” said Hague. “They taught me the value of education and hard work, and gave me constant love and support that let me know I could be successful.

 Hague is married to Lt. Col. Catie Hague, who is also an Air Force officer. They have two sons. 

“My wife and boys are the motivation that keeps me going,” he added. “They make the hard seem less hard. This is all thanks to them.”

Hague and Ovchinin will return to earth April 15, 2019, as part of Expedition 58. Watch their live launch Oct. 11 on https://www.nasa.gov/nasalive.


Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, discusses his upcoming trip to the International Space Station, during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. Hague and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, and Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut, discuss their upcoming trip to the International Space Station, during a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018. The two will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)


Quote
JOHNSON SPACE CENTER, Texas -- Col. Nick Hague, NASA astronaut (second from left), poses with Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps cadets after a news conference at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, June 18, 2018, to discuss his upcoming trip to the International Space Station. Hague and Alexey Ovchinin, Russian Roscosmos cosmonaut, will journey to the ISS on Oct. 11, 2018, aboard the Roscosmos Soyuz MS-10 spacecraft, launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. R.J. Biermann)

Quote
Canadian Space Agency astronaut David Saint Jacques helps Astronaut Col. Tyler N. "Nick" Hague prepare to be lowered into a pool with a mockup of the International Space Station (ISS) for Extravehicular Activity (EVA) training at the Johnson Space Flight Center's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory (NBL) in Houston, Tex., Apr. 27, 2017. During training at NBL, Hague wears a spacesuit to simulate the near weightless environment he will encounter while performing EVAs, or spacewalks, while serving as a flight engineer on Expedition 54/55 aboard ISS in 2018-2019.
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #29 on: 07/13/2018 01:56 pm »
Expedition 57 crew poster (06/14/2018 - Final Draft 5 version):
« Last Edit: 07/15/2018 08:47 am by SMS »
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Offline SMS

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #30 on: 07/15/2018 08:50 am »
ISS Expedition 57 Final version:
« Last Edit: 07/16/2018 07:04 pm by SMS »
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Online Rondaz

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #31 on: 08/24/2018 03:24 pm »
The CPC. ISS-57/58 crew successfully passed the manual docking and re-docking exam

The Cosmonaut Training Center named after Yu. A. Gagarin has a unique simulator complex that allows cosmonauts and astronauts to be trained in the management of a manned transport vehicle at each stage of the flight, simulate abnormal and emergency situations in order to work out their parrying actions. On one of these specialized simulators Don-Soyuz today passed the exam for manual berthing and reconnecting of the TPK Soyuz MS, the ISS-57/58 crew, which includes Cosmonaut Roskosmos Alexei Ovchinin and NASA astronaut Nick Heig.
 
In the exam ticket - traditionally four modes. The first - redocking - is performed without any abnormal situations, since the mode itself immediately assumes manual control of the ship. Today, the crew pulled out a ticket with the option of re-docking, which is planned during the expedition to the International Space Station - from the MIM-2 module to the service module's service bay.
 
When the second mode was implemented, the mooring began with an abnormal situation in the on-board computer system, which the crew members quickly identified and switched to manual control in the analog circuit, docking was done in the shade. The complexity of the regime is that the crew must parry the separation, which is performed automatically after the failure of the computer system. For successful docking in the shade, the crew should approach the station at a distance of less than 80 meters - the range at which the ISS will be visible by the light of the ship's headlamp.
 
The third regime began with an automatic flight, then, after the instructor introduced an emergency situation - a collision accident - the crew switched to manual control in a discrete circuit. Alexey Ovchinin and Nick Haig responded quickly to an abnormal situation, confidently performed the flight manually and docked to the given node.
 
The fourth is a safety mode with a high speed of the ship and the introduction of such an abnormal situation as the failure of the on-board computer system. In this case, the crew's task is to switch to manual control in the analog circuit and ensure safe flight of the station, mooring and docking.
 
As a result of the examination, the commission noted the responsiveness of the astronaut and astronaut's response to the emerged contingencies, the competent execution of all modes in accordance with on-board documentation and the coordinated work of the commander and flight engineer who deservedly received excellent marks.

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #32 on: 10/03/2018 07:05 am »
Press release, 2 October 2018

Alexander Gerst assumes command of the ISS - On 3 October 2018, the German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility of the International Space Station

Alexander Gerst will undoubtedly never forget 3 October 2018 – on the 'Day of German Unity', the 42-year old geophysicist and astronaut will be the first German and second European to become Commander of the International Space Station (ISS). The ceremony
aboard the ISS will last from 04:10 to 16:30 CEST and be broadcast live on the Internet by NASA and ESA. NASA astronaut, Andrew 'Drew' Feustel, Commander of the current 'Expedition 56' crew will then officially hand over the 'top position' on the Space
Station to Alexander Gerst. The German ESA astronaut will assume overall responsibility for both the Expedition 57 crew and all modules of the Space Station, that is, the US, Russian, Japanese and European parts, until the end of his mission and return
to Earth – which will probably take place on 13 December.

"The transfer of overall responsibility for the crew and the ISS space station to the German ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is an enormous vote of confidence in the partnership between Europe and the other ISS nations, in particular the two founding
nations – the United States and Russia," says Pascale Ehrenfreund, Chair of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Executive Board.

"Germany is the strongest European partner of the ISS; we are the European leader in the use of the space station with about 40 percent." Passing on command to Alexander Gerst is therefore also a special recognition of the achievements in his two previous
ISS missions – 'Blue Dot' in 2014 and 'horizons' this year," adds Walther Pelzer, DLR Executive Board member responsible for the Space Administration and for the German contributions to the 'horizons' mission and ESA.

Gerst's crew will continue to be NASA astronaut Serena Aunon-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopjev – with whom @Astro_Alex set off to the ISS for his 'horizons' mission on 6 June 2018. From mid-October, they will be joined by NASA astronaut
Nick Hague and cosmonaut Alexey Ovchinin, who will take off for the space station in a Russian Soyuz capsule on 11 October.

Compared to an astronaut's 'normal' everyday life as a mission specialist, for example in the role of a flight engineer or scientist, being captain of the entire spaceship means "maintaining an overview especially in critical situations and making
informed decisions," explains Volker Schmid, 'horizons' Mission Manager and Head of the ISS Division at the DLR Space Administration in Bonn. Experience of procedures on board the ISS is just as important as being accepted by the crew. "The Captain
must be a team player more so than anyone else, while earning the respect and confidence to assume responsibility for the entire crew and ship, even in a crisis," says Schmid. The Commander also works extremely closely with the Flight Director and
mission team on the ground to ensure a successful overall mission. Alexander Gerst is also responsible for safety, the health of the crew and the protection of the ISS modules. In an emergency, he will be the one who makes decisions regarding rescue
measures, including aborting the mission or returning to Earth prematurely.

Offline Rik ISS-fan

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #33 on: 10/03/2018 10:20 pm »
After the change off command ceremony, the ISS operations discussion moves to this topic right.
Thus I've moved part of a post to this topic.

Most likely the ISPR rack transfers for HTV-7 have been completed yesterday when the 3th RSR was placed inside HTV-7. Now comes the commissioning activities for the new racks. AFAIK this work is already in progress for the Basic Express Racks (ER-9B & ER-10B) and LSR (ACLS).

After the ISPR rack transfers and the activation of the Basic Express Racks. I expect a lot of experiment locker relocations. My expectation is that the Nanoracks lockers will be transferd from ER-4 (JPM F6) to ER-10B (JPM A5). I also expect that both TangoLabs will be relocated to a BER.
The Rodent Habitat Lockers and DEXA will most likely be transferred from ER-1 or ER-2 (LAB Overhead 1&2) to ER-4. This will happen after LSG (Live Science Glovebox) installation and commissioning. This will create a very nice Rodent research facility comprised of ER-4, LSG and MELFI.
Most likely several new research equipment lockers will arrive on coming commercial resupply missions. So the HTV-7 might lead to a increase in the scientific utilization of the ISS, because more experiments can be hosted at the same time.

Offline centaurinasa

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #34 on: 10/04/2018 12:46 pm »
ISS config., after Soyuz MS-08 departure and before Soyuz MS-10 arrival...

Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #35 on: 10/04/2018 03:36 pm »
ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/03/2018

54S Undocking:  The ISS crew has sleep shifted to accommodate 54S undock/landing tomorrow at 02:56/06:45 CT respectively.  The crew is scheduled to wake up at 4:30 pm tonight to complete final undock preparations.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST):  The crew began a 48hr BEST experiment 3 copy-DNA (cDNA) session.  The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Functional Immune: The crew will perform saliva and blood collection activities as part of the Functional Immune experiment.  Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

JEM Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (J-SSOD)-10: The crew performed part 2 of 2 of the J-SSOD installation onto the Multi-Purpose Experiment Platform (MPEP).  This is being performed in preparation for the J-SSOD-10 deploys this Saturday, GMT 279.  The J-SSOD is a unique satellite launcher, handled by the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS), which provides containment and deployment mechanisms for several individual small satellites. Once the J-SSOD is installed on the MPEP by crewmembers, it is passed through the JEM airlock for retrieval, positioning and deployment by the JEMRMS.

Microbial Aerosol Tethering on Innovative Surfaces in the International Space Station (MATISS):  The crew removed the MATISS Sample Holder S/N5 and prepared it for return to the ground. The MATISS experiment investigates the antibacterial properties of materials in space for possible application in future spacecraft. MATISS is expected to provide additional insight into the mechanisms of attachment of biofilms in microgravity conditions.

Express Rack (ER)9B and 10B Umbilical Mate:  The crew mated the umbilical for ER9 at COL1F2 and installed an AC Inverter onto the rack.  The crew also mated the umbilical for the ER-10B at JPM1A5 and install an AC Inverter onto the rack.

Public Affairs Office (PAO) Event:  Expedition 56 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst participated in a live event with The International Astronautical Congress in Bremen, Germany.  An audience of about 5000 people participated in the event.  Topics discussed included space safety, daily life on the ISS and progress of the current mission.

Change of Command Ceremony:  The Change of Command Ceremony with Expedition 56 Commander Drew Feustel handing off station command to Expedition 57 Commander Alexander Gerst was held earlier today.  Gerst is the second European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut to serve as the ISS Commander (CDR).

HTV Cargo Operations: Today the crew continued with HTV7 Cargo Ops by completing loading the HTV Port 2 rack with trash and Starboard 2 rack unpack. The crew has been given flexibility on which JSBs can be loaded to increase efficiency. The crew has completed a total of 15 hours of HTV cargo transfer, ground specialist estimate the crew will require another 6 hours to complete HTV cargo transfer.

Offline Olaf

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Offline jacqmans

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #37 on: 10/10/2018 02:37 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/04/2018
 


54S Undock and Landing: The 54 Soyuz vehicle undocked successfully from the Mini Research Module (MRM)-2 Zenith Docking Port at 2:56 AM CT this morning. Following the completion of a fly-around maneuver, during which the crew took photos of ISS in celebration of its 20th Anniversary on-orbit, 54S completed a nominal de-orbit burn, separation of modules, and descent; the Soyuz vehicle landed in Dzhezkazgan, Kazakhstan at approximately 6:44 AM CT bringing Drew Feustel, Ricky Arnold, and Oleg Artemyev safely home to Earth.

Functional Immune: The crew completed the Functional Immune Health Assessment Questionnaire. Functional Immune analyzes blood and saliva samples to determine the changes taking place in crewmembers’ immune systems during flight. The changes in the immune system are also compared with crewmembers’ self-reported health information. Results are expected to provide new insight into the possible health risks of long-duration space travel, including future missions to Mars, asteroids, or other distant destinations.

Meteor:  Today the crew successfully recovered the Meteor laptop and checked the camera settings.  The next target of opportunity for the investigation is the Draconids meteor shower with a peak of 08-Oct-2018, but significant meteor flux occurring as early as 06-Oct.  The Draconids shower occurs when the Earth passes through the dust debris left by comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner.  The Meteor payload is a visible spectroscopy instrument used to observe meteors in Earth orbit. Meteor uses image analysis to provide information on the physical and chemical properties of the meteoroid dust, such as size, density, and chemical composition. The study of the meteoroid dust on orbit provides information about the parent comets and asteroids.

Pressure Management Device (PMD) Unpack and Deploy: PMD is a new device that allows for the depressurization and repressurization of vestibules without venting the air overboard. Scheduled for its first use this Friday, the crew unpacked PMD today and pre-deployed the unit in preparation for use during the upcoming Lab/Node 2 Fine Vestibule Leak Check; successful operation of PMD will help conserve ISS resources when both berthing visiting vehicles and conducting vestibules leak checks.

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #38 on: 10/10/2018 02:37 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/05/2018
 


Life Support Rack (LSR): The crew reviewed the LSR big picture words in preparation for the upcoming installation. Once the installation and checkout are complete, LSR will be capable of providing oxygen generation, carbon dioxide removal, and water generation. Life Support Rack (LSR) is a Technology Demonstrator for Closed Loop Air Revitalization. LSR captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR technologies were selected for integration into a single system, not requiring buffer tanks or compressors. It is intended to operate for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions and is sized to support a crew of three.

Lighting Effects:  The crew performed the Lighting Effects sleep logging activity. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Fine Leak Checks and Pressure Management Device (PMD):  Fine leak checks were successfully performed for the Node1/Lab and Node2/Lab vestibules today. The Crew was isolated aft of the Lab for approximately 6 hours while Lab hatches were closed. PMD was utilized successfully in support of the Node2/Lab portion of the leak checks. PMD helps conserve ISS resources and Crew time for depressurizing and pressurizing vestibule operations.

Treadmill (T2) Accelerometer R&R:  Today, the crew successfully replaced the Accelerometer within T2. In addition, they took advantage of the access and greased the forward right axle today. Once the replacement was complete, the crew and ground successfully performed a checkout of T2. The Accelerometer had been failed since April 12, 2018. Ground teams utilize accelerometer data to characterize the health of the T2 Vibration Isolation System (VIS).

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Re: Expedition 57 Thread
« Reply #39 on: 10/10/2018 02:38 pm »

ISS Daily Summary Report – 10/08/2018
 


Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Deployer 10 (J-SSOD#10):  On Saturday, Robotics Controllers in Tsukuba, Japan maneuvered the Japanese Experiment Module Remote Manipulator System (JEMRMS) to the small satellite deploy position and deployed the Japanese Small Satellite Orbital Demonstration (JSSOD)-10 satellites.  The crew supported the activity by taking photographs of the three small satellites as they were deployed.   

Lighting Effects: The crew conducted a Visual Performance Test for the Lighting Effects investigation today. They stowed the hardware in COL1F4, set the light to the correct mode, turned all other light sources in the Crew Quarters off, and performed a Numerical Verification Test, followed by a Color Discrimination Test. The Lighting Effects investigation studies the impact of the change from fluorescent light bulbs to solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) with adjustable intensity and color and aims to determine if the new lights can improve crew circadian rhythms, sleep, and cognitive performance.

Biochemical Profile: A crewmember collected Flight Day 120 blood and urine samples for the Biochemical Profile and Repository investigations today. The Biochemical Profile investigation tests blood and urine samples obtained from astronauts before, during, and after spaceflight. Specific proteins and chemicals in the samples are used as biomarkers, or indicators of health. Post-flight analysis yields a database of samples and test results, which scientists can use to study the effects of spaceflight on the body.

Radiation Dosimetry Inside ISS-Neutrons (RADI-N2): Today the eight detectors were retrieved from the Russian crew and deployed in the NOD3F3 Rack Front area. This Canadian Space Agency investigation measures neutron radiation levels in the ISS.  These bubble detectors are designed to only detect neutrons and ignore all other radiation.

Biomolecule Extraction and Sequencing Technology (BEST): Crew removed Flow Cell from the Biomolecule Sequencer and stowed the hardware. The BEST investigation studies the use of sequencing for identification of unknown microbial organisms living on the ISS, and how humans, plants and microbes adapt to living on the ISS.

Life Support Rack (LSR) Outfitting: The Crew removed the restraining launch locks from the LSR today. LSR is a Technology Demonstrator for Closed Loop Air Revitalization. It captures carbon dioxide from cabin air and recovers 50% of its oxygen for use by the astronauts. LSR will operate for a minimum of one year on the ISS to demonstrate the robustness of the technology for future Exploration Missions.

Basic Express Rack 9 (ER-9B) Outfitting and Activation:  The Crew manually adjusted the Moderate Temperature Loop (MTL) flow rate to the newly installed rack within the Columbus module.  In addition, they worked with the ground teams and successfully performed the initial activation and checkout of the rack.

IVA Procedure Review:  Serena reviewed an EVA System Briefing Package in support of the Battery EVAs planned for October 19 and 25.  The package contained reminders, emergency briefing, helpful tips, and procedures used by the IV Crewmember during EVAs.

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